Author Topic: Logan's Profiles - SdKfz 231 Halbkettenfahrzeug  (Read 198762 times)

Offline lauhof52

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Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
« Reply #420 on: September 27, 2013, 04:17:35 PM »
Great profile Logan! and top to read the Citation! Keeping up the good work. :)

regards
Lauhof

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
« Reply #421 on: September 28, 2013, 03:10:28 AM »
Thanks taiidan and apophenia!  I'm glad you liked the camo!  A lot of US equipment in WWII got a coat of OD and called it a day.  There are enough examples of exceptions, though, and they aren't generally well-known.  That's one of the reasons I do profiles.  I like to bring attention to those.

Thanks, lauhof!  Fair warning, I'm probably going to have to put a hold on the Navy Vikings because I need to do some research, complete some new ordnance, and take the weekend off.  So, you might get a new profile tomorrow, but I think sometime next week is more likely.

Cheers,

Logan

Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
« Reply #422 on: September 30, 2013, 08:49:48 PM »
Love the camo'd Vikings, especially the 2-tone on 1424!  :)

Offline Nexus1171

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Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
« Reply #423 on: October 09, 2013, 09:34:23 AM »
SB4U "Viking"

1.) I thought the 87's canopy was more curved like a fighter (slanted down in the back, and a turret sort of forming the aft glass section of the aircraft's canopy)?

2.) I'd think you'd want to use a different cowling (sometime more streamlined) or a bigger engine?

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
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Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
« Reply #424 on: October 09, 2013, 10:32:24 AM »
The canopy is totally new, but based somewhat on the SBD's.  The actual Stuka's canopy actual went through 3 major production variants.  I doubt any of them would have been considered acceptable by the US.  Since Vought would have been working with the Stuka prototype, they'd have had a canopy that nobody much cared for and I think it would have been one of the first things to change.  Furthermore, I needed something looked more generic and less readily identifiable as a Stuka's canopy.

Regarding the engine, it's an R-1830, which would have been perfect for the mid- to late-1930s competing against the R-1820-powered Northrop XBT-2.



The Stuka's fuselage is actually quite small and narrow.  That would make incorporating most radial engines difficult on the airframe, and that's the only type of engine the Navy used on carriers.  Despite that, I have been looking at my options for increasing power available on the aircraft.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Victory At Sea - Midway Is East
« Reply #425 on: November 07, 2013, 02:11:10 PM »
As per usual with the Vikings, note that this is reduced to 33%.  Click on the profile to see it on Photobucket where you can click again and see it at 100%.  I've also submitted this to the Clear Your Workbench GB and the Asiarama GB at the What If forums.



Finally, we're getting around to the USN Vikings at the Battle of Midway.  The first profile depicts an aircraft from the only dive-bomber squadron from the Yorktown or Enterprise to not participate in the sinking of any of the four Japanese carriers.  Not only this, but it was the only true Yorktown squadron on board the ship in what would be its most famous (and final) battle.  This was "Scouting" Five (V"S"-5).  Why the quotation marks?  Well, that wasn't even the squadron's actual designation.

To explain all this, we need to look at the squadrons that were typically found on US fleet carriers at the start of WWII.  You would have one squadron of fighters, two squadrons of dive bombers, and one squadron of torpedo bombers--four squadrons in total.  These squadrons all shared the same number, and this number corresponded to the carrier's hull number.  So, for instance, the USS Enterprise (CV-5) had four squadrons: Fighting Six (VF-6), Scouting Six (VS-6), Bombing Six (VB-6), and Torpedo Six (VT-6).  So, what's so unusual?  The Yorktown had VF-5, VS-5, VB-5, and VT-5, right?  Well, yes...and no.  At the Battle of Coral Sea, it had all four of these squadrons and they did very well, but the Yorktown was damaged in the battle and its squadrons likewise suffered serious losses.  As a result, when it returned to Pearl for repairs after the Battle of Coral Sea, only VB-5 remained on the carrier.  Well, now it was missing three squadrons.  Where was the US Navy going to find three trained, fully equipped carrier squadrons just lying around with nothing to do?  Well, right there at Pearl.



Sorry, more explanation is needed here.  When Pearl Harbor was attacked on December 7th, 1941, the United States had seven carriers: USS Lexington, Saratoga, Ranger, Yorktown, Enterprise, Wasp, and Hornet (CV-2 through -8, respectively).  Of these, the Ranger and the Wasp would spend the first few months of the war in the Atlantic and the newly commissioned Hornet was still training up and getting ready for the Doolittle Raid in April.  Its air group would see its first major action at Midway (and an inauspicious start it would be!).  That just left the Lexington, Saratoga, Yorktown, and Enterprise.  Well, as we well know, the Lexington and Yorktown would participate in the world's first major carrier vs. carrier action at Coral Sea where the Lexington was lost.  The Enterprise was raiding Japanese outposts throughout the Pacific and also escorted the Hornet during the Doolittle Raid.  Well, what about the Saratoga?  Unfortunately, the Saratoga was a bit of an unlucky ship.  Every time she got ready to take the battle to the Japanese, she would get torpedoed by a Japanese submarine (or otherwise damaged) and have to return to the US for repairs.  As a result, she didn't participate in many of the major US carrier battles of the early war.  Having been torpedoed by the I-6 on 11 January, 1942, she limped back to Pearl where she unloaded VF-3, VB-3, and VT-3.  She retained VS-3 as protection for the voyage back to the West Coast.  So, from January to May, these squadrons sat at Pearl waiting for something to do.  That "something" pulled into port on 27 May, 1942, when the Yorktown sailed into Pearl for repairs.



When the Yorktown set sail from Pearl on 30 May, she did so with VF-3, VB-3, and VT-3 from the Saratoga plus VB-5 from the Yorktown.  So, where did "VS-5" come from?  Well, as mentioned earlier US carriers were only used to have one squadron of each type on board a carrier at that point in the war--Fighting, Scouting, Bombing, and Torpedo.  To avoid confusion from having two "Bombing" squadrons, Yorktown's own VB-5 was temporarily redesignated "VS-5", or "Scouting Five".  Since the Scouting and Bombing squadrons used the same aircraft, had the same basic training, and could be used almost interchangeably as the situation required, a redesignation was all that was needed.



So, why didn't "Scouting" Five not participate in the attacks on the four Japanese carriers that so defined the Battle of Midway?  Fletcher decided to hold them in reserve during the strikes, much to the consternation of the aircrew of "Scouting" Five.  A number of VS-5's aircraft were lost when Yorktown was hit and sunk, but a number of them made it to the Enterprise to carry on the fight, along with aircraft from Yorktown's other squadrons (those "borrowed" from Saratoga).  In fact, due to fuel shortage, a number of aircraft from Hornet also landed on the Enterprise on the night of 5 June.  As a result, the Enterprise had a truly composite air wing on the morning of 6 June with aircraft from the Saratoga (CV-3), Yorktown (CV-5), Enterprise (CV-6), and Hornet (CV-8).  When the Japanese light cruisers Mikuma and Mogami were attacked on 6 June, "Scouting" Five finally got their chance to exact revenge for the loss of Yorktown, sinking Mikuma and heavily damaging Mogami.



All of Yorktown's squadrons would participate in the Battle of Midway and their combat actions along with the sinking of the Yorktown would account for the loss of many aircraft and aircrew, including those of the Saratoga squadrons.  The tragic irony in all of this, however, was that the recently repaired Saratoga would pull into Pearl Harbor on 6 June, 1942, only to find that only a week earlier its squadrons had left on the Yorktown for Midway and the Saratoga had arrived only days too late to participate in what was certainly one of the most important carrier battles in naval history.

Victory at Sea - Midway Is East


Cheers,

Logan
« Last Edit: November 08, 2013, 10:28:31 PM by Logan Hartke »

Offline lauhof52

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Victory At Sea - Midway Is East
« Reply #426 on: November 07, 2013, 03:50:31 PM »
Perfect! Logan. Nice to see Midway back on track again!  And thanks for the great story!  :)

regards
Lauhof

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Victory At Sea - Midway Is East
« Reply #427 on: November 07, 2013, 11:49:14 PM »
In case anyone was wondering why it's so beaten up, it's probably because the Yorktown had been involved in about 6 months of nearly continuous combat, including the Battle of Coral Sea.  The planes of VB-5 (renamed VS-5) were in the thick of it the whole time.  They didn't seem to have much time for repainting or touch ups.



Cheers,

Logan

Re: Logan's Profiles - Victory At Sea - Midway Is East
« Reply #428 on: November 08, 2013, 07:59:46 PM »
Well I for one think your VS-5 Viking's 'beaten up' look really works.  :)

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Victory At Sea - Midway Is East
« Reply #429 on: November 08, 2013, 10:29:45 PM »
Thanks, Empty Handed!

In all my shortcuts I use to post, I accidentally overwrote the earlier post.  I've fixed that, now I just need to post the new one!

Cheers,

Logan
« Last Edit: November 08, 2013, 10:32:29 PM by Logan Hartke »

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Victory At Sea - Midway Is East
« Reply #430 on: November 08, 2013, 10:30:23 PM »
As per usual with the Vikings, note that this is reduced to 33%.  Click on the profile to see it on Photobucket where you can click again and see it at 100%.  I've also submitted this to the Clear Your Workbench GB and the Asiarama GB at the What If Forums.



The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the NAVY CROSS to


LIEUTENANT COMMANDER RICHARD HALSEY BEST
UNITED STATES NAVY

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

Quote
    For extraordinary heroism in operations against the enemy while serving as Pilot of a carrier-based Navy Bomber and Squadron Commander in Bombing Squadron SIX (VB-6), attached to the U.S.S. ENTERPRISE (CV-6), during the "Air Battle of Midway," against enemy Japanese forces on 4 - 6 June 1942. Defying extreme danger from concentrated anti-aircraft barrage and powerful fighter opposition, Lieutenant Commander Best, with bold determination and courageous zeal, led his squadron in dive-bombing assaults against Japanese naval units. Flying at a distance from his own forces which rendered return unlikely because of probable fuel exhaustion, he pressed home his attacks with extreme disregard for his own personal safety. His gallant intrepidity and loyal devotion to duty contributed greatly to the success of our forces and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


This is going to be the final profile in the Midway series and, as you can see, I've saved the Best for last (pun absolutely intended).  Of the aviators that took direct part in the Battle of Midway, LCdr "Dick" Best was perhaps the most extraordinary.  He participated in both attacks on the Japanese carriers that took place on 4 June.  In fact, he was almost single-handedly responsible for the destruction of Akagi.

After contact reports of Midway-based PBY Catalina patrol aircraft on the morning of June 4, 1942, Enterprise started to launch her air group starting on 07:06h.  Under the overall command of the air group commander (CEAG) Lt.Cdr. Wade McClusky were 14 TBD-1 Devastator torpedo bombers of Torpedo Squadron 6 (VT-6), 34 SB4U-4 Vikings of VB-6, the CEAG section, and VS-6, and ten F4F-4 Wildcat fighters of Fighting Squadron 6 (VF-6).  However, the squadrons became separated and reached the Japanese independently. Only the dive bombers stayed together and reached the enemy by 09:55h.  At about 10:22h the Enterprise dive bombers started to attack two Japanese carriers, which proved to be the Kaga, and the Akagi.



At this point, the attack became confused, as all 34 Vikings started to attack Kaga, and none the Akagi.  Obviously, Best expected to attack according to the U.S. dive bomber doctrine.  This was that VB-6 would attack the nearer carrier (in that case Kaga) and VS-6 the one further away (here Akagi).  The three-plane CEAG section was expected to attack last, as their planes were equipped with cameras to assess the damage later.  However, evidently McClusky was not aware of this, having been a fighter pilot until becoming CEAG.  Therefore McClusky began his dive on Kaga, being followed by VS-6, and Best's VB-6 was also attacking Kaga according to doctrine. Lieutenant Best noticed the error and broke off with his two wingmen to attack the Akagi.



At 10:26h Best's three SB4Us attacked the Akagi.  The first bomb, dropped by Lt.(jg) Edwin John Kroeger, missed.  The second bomb, aimed by Ens. Frederick Thomas Weber, landed in the water, near the stern.  The force wave of that hit jammed the Akagi's rudder.  The last bomb, dropped by Best, punched though the flight deck and exploded in the upper hangar, in the middle of 18 Nakajima B5N2 planes, parked there.  That hit doomed the Akagi.  Later that day, Lieutenant Best participated in the attack on the last remaining Japanese carrier - the Hiryū, possibly scoring one of the four hits.  After the battle, Best was awarded the Navy Cross and the Distinguished Flying Cross.



However, on the morning flight Best had tested an oxygen bottle to be sure that it was not leaking caustic soda.  Best's first inhalation was then filled with gas fumes.  He snorted the gas fumes out, not thinking about it anymore.  The next day Best began to cough up blood repeatedly.  The flight surgeon found out that the gas fumes had activated latent tuberculosis.  He entered the hospital at Pearl Harbor on June 24, 1942.  After undergoing 32 months of treatment, Richard Best retired from the US Navy in 1944.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
  • Rivet-counting whiffer
Re: Logan's Profiles - Scottish Skorpions - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #431 on: November 09, 2013, 02:07:57 PM »
As per usual, click on the profile to see it at a larger size.  I've also submitted this to the Scottish Independence GB.



Wow, here's an aircraft type that I haven't touched in a long time!  And boy does it show...  So much I'd redo on this one if I had the time.  Anyway, no time for the backstory tonight, so you will all get the full write-up later, hopefully tomorrow night, may not be until next week.

Short version, the scheme is based on the Coastal Command aircraft flown by No. 612 Squadron in WWII.  The aircraft is being operated by a recently independent Royal Scottish Air Force in a not-too-distant hypothetical future.  I'll also post the versions of the roundel in a larger size when I do the full write-up.  I hope you all like it!

Cheers,

Logan

Offline lauhof52

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Scottish Skorpions - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #432 on: November 09, 2013, 03:44:50 PM »
WOW! 8)

Re: Logan's Profiles - Scottish Skorpions - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #433 on: November 10, 2013, 04:36:01 AM »
I'm a real fan of your Frogfeet/Scorpii in general and this one in particular!

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
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Re: Logan's Profiles - Scottish Skorpions - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #434 on: November 10, 2013, 11:38:25 AM »
Thanks, guys!  I'm glad you liked it!

So, I'm not too concerned about the details of the transition, but in this scenario, Scotland would end up as a constitutional monarchy, like Canada and Australia.  I did this mainly to keep the roundels and squadrons consistent.  So, as for the Skorpion, though, my idea was that a newly independent Scotland would have a need for an aircraft with a good maritime strike capability that could be used in the air policing role if necessary.  As such, this L-239 has wing tanks, a Litening III targeting pod, Paveway IIs, Mavericks, and AMRAAMs.  It could be fitted with more dedicated anti-ship missiles, if necessary.  I expected that Scotland would have the lineage of at least No. 602, 603, and 612 squadrons transferred with its independence.  In this scenario, Scotland gives 612 Sqn. an active military role again, equipping it with the L-239 in the anti-shipping/strike role.  Oh, by the way, can anyone that speaks Scots Gaelic tell me if I got the translation for Royal Scottish Air Force right?  I tried.

As for the roundel itself, it definitely pays homage to the RAF's roundel and is done in the style of Australia's and Canada's roundels, as well.  The lion is a major difference, however, and it's done in the style of the kangaroo in the RAAF roundel, kiwi in RNZAF roundel, and springbok in the old SAAF roundel.  I know the thistle may be the more appropriate national symbol, but it seemed less martial for a military insignia compared to the lion.  The standard Scottish lion is a bit...intricate for a roundel, so I took the somewhat simplified but still appropriate lion from British Caledonian's logo.  The other big difference is the color blue.  This lighter blue comes from Scottish Saltire instead of the darker blue on the Union Jack.



In the basic, full color variant above, it's seen with the full roundel and Scottish flag as the fin flash.



In this variant, the colors are retained, but with the omission of the fin flash, the same angled cross is overlaid on the roundel.  I really like the way this looked.



Finally, here's the low vis roundel.  It's a variant of the roundel with the cross.  You can see this on the upperside of the wings on the Skorpion profile, too.  When I design my own roundels, this is a pet peeve of mine.  I like a roundel that retains its unique look when all the color is removed and this does that very well, I think.

Hope you all like it!

Cheers,

Logan