Beyond The Sprues

Current and Finished Projects => Profiles and Pixels => Topic started by: Logan Hartke on December 23, 2011, 02:55:46 PM

Title: Logan's Profiles - SdKfz 231 Halbkettenfahrzeug
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 23, 2011, 02:55:46 PM
Since it's been so long since I posted, thought I would run through some of the differences and things to note on them.  I'm reposting both of them for comparison.  Note that these are reduced to 33%.  Click on the pictures to see them on Photobucket where you can click again and see them at 100% for much of the detail I will be discussing.

Old profile, where I left off (below):

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/USNViking8.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/?action=view&current=USNViking8.jpg)

Quote
Lt (jg) William E Hall was awarded the Medal of Honor for his 8th of May action in this aircraft while defending Lexington from Japanese carrier attack. Assigned to the low-level anti-torpedo aircraft patrol, Hall was seriously wounded in one foot but remained in the fight and shot down at least one Nakajima B5N attacking the ship. His Viking was so badly shot up that it was jettisoned overboard soon after landing back aboard the doomed Lexington.


Text slightly modified from the Osprey Combat Aircraft title.

New profile, first in a VERY long time (below):

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/USNViking9.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/?action=view&current=USNViking9.jpg)

Quote
Following the US task force's strike against Shokaku and Zuikaku on 8 May, Lexington and Yorktown were attacked by squadrons from both Japanese carriers. Among eight VS-5 crews assigned to a low-level anti-torpedo aircraft patrol was Lt(jg) 'Swede' Vejtasa and his gunner. Radioman Frank Wood. In the ensuing wavetop melee, A6M2 Zeros shot down four scouts with all crews lost. Vejtasa flew his SB4U aggressively, offering only deflection shots to the fighters, and was credited with three destroyed - only one A6M actually ditched with battle damage. Vejtasa was awarded the Navy Cross and soon joined VF-10, where he won a second award for his interception of Japanese torpedo bombers at Santa Cruz in October 1942.


Text slightly modified from the Osprey Combat Aircraft title.

I didn't want it to look like I just shifted some markings and called it "done", so I tweaked a number of things.  The second (most recent) aircraft represents an aircraft a little later on the production line.  As such, I gave it slightly brighter blue paint, slightly less weathering, a little different paint scheme (most noticeable around the horizontal stabilizer) that's more representative of the period scheme seen on Dauntlesses.  Likewise, I made the shine ever so slightly brighter, since it should be a newer aircraft.  The markings correspond to the profiles I've seen of Vejtasa's SBD from Coral Sea, but I've never seen an actual photo of the aircraft he flew in the battle, so I cannot verify any of them.  As a later aircraft than 4537, I have it using the later yellow-only tips starting to be seen on USN prop blades at about that time.  The paint chip pattern is different to keep things original, and Vejtasa's aircraft is depicted without LSO stripes but with the cowl number.  One of the other things that I spent a good deal of time on was getting that darned oversize star right.  I can't say that it's perfect, but I can sleep at night as it is now.  Many profiles don't show it properly, as the wrap around the curved portions of the fuselage do warp it quite a bit.

Finally, while also a Scout aircraft, Vejtasa's plane was one of the VS-5 pilots who attacked the IJN carrier Shōhō.  The profile actually depicts Vejtasa's aircraft on the way to the Shōhō, the day before his famous engagement with Zeros.  From what I've read, the scout planes were largely armed with 500lb bombs, which is what I depict his plane carrying.  Now, on MOST profiles, you'll see Dauntlesses carrying OD bombs.  I can't find pictures of USN dive bombers from the time of Coral Sea and Midway that support this.  The pictures that I see from that period generally show gray bombs.  Prewar and very early war photos show high explosive bombs in their regulation yellow paint.  I cannot take credit for this research, though I did try to independently verify it as well as I could.  Tommy Thomason's blog post on the matter was my main source. (http://tailspintopics.blogspot.com/2z010/01/us-navy-bombs-up-through-wwii.html)  Accordingly, I gave it a slightly rusty gray body with a pristine gray tail, roughly the same color as the aircraft underside.

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_wI-DdPSXymk/S0kRMCWEnwI/AAAAAAAAAoM/rTc3xHjSiy8/s640/PBY+Bomb+Jan+1943.jpg)

I hope you all enjoyed the comeback profile!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Bladerunner on December 23, 2011, 04:14:57 PM
Hey Logan,

Your work is as great as always.   :)

Cheers
John
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Empty Handed on December 23, 2011, 07:26:31 PM
Good to see you again. Your Viking is as stunning as ever.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: sotoolslinger on December 24, 2011, 12:22:41 AM
Beautiful work Logan. Welcome to the new place. I may have to build one of those one day.  :want:
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Brian da Basher on December 24, 2011, 12:31:10 AM
Nice one, Logan! Great to see you here!

Brian da Basher
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Gekko1 on December 24, 2011, 02:29:00 AM
 :in-love: Wow, awesome work Logan!

Cheers

Richard.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on December 24, 2011, 02:39:15 AM
Logan, great to have you aboard!

I still find it incredible to believe there is a Stuka in there somewhere.

Regards.

Greg
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Sentinel Chicken on December 24, 2011, 01:31:14 PM
Nicely done! The historical context is a nice complement to the illustrations.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Maverick on December 24, 2011, 01:59:06 PM
Nicely done Logan.

Regards,

John
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 24, 2011, 04:36:24 PM
I was finally able to finish the one I've been working on for a while.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/SovietViking1.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/?action=view&current=SovietViking1.jpg)

Quote
Another recipient of the RAF's unwanted Vikings was the Soviet Union, the first aircraft arriving in the winter of 1941-42.  The initial aircraft were Viking IIa variants.  While the Viking II was basically a British SB4U, complete with naval gear, the Viking IIa was a switch to a land-based variant, cooler heads having prevailed regarding the aircraft's utility.  It also didn't help that the FAA wasn't interested in any more of the RAF's aircraft, which meant there was little point in continuing the navalized aircraft charade.  The delivered aircraft were roughly analagous to the USAAC's A-19B variant, incorporating many of the same upgrades that benefitted the SB4U-4, such as self-sealing fuel tanks and armor plating, yet lacking the folding wings.

While not as heavily armored or as fast as the venerable Il-2 Sturmovik, it would really be unfair to make that comparison.  The Vought Viking was closer to the Petlyakov Pe-2, a dive-bomber.  Even then, however, the Pe-2 was a much larger and faster aircraft.  As a result, the Viking was assigned to units as a replacement to the generally unpopular Sukhoi Su-2.  The Viking ended up being a very popular aircraft in the right hands and quickly gained a reputation for being the most accurate bomber in the VVS inventory.  It was tough, maneuverable, and long-ranged, the main issue being its dire need for escorting aircraft over the front lines.  This aircraft is depicted in the colors of the 52nd BBAP (Blizhnebombardirovochniy Aviatsionniy Polk - Short-Range Bomber Air Regiment), the first unit to be fully equipped with the type and to take them into combat.  Its bomb racks were modified to take Soviet bombs (seen here with two 50 kg bombs and a single 250 kg bomb), but the standard gun armament remained unchanged.  Its original British markings have been crudely overpainted and replaced by the red stars and tactical number on the tail preferred at that time.


The unit was originally an Su-2 unit at that time, while the serial number comes from the series assigned to the Vultee Vengeance.  The paint scheme is just like the first P-400 Airacobras sent to the Soviet Union in the winter of 1941-42.  The most difficult things about this profile were the unique bombs and the unrewarding research on accurate Soviet VVS paint colors.

I hope you all enjoyed it!

Merry Christmas!

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Jeremak on December 24, 2011, 05:33:28 PM
For soviet WWII colours, I recomend, if you didn't found it already, this: http://www.simmerspaintshop.com/forums/f34-general-tutorials/basic-soviet-air-force-vvs-painting-colouration-markings-1940-45-a-545/ (http://www.simmerspaintshop.com/forums/f34-general-tutorials/basic-soviet-air-force-vvs-painting-colouration-markings-1940-45-a-545/) and colour swatches: http://www.simmerspaintshop.com/page-RGB-colors-Russia.html (http://www.simmerspaintshop.com/page-RGB-colors-Russia.html)
BTW: Viking look great.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 25, 2011, 01:18:13 AM
Thanks, Jeremak.  I have used Simmers site almost since I started, but the problem with the VVS is that I didn't trust the results of Simmers' advice, so I started looking elsewhere.  The problem wasn't that I didn't have enough sources.  It was that I had too many...and they all disagreed with each other!

http://www.simmerspaintshop.com/forums/f34-general-tutorials/basic-soviet-air-force-vvs-painting-colouration-markings-1940-45-a-545/ (http://www.simmerspaintshop.com/forums/f34-general-tutorials/basic-soviet-air-force-vvs-painting-colouration-markings-1940-45-a-545/)
http://www.simmerspaintshop.com/page-RGB-colors-Russia.html (http://www.simmerspaintshop.com/page-RGB-colors-Russia.html)
http://vvs.hobbyvista.com/Markings/P39/color_mark_1.php (http://vvs.hobbyvista.com/Markings/P39/color_mark_1.php)
http://vvs.hobbyvista.com/Research/1948/1948_Albom_Nakrasok.htm (http://vvs.hobbyvista.com/Research/1948/1948_Albom_Nakrasok.htm)
http://vvs.hobbyvista.com/Research/colour-samples.php (http://vvs.hobbyvista.com/Research/colour-samples.php)
http://mig3.sovietwarplanes.com/colors/colors.html (http://mig3.sovietwarplanes.com/colors/colors.html)
http://mig3.sovietwarplanes.com/colors/color-table.html (http://mig3.sovietwarplanes.com/colors/color-table.html)
http://www.cybermodeler.com/color/vvs_comp.shtml (http://www.cybermodeler.com/color/vvs_comp.shtml)
http://translate.google.fr/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.master194.com%2Fforum%2Fviewtopic.php%3Ff%3D3%26t%3D54267%26hilit%3D%2BVVS&sl=fr&tl=en&hl=&ie=UTF-8 (http://translate.google.fr/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.master194.com%2Fforum%2Fviewtopic.php%3Ff%3D3%26t%3D54267%26hilit%3D%2BVVS&sl=fr&tl=en&hl=&ie=UTF-8)

THIS was my problem.  Eventually, based on the advice of a number of sources, I just went with something based on one of the swatches and modified it slightly.  As a few sites said, there were probably a number of variations on them, different manufacturers interpreting AMT-4 different, for example.  Heck, they were painting some aircraft in "tractor green", so nobody was going to complain if the RGB values of your camouflage green was "a little off", so there was likely a lot of variation.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Jeffry Fontaine on December 25, 2011, 01:23:09 AM
That radial engined conversion is quite appealing, especially in the Navy color scheme. 
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Jeremak on December 25, 2011, 02:30:06 AM
Quote
The problem wasn't that I didn't have enough sources.  It was that I had too many...and they all disagreed with each other!
I know what you mean: I've touched this during making of WW I profiles: colours from this period is just madness. To say about only one: they can't really get what values give to PC-10!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 25, 2011, 08:18:00 AM
Thanks for all the compliments, everyone!  It's great to be back and doing profiles again!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 26, 2011, 11:48:12 AM
I was finally able to finish the one I've been working on for a while.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/FrenchViking5.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/?action=view&current=FrenchViking5.jpg)

Quote
The French use of the Vought Viking did not end in 1940.  A number of French pilots escaped to Britain after France's surrender, soon forming the core of the Free French Air Force.  The RAF equipped one squadron with the Vikings that were excess to its needs.  Having been operated by the French before the Armistice, the Viking was quite popular with the French pilots.  It wasn't long before they were assigned missions supporting Allied forces in North Africa.  The Free French Vikings gave accurate and effective close support throughout their time in the Middle East.  After suffering significant losses throughout 1941-42, GB Lorraine embarked for Britain to be re-equipped.

The main thing about this one was that I had to create the British 500 lb GP bomb for this profile, something that I intend to get more use out of later.  I also had to do most of the Lorraine Cross roundel myself to match the pictures I used as reference.  Finally, the research for the FAFL wasn't easy and I ended up not using a lot of what I intended because I found contradictory sources and there's not much else that bothers me more when doing research for these profiles.

Merry Christmas!

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on December 27, 2011, 01:38:21 AM
Logan, these are great! Glad to see you back in action.  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on December 27, 2011, 03:55:52 PM
Just TOP! Logan. :-*  Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 28, 2011, 03:52:06 PM
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/FrenchViking6.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/?action=view&current=FrenchViking6.jpg)

Quote
After the 1940 Armistice, most of the surviving French aircraft were incorporated into the Vichy French Air Force.  The Vikings of GB I/19 and GB II/19 were transferred to Algeria, where--due to attrition and a lack of spares--GB I/19 was disbanded.  Its remaining equipment and personnel were incorporated into GB II/19 which was then renamed...GB I/19 the next year, maintaining its original traditions.  It would remain in Algeria throughout 1941 and 1942, finally standing down on 10 November when Admiral Darlan signed a ceasefire with the Allies following Operation Torch.  This would not be the end of GB I/19 or its Vikings, both continuing to serve in the training role as the French prepared to liberate their homeland from Nazi occupation.

The profile depicts one of GB I/19's aircraft in mid-1942 in Algeria, before the Allied invasion of North Africa.  It shows an aircraft with the full extent of Vichy markings and before the French roundel was deleted from aircraft sides later in 1942.

Things to note about this profile:

This is the first profile I've had to do that is essentially 2 different aircraft.  The first was mostly done already, having been the 1940 French Viking I did two years ago.  It would just be a more heavily worn version of that same aircraft, being 2 years later.  The other aircraft was that Vichy one, covered in red and yellow stripes just a few weeks earlier.  Unfortunately...that concept does play well with paint chipping, wear, etc.  In short, it made my life pretty difficult and put layers way out of order.  I don't know if I'll ever use this Viking as a template for any others my layers are so out of whack.

The other things that sucked were the stripes on curved surfaces.  Those on the wing and ESPECIALLY those on the engine cowling.  I like the way they turned out, but those were a big pain.  They took forever and were the hardest thing about the whole profile.  Anyway, I do love how this one turned out and I hope all of you do, too!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on December 28, 2011, 05:13:50 PM
Excelent work! Logan.  :want:  Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on December 28, 2011, 11:57:11 PM
Logan, I know how you feel about layers getting out of whack...can get pretty confusing to get the look your after.  :dizzy:  On the other hand it appears to have been worth it!  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: BadersBusCompany on December 29, 2011, 01:13:44 AM
Hi Logan, excellent profiles as ever and its great to see you on here  :D

regards

Mark
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on December 29, 2011, 03:17:51 AM
Colourful!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 29, 2011, 05:49:22 AM
Thanks, guys!  I'm glad you all liked it.  I'm really happy about how the Vichy Viking turned out.

I got a question on the What-If forum and I thought some of you might be interested in my response to it, so I'll repost it below:

Each of my profiles probably takes an average of about 6+ hours, with about half of that time being research.  I'll check serial numbers, unit movement dates, unit strengths, construction numbers, etc.  It's not just important for me to get the markings right, but to know WHY the markings are a certain way, then try to verify them with actual photos.  That's why my somewhat mocking title on the forum is "rivet-counting whiffer".  I'm the closest thing the Whiffing world has to a JMN.  I'm not that critical of other people's work, but I want mine to be right.

In fact, I think that making a historically accurate Whif profile is actually HARDER than making a 100% historically accurate profile.  Given good enough photographs of the subject, all you have to do is copy what you see in the picture.  You don't have to know what any of the markings mean, heck, you don't need to even know what kind of plane it is!

When you're Whifing a profile, you have to know WHY every marking existed on the plane.  You need to put the red prop stripe in the right place.  You need to know that the white line on the tail is an LSO stripe and you need to change the angle for your plane compared to the real-world example you got it from.  You need to make up an aircraft type code if it's Finnish, make up a manufacturer code if it's Dutch, find an unused serial number series if it's British, etc.  These are all things that people figured out and did for you 70+ years ago if you're doing a REAL profile.  If you're doing a Whif, you need to step into the shoes of some underpaid clerk in a cold Finnish Ministry of Defence basement office and figure out what unused two-letter code is most logical for the aircraft in question.  This is both the fun and frustrating part of these profiles.  It takes sometimes hours of research.  For example, I bought about 2 books and joined a Yahoo group on NEI Aviation just so I could make an educated guess as to what codes the ML-KNIL and MLD would use on Vikings.  This isn't a problem for real-world profilers!

(http://www.asisbiz.com/il2/F2A-2/MkI-FAF-LeLv24.2-BW352/images/1-FAF-Brewster-Buffalo-LeLv24.2-BW352-Finland-02.jpg)

From a technical standpoint, I use Adobe Photoshop, currently CS5.  Most of my profiles are hundreds of layers (553 with the Vichy Viking), but only about a third of them (190 on the Vichy Viking) are actually visible in the profile, many of them being unused "options" (different kinds of bombs/spinners/etc) or merely stepping stones to get to the final result.

Another thing that's different about the way I do profiles is that almost nothing has multiple colors on the same layer.  With the exception of unit markings, I basically make every layer a single color.  Also, almost every layer is straight up ff0000 RED.  What I then do is apply a color overlay layer to change the color of that layer to what I want.  In my experience, it's a bit more seamless to quickly change colors that way.  Also, if I want to see the exact boundaries of any particular layer, all I have to do is take off the overlay and it pops right out.  The other thing that I like about this method is that it allows me to quickly add things like patterns, strokes, gradients, etc. with very little trouble.  If you really want to make it its own layer with the right color (sometime very helpful), just throw in another blank layer and merge them.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Sentinel Chicken on December 29, 2011, 09:49:45 AM
I'm impressed with how you've used Photoshop for these profiles, Logan. I had started out that way but very early on vector-based software was more suited to how I work (currently using Illustrator CS2). One of the things that a lot of folks don't realize is that there are a lot of similarities to kit building in "assembling" these profiles as I have my layers based upon sections and sub-assemblies not unlike a model kit. We also have to take into consideration weathering and paint schemes and even the scale effect at times.

Thanks for the detailed explanation of your approach!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 29, 2011, 02:13:59 PM
I'm impressed with how you've used Photoshop for these profiles, Logan. I had started out that way but very early on vector-based software was more suited to how I work (currently using Illustrator CS2). One of the things that a lot of folks don't realize is that there are a lot of similarities to kit building in "assembling" these profiles as I have my layers based upon sections and sub-assemblies not unlike a model kit. We also have to take into consideration weathering and paint schemes and even the scale effect at times.

Thanks for the detailed explanation of your approach!

Thanks, Sentinel Chicken!  Your profiles always have great lines, colors, and details.  They always look so crisp and clean.

One of the advantages to me doing the profiles in Photoshop, however, is that there is a finite limit to what you can do.  This is only an advantage because of the human element making the profile.  If I used vector art, I'd be tempted to include way more detail in the profile than could ever be made out by anyone.  I'm the sort of person that would only realize this after I'd finished typing up the ingredients on the pack of Beemans gum in the pocket of the leather jacket on the pilot.  Fortunately, once I hit pixels, I can call it well and truly done in Photoshop.  That can be a real advantage when you get to the obsession stage of a profile.

Even with the limitations of Photoshop vs Illustrator, I still have a 3 foot wide giant graphic of the XB-51 profile that a professional printer friend of mine was kind enough to do for me with no loss in quality at all.  You can read the small print on the side of the plane.  Not bad for non-vector art!  I've always hated the monkeys that designed Illustrator, too.  In my use of the Adobe Creative Suite at work, Illustrator has always crashed on me far more often than Photoshop.  Illustrator's just less intuitive when I use it, too, even after about 5 years.  I've considered switching a few times, but I don't see it happening.  I'd rather just increase the resolution of the Photoshop images I do, something I've always done, anyway.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Jeremak on December 29, 2011, 07:02:12 PM
I also use a non-vector software, but it's Gimp, not Photoshop. In my PZL P.11 I had layers for (from the top): wires, white background (on top to mask some things), shadow, glass, tires, 8 laiers of lighting effect on different parts of plane, weathering layer (made of about 3-4 merged), 2 layers for rivetes, one for effect of corrugated sheet on tail, one for colour difference between fuselage panels, machine guns, leather in cockpit, two for texture, unseen lines, which on profile was based, and 11 layers for three different colour schemes. It's good that I keep all that files on my computer. Also: I know what you mean Logan, when you sey, that "layers goes wrong": I've had one that incicdent, with one of my WW1 profiles.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: RussC on January 01, 2012, 05:15:11 AM
Hello, Logan. Just met you over on WI and now over here as well.

 :D

Russ
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 01, 2012, 07:27:20 AM
Thanks everyone!  Anyone want another profile?

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/GermanViking3.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/?action=view&current=GermanViking3.jpg)

Quote
In 1941, Germany turned its ire towards the Balkans, quickly rolling through Yugoslavia and Greece.  With them the whole time were the Stukas, hitting enemy bridges, tanks, strongpoints, and ships.  Nowhere would the Stuka become more feared than in the skies over the island of Crete.  The Royal Navy operated unchallenged in the Mediterranean at that time, establishing a protective steel ring around the island, thwarting Axis plans to control the Aegean Sea...or so they thought.  Junkers Ju 52s appeared in large numbers overhead on the 20th of May, dropping thousands of paratroopers on the Greek island.

While also supporting the Fallschirmjäger on the ground, the Stukas also sought out targets at sea, striking at the Royal Navy with near impunity, the Royal Air Force unable to contest the skies over Crete.  As the hard-fought battle for Crete shifted in favor of the Germans, the Royal Navy soon began a desperate rescue mission, evacuating the surviving Allied troops from the island.  The Stukas would once again make themselves known, striking at the British cruisers and destroyers fleeing the island.  Some ships were heavily damaged, limping into Alexandria many hours after the ordeal, but others were not so lucky taking their crews and soldiers to the bottom of the Mediterranean.

The profile above depicts a Ju 187 Wiking (former French V-187-F2 Viking) of Sturzkampfgeschwader 3 as it appeared during the devastating attacks on HMS Dido and HMS Orion on May 29th, 1941.

Things to note about this profile:

Nothing technically too hard about this one.  I used my previous German profile but gave it a good deal of weathering and a lot more detail.  Overall, I think it's a lot more polished than the previous German profile I did some time ago.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Maverick on January 01, 2012, 07:40:30 AM
Nice ships Logan.  My favourite has to be the Vichy one.

Regards,

John
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: AXOR on January 01, 2012, 07:44:27 AM
We want,of course...looks fantastic in luftwaffe markings ! :want:

Alex
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: ChernayaAkula on January 01, 2012, 08:25:03 AM
Jolly good stuff, Logan! Good to have you back in the profile business!  :)

([url]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/GermanViking3.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/?action=view&current=GermanViking3.jpg[/url])


This.......................... on floats! (http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m309/ChernayaAkula/Emoticons/w00t.gif)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Sentinel Chicken on January 01, 2012, 01:31:20 PM
One of the advantages to me doing the profiles in Photoshop, however, is that there is a finite limit to what you can do.  This is only an advantage because of the human element making the profile.  If I used vector art, I'd be tempted to include way more detail in the profile than could ever be made out by anyone.  I'm the sort of person that would only realize this after I'd finished typing up the ingredients on the pack of Beemans gum in the pocket of the leather jacket on the pilot.  Fortunately, once I hit pixels, I can call it well and truly done in Photoshop.  That can be a real advantage when you get to the obsession stage of a profile.
I've had this happen to me before. I call it "Mission Creep" in Illustrator. I once had a profile that I worked on for quite literally several months going insane on details before burning out. That taught me a lesson, now what I do depending upon what the illustration is going to be used for is to set hard limits on how closely I'll zoom in to work on a detail. The BAe-146 and A-7 Corsair profiles started out as experiments with these hard limits where I'd zoom no closer than 200%. I also had to keep myself from creating an object within the 100-200% range and then scaling it down, that's just cheating any sort of hard limits I'd set for myself. Over time it's forced me to be more efficient at Illustrator and to think of the gestalt of the whole illustration rather than going apeshit over something that in the finished product would be near invisible.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 01, 2012, 03:21:21 PM
Thanks, guys, I'm glad you enjoyed it.  I always loved the German aircraft with yellow campaign markings.  Alright, next up, my first profile of the year (by my clock)!

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/GermanViking4.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/?action=view&current=GermanViking4.jpg)

Quote
As early as 1935, Germany began seriously investigating the construction of aircraft carriers for the Kriegsmarine.  At the same time Germany also set about developing an air wing for these carriers.  This would require aircraft suitable for shipboard use.  The design of a modern naval dive bomber met with some difficulty, the initial aircraft being an outdated biplane type.  When the construction of the Graf Zeppelin was placed on hold in 1939, efforts to create an air wing for it were also placed on hold.  After the fall of France, Germany again took a hard look at making the Graf Zeppelin operational.  By this time, a large number of Vought Vikings had been captured, some of the most recent in France having originally been built for the US Navy.  Because of its clear suitability for the role, it was quickly decided to make the “Ju 187 Wiking” the standard shipboard dive bomber of the Graf Zeppelin.

The first aircraft to be reassembled were transferred to Travemünde on the Baltic in Germany for testing using the catapults and arresting wires being tested for use with Germany’s carrier.  Many of these were incomplete, having been stripped of some US Navy-specific equipment, but it did not take long for those components to be fabricated and replaced.  Besides the obvious landing and takeoff trials were tests of naval camouflage, this early scheme being used on an ex-USN SB4U-2.  Inspired by German fighter units, it was also found to be reasonably suitable for the Ju 187 in its intended dive bombing role over water.  This aircraft was later lost during an Allied attack on Travemünde, being damaged beyond economical repair.

Things to note about this profile:

Much cleaner than most previous aircraft, as it's intended for use in Germany in a testing and training environment.  The research for this one was about the hardest thing, the serials of trial units not being well-documented in the least bit.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Damian on January 01, 2012, 04:29:56 PM
([url]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/GermanViking4.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/?action=view&current=GermanViking4.jpg[/url])


Geez Logan your profiles have come so far and are STUNNING! Can't wait to see what comes next.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Maverick on January 01, 2012, 06:23:29 PM
Very nice indeed.  You'll have to throw a hook on it and give it different camo for an operational KM unit.

Regards,

John
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on January 01, 2012, 06:36:25 PM
Very very nice german vikings! Top! :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Empty Handed on January 01, 2012, 07:19:25 PM
Love the camo scheme on the See Wiking!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Robert on January 01, 2012, 09:27:04 PM
Lookin' good!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: jorel62 on January 02, 2012, 04:39:48 AM
AWESOME MAN!!!!!!!!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on January 02, 2012, 07:06:59 AM
Very Nice!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 02, 2012, 11:20:45 AM
Thanks for the compliments, everyone!  Mav, it already has a tailhook, it's just fully retractable.  You want more schemes, though...

How about 3 more from Travemünde?  I'll post my previous write-up directly below this sentence and another new one underneath the 3 profiles.

Quote
As early as 1935, Germany began seriously investigating the construction of aircraft carriers for the Kriegsmarine.  At the same time Germany also set about developing an air wing for these carriers.  This would require aircraft suitable for shipboard use.  The design of a modern naval dive bomber met with some difficulty, the initial aircraft being an outdated biplane type.  When the construction of the Graf Zeppelin was placed on hold in 1939, efforts to create an air wing for it were also placed on hold.  After the fall of France, Germany again took a hard look at making the Graf Zeppelin operational.  By this time, a large number of Vought Vikings had been captured, some of the most recent in France having originally been built for the US Navy.  Because of its clear suitability for the role, it was quickly decided to make the “Ju 187 Wiking” the standard shipboard dive bomber of the Graf Zeppelin.

The first aircraft to be reassembled were transferred to Travemünde on the Baltic in Germany for testing using the catapults and arresting wires being tested for use with Germany’s carrier.  Many of these were incomplete, having been stripped of some US Navy-specific equipment, but it did not take long for those components to be fabricated and replaced.  Besides the obvious landing and takeoff trials were tests of naval camouflage, this early scheme being used on an ex-USN SB4U-2.  Inspired by German fighter units, it was also found to be reasonably suitable for the Ju 187 in its intended dive bombing role over water.  This aircraft was later lost during an Allied attack on Travemünde, being damaged beyond economical repair.


(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/GermanViking5.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/?action=view&current=GermanViking5.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/GermanViking6.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/?action=view&current=GermanViking6.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/GermanViking7.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/?action=view&current=GermanViking7.jpg)

Quote
The overwhelming majority of Vikings used by the Luftwaffe at Travemünde were originally US Navy Vikings sent to France in the days shortly before France's surrender.  This included a pair of aircraft that had come directly from the factory to enter US Navy service possessing sequential construction numbers and Bureau Numbers.  Fittingly, they entered German military service and received sequential Stammkennzeichen.  While this is normal in units throughout the various armed forces of the world, it is less usual when the aircraft have already served in the colors of three different air arms in their lifetime.  This was not lost on the pilots and ground crew of Travemünde, so the aircraft were named Freya and Freyr after the twin gods of Norse mythology, worshipped by the Vikings a millennia earlier.  Ironically, the "Wikinger-Zwillinge" both came from Naval Reserve Air Base Anacostia, Washington, D.C.

These aircraft are picture in various schemes designed to test visibility over water, the dark grays and greens being most effective over the Baltic and North Atlantic.  They were also tested in various all-up weight configurations on the catapults, proving to be almost too heavy for the catapults at their highest take-off weight.  In contrast, the German arresting gear was shown to be excellent, reliably stopping the rechristened Ju 187s in any configuration.  The one feature of the SB4U Viking that the Luftwaffe considered totally unacceptable was its total lack of folding wings.  Not realizing that the Vought had already solved the very same issue by that time, Junkers set about developing a wing folding mechanism for the Ju 187.  Unsurprisingly, the Junkers wing-fold devised for the navalized Ju 187 was fundamentally the same the one developed by Vought for the SB4U-4, folding back along the fuselage, leading edge pointing downwards.

The unit was jokingly called "The Flying Circus" because of the variety of schemes used on their aircraft, markings and camouflage changing with some regularity.  After yet another series of delays with the carrier Graf Zeppelin, much of the unit's aircraft and personnel were transferred to the Netherlands and operated alongside Erprobungsgruppe 167 (the trials unit for the Fi 167 carrier-based torpedo bomber).  Unfortunately, this change in fortunes and geography earned the unit another name, "the crew of the Flying Dutchman" after the mythical phantom ship.

Things to note about these profiles:

I sort of screwed up on the last profile, since I didn't include the Stammkennzeichen on the bottom of the wing, my previous German profiles having only had Verbandskennzeichen.  I can excuse this as the underside of the aircraft was recently repainted.  Since I had the opportunity to get it right on these three, I did.  The BuNos I used were originally SBC Helldivers that were transferred to France and halfway there when France surrendered, ending their lives on a hillside on Martinique.  The BuNos 1840 & 1841 did in fact come from NRAB Anacostia, while the other came from NRAB St. Louis, close to where I grew up.

I tried to vary the markings and schemes enough to give a variety, including the names Freya and Freyr on the "twins".  Different spinners can also give each aircraft its own character, so I used this to my advantage.

I hope you guys like the story and the profiles!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Maverick on January 02, 2012, 03:42:07 PM
Thanks for the explanation Logan.  My fave would be the 3rd of the bunch.

Regards,

John
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on January 02, 2012, 06:47:36 PM
Very realistic story and nice to read!  :) Top german vikings - as always.  8) But Logan...uh, just for my sake, is there any chance you finally get to midway...?

 :want:

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: jorel62 on January 03, 2012, 01:49:53 AM
WOW!!!!!!! :in-love:
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 03, 2012, 03:09:42 AM
Very realistic story and nice to read!  :) Top german vikings - as always.  8) But Logan...uh, just for my sake, is there any chance you finally get to midway...?

 :want:

Thanks, lauhof!  I'll definitely get there, sooner than later as long as I don't take another 18 month sabbatical!  I have at least 3 different Midway schemes planned, though I may do more than that.  Right now, though, I'm trying to clear out a backlog of profiles from the pre-1942 period that I was planning on doing.  I'm heading south of the border for my next couple of profiles I think, though.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on January 07, 2012, 02:43:43 AM
Thanks Logan. Very nice to read this info!  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 07, 2012, 03:27:22 AM
Yeah, work's in the way at the moment.  I haven't cracked open Photoshop all week, yet.

Thanks,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: BadersBusCompany on January 08, 2012, 10:28:30 AM
Awsome Wikings Logan...............superb!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 17, 2012, 05:54:02 AM
So, what have I been working on?  Work, unfortunately.  I work for a tax software company and now that the year is over, everyone is using our software at the same time, so I don't have a lot of free time.  I WAS able to get some work done this weekend, however.

I have still been researching some Viking schemes, but I also found some great P-61 sources, so I'll likely try to finish that up sometime, but I've also started a brand new project.  The line art has been provided by my father.  He does line art of What If aircraft and variants on paper, so I scanned his last one in and will be taking some time to do the lighting and shading of it.  It will take some time because it has struts and wires and spats (a first for me), but I think it will look pretty good in the end.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on January 17, 2012, 06:02:30 AM
Did he say 'spats'?  Go for it Logan!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Brian da Basher on January 19, 2012, 08:47:32 AM
Did someone say spats?

I am eagerly anticipating this and would like to subscribe to your newsletter...

Brian da Basher
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on January 19, 2012, 05:23:59 PM
Did someone say spats?

I am eagerly anticipating this and would like to subscribe to your newsletter...

Brian da Basher


Down boy!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 20, 2012, 07:27:25 AM
Brian's like the Crazy Harry of spats.  "Did someone say spats?!  Ahaha!"

(http://images3.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20060209170131/muppet/images/1/1b/Crazy_Harry.JPG)

On the matter of the aircraft... it's coming along, actually.  I am done dissecting it, breaking the aircraft up into all of its little bits and pieces.  I just did a lot of the fabric-covered structures, also basically a new thing for me.  Right now, I'm working on the last of the unpainted detail.  This is things like exhausts, weapons, tires, etc.--things that don't change profile to profile.  It's the profile equivalent of polishing brightwork.

After that I have the lighting and shading, which I imagine will take a few more days, then it will be ready from primetime.

It's a decently rare aircraft, so when I get most of the shading done, I'll have a brief "name that plane" contest before I post the first profile.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Flitzer on January 20, 2012, 11:32:09 PM
Love your work Logan :).

Really looking forward to the Spat-work.

P
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 24, 2012, 05:55:17 AM
All the detail work is basically done.  I'm about half done with the fuselage lighting and shading.  After that I'll be doing the lighting and shading on the wings, struts, etc.  I'm really trying to convey as much of the aircraft's 3D presence as I can in 2D.  That's making it a lot harder, but it's looking pretty good.  My father was pleased with the progress that I've made with his line art when he saw it this weekend.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Brian da Basher on January 24, 2012, 05:59:08 AM
Tease!

Brian da Basher
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 28, 2012, 08:30:56 AM
I told you I was working on it!

Alright, she's not done, but she's done enough for a round of "Name! That! Plane!!!"

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Scrapbook/MysteryPlane1.jpg)

It's got a new engine and a new pair of shoes, but, other than that, she's pretty much original.  So what is it?

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on January 28, 2012, 09:07:38 AM
Has a French pre-WWII look to it.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on January 28, 2012, 09:24:58 AM
Scratch that last one - Heinkel He 46 per chance?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Brian da Basher on January 28, 2012, 09:26:33 AM
Wow that's hot! Most excellent work, Logan and my what lovely spats it has!
 :-*
Mr GTX my original thought was a Morane-Saulnier too but something about the rear 'pit and the tail kept making me think Spanish Civil War so now my best guess is it's an He-46.

Brian da Basher

P.S. Beaten to the punch by the alway prompt Mr GTX!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on January 28, 2012, 09:31:41 AM
my original thought was a Morane-Saulnier too but something about the rear 'pit and the tail

My thoughts exactly.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 28, 2012, 09:58:22 AM
Well done you two!  It is indeed an He 46 variant.  This is the original line art as drawn by my dad.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Scrapbook/He46G-1-Shrunk.jpg)

I removed the MG 15 in my image so that it wasn't a dead giveaway.  My first profile should be following soon.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on January 28, 2012, 10:46:12 AM
Nice Logan! And the spats have an He-51 look about to keep it all in the family  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Cliffy B on January 28, 2012, 11:41:47 AM
Mmmmmm...a string bag!  *gets the popcorn*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on January 28, 2012, 11:45:11 AM
Is it sad that we were able to so quickly identify what is a rather obscure aircraft?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on January 28, 2012, 12:53:09 PM
Logan, very nice! And tell your Dad he did a great job!  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 28, 2012, 02:11:01 PM
Thanks everybody!  The spats do make it seem more like a sibling of the He 51 than the original, apophenia.  That cowling, spinner, and spats really make it look 10 years newer than the standard He 46, doesn't it?  That may not be saying much, but I think it is a big improvement aesthetically.

The ID skills were more impressive than anything, Greg, though I do agree with you and Brian that it has a bit of a Morane-Saulnier look to it.

Thanks, Doom!  I'll make sure to pass that along.

Full profile coming soon...

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 28, 2012, 04:44:18 PM
As promised:

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/GermanHe46G1.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/?action=view&current=GermanHe46G1.jpg)

Quote
From the outset, the Heinkel He 46 was considered to be underpowered--too slow to operate over the modern battlefield.  The early He 46C was accepted in small numbers by the nascent Luftwaffe, but Heinkel had already undertaken a program to re-engine the He 46 at least as a stopgap until a more advanced design could be produced.  The BMW 132 was selected for its reliability and fuel efficiency.  This was the same engine that powered the Junkers Ju 52 at that time.  Initially, the increased power resulted in significant vibration throughout the airframe, but a redesign of the engine mount alleviated much of this.  The improved aircraft was designated the He 46G and rewarded with a production contract almost immediately to help rearm Germany's Luftwaffe.

While never a fantastic aircraft in any aspect of flight, the He 46 was sturdy and reliable, making it popular in forward operations.  Its handling was sedate but very forgiving, and it wasn't necessarily easy prey in the hands of a skilled pilot.  The aircraft would quickly come to equip nearly all Luftwaffe short-range reconnaissance squadrons from 1936-37.  To meet such a demand in such a short time span, the aircraft would be produced by Heinkel, Siebel, MIAG, Fieseler, and Gotha.  It formed the backbone of Luftwaffe Aufklärungsstaffeln in the pre-war period.


Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: JP Vieira on January 28, 2012, 07:30:12 PM
Excellent! :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Empty Handed on January 28, 2012, 08:26:43 PM
Very nice work!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on January 29, 2012, 02:42:40 AM
Very nice work!

What he said.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on January 29, 2012, 05:16:09 AM
Very nice  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on January 29, 2012, 07:24:14 AM
Very nice Logan. The He-46 always seemed business-like but I'd never have described it as 'handsome' until now!

... That cowling, spinner, and spats really make it look 10 years newer than the standard He 46, doesn't it?  That may not be saying much, but I think it is a big improvement aesthetically...

Indeed. Some of (all?) the He46Fs had cowlings but those were less shapely than yours. I don't think any had spinners and they certainly lacked spats! Your 'G-1 is a vast improvement  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on January 29, 2012, 07:27:29 AM
I can see some South American operators of this...
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on January 29, 2012, 07:32:43 AM
I can see some South American operators of this...

And maybe the Greeks (instead of the Hs-126)?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Talos on January 29, 2012, 07:51:24 AM
Looks good, Logan. Great job!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 29, 2012, 03:16:33 PM
Very nice Logan. The He-46 always seemed business-like but I'd never have described it as 'handsome' until now!

...Some of (all?) the He46Fs had cowlings but those were less shapely than yours. I don't think any had spinners and they certainly lacked spats! Your 'G-1 is a vast improvement  :)


Thanks!  The Hungarian He 46Es had a cowled engine and spinner, but it was a lower-mounted engine that I don't think looked quite as good, and the spats do something nice for the hypothetical -G.  The Spanish fabricated some spats for at least one of their -Cs, but the uncowled engine always has a distinctly 1920s feel to my eyes.

(http://home.mit.bme.hu/~tade/ac-pict/Hung-AF/pre-1945/He46/H46p8.jpg)

I can see some South American operators of this...


Hmm, I'll see what I can do later.

And maybe the Greeks (instead of the Hs-126)?


That's one I was already planning on.  I have about 1/2 dozen countries lined up in my head to receive some.

By the way, I showed the finished profile off to my dad when I saw him today and he really liked what I'd done with his original drawing.  He's also appreciative of all the nice comments from the forum members here, so thanks for all the kind words.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on January 30, 2012, 07:02:17 AM
Logan: Thanks, didn't know that the Hungarian 'Es had those features. I found a drawing -- that 'E-2 has a really long-chord cowling. Did they have the same SAM 322 engine or something new, I wonder?

Looking forward to the Greek AF version!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 30, 2012, 07:33:01 AM
It was a Manfred Weiss engine, a license-built variant of the Gnome-Rhône 14K, if memory serves.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 30, 2012, 09:19:11 AM
"Shiny.  Let's be bad guys."

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/GermanHe46G2.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/?action=view&current=GermanHe46G2.jpg)

Quote
The development and testing of the BMW 132-powered He 46G took some time due to the trial and error required in resolving the severe vibration encountered at high RPMs.  Eventually, however, Heinkel began construction of a pre-production batch of He 46G-0s.  This profile depicts one such aircraft, still bearing its civilian Luftfahrzeugkennzeichen during factory trials prior to its delivery to the Luftwaffe for acceptance testing.  It has its full suite of equipment fitted, the greater power of the He 46G allowing for a higher gross weight compared to previous variants.  It is painted in overall RLM 01 silver, the standard for prototypes at that time.


Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Talos on January 30, 2012, 09:49:31 AM
Looks like the one that the Doctors Jones stole from the Zeppelin in '38.

Nice work.  ;)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on January 30, 2012, 10:39:23 AM
It was a Manfred Weiss engine, a license-built variant of the Gnome-Rhône 14K, if memory serves.

Thanks Logan. That was my memory too but a quick search brought no confirmation.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 30, 2012, 01:21:21 PM
How about another, but this time with camouflage?

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/GermanHe46G3.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/?action=view&current=GermanHe46G3.jpg)

Well, that's it for the night.  I hope you guys enjoy it!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Flitzer on January 30, 2012, 03:48:58 PM
Lovely delicate shading and tones.

Love it.

P
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: JP Vieira on January 30, 2012, 06:09:49 PM
Very good looking
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on January 30, 2012, 06:40:31 PM
Nice.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on January 31, 2012, 02:04:31 AM
Now your just showin' off! Very, very nice.  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 31, 2012, 02:57:45 AM
Looks like the one that the Doctors Jones stole from the Zeppelin in '38.

Nice work.  ;)

Yeah, I didn't respond to this comment, because I already had these in the works.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/GermanHe46G4.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/?action=view&current=GermanHe46G4.jpg)

This one is pretty much the exact scheme from the movie, but it doesn't really make a whole lot of sense.  In 1938, all German aircraft, civilian or military, would have had the Hakenkreuz on the red band on the tail, but somehow the one on the Zeppelin got around this.  Instead, the have the Balkenkreuz on the fuselage.  That was reserved for Luftwaffe aircraft, but the civil code on the side suggests that it wasn't Luftwaffe?  The font is wrong for the codes, etc.  Anyway, it has a lot of basic inaccuracies, which I "corrected" in my own version below.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/GermanHe46G4b.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/?action=view&current=GermanHe46G4b.jpg)

Still within the contextual logic of the movie and the Zeppelin scene, this is a more accurate scheme, though I must admit that the black spars eventually grew on me and I'm kind of sorry to have removed them, although they didn't fit German schemes of the period.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Talos on January 31, 2012, 03:37:32 AM
I should have known you'd be coming out with those. They both look good and, yes, the markings in the movie didn't make much sense to me either. Considering how Jones Senior shot up the tail of the plane, I'm almost surprised they didn't put the Hakenkreuz there. I confess to liking the black spars too!

Now all you need is the Arado trainer painted like a 109...
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: arc3371 on January 31, 2012, 06:47:09 AM
Good looking Heinkels
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on January 31, 2012, 06:57:43 AM
Logan: Nice! Looks really sharp in that splinter camouflage  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 31, 2012, 10:02:53 AM
Thanks for the compliments, everyone!  How about another Last Crusade profile?

Lovely delicate shading and tones.

Love it.

Thanks, Flitzer.  A lot of people may not realize it, but the lighting and shading is actually different on each profile to suit the amount of wear and the type of paint on each plane, so I thank you for noticing it.  A lot of effort goes into even the little details on my profiles, hence my custom title "rivet-counting whiffer".

Considering how Jones Senior shot up the tail of the plane, I'm almost surprised they didn't put the Hakenkreuz there.

Yeah, there was no shortage of swastikas throughout the rest of the movie.  Maybe the Stampe was German-registered or something and they weren't allowed to put one on it?  That's my best guess.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/HatayHe46G1.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/?action=view&current=HatayHe46G1.jpg)

Quote
Shortly after the Republic of Hatay declared independence in the latter half of the 1930s, it began preparing for its own defense.  While most of its armed forces were limited to camels, horses, desert vehicles, and tanks, the small air arm did acquire some aircraft.  The aircraft were primarily acquired from Germany, an early supporter of the new republic.  Ten Heinkel He 46G-1s were procured on a German loan received after granting the Luftwaffe the right of using the Hatay airspace.

Some of the more fantastic tales surrounding this agreement link it to Hitler's obsession with religious artifacts, specifically in the state of Hatay, but these are pure conjecture.  The is no evidence to support these claims, the brief visit by German military advisors in 1938 merely being assistance with a military exercise the Hatay Army was conducting at the time.  The interruption of these exercises by pro-Syrian rebels did not help German attempts to keep their involvement low-profile, as fighting produced casualties on both sides.  Through a combination of bad planning, untrained conscript soldiers, and sheer bad luck, the 1938 exercises became a fiasco.  Some vehicles were damaged by rebels and abandoned, while a tank was lost due to mechanical failure, although one report described it as having driven off a cliff after the driver passed out from heat stroke.  To add insult to injury, Bedouin tribesmen in the area stole a number of horses and camels that were left unguarded at one point during the exercise.  The exercises, already frowned upon by neighboring Turkey and France did not help Hatay's relations with its neighbors and would not be repeated.  Likewise, Germany would end its formal involvement with the Republic of Hatay at this time.

How does the dust look?  Did it come out looking alright?  The camo comes from this vehicle (a fake Kubelwagen), (http://img440.imageshack.us/img440/4360/indy3cit2cv012551gn4.jpg) which I had never realized was even camouflaged due to all the dust on it.  The roundels, flag, etc. all come from the vehicles in the movie, too.  Here's the same plane without the dust layers, so you can see what it looks like with the full color.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/HatayHe46G1b.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/?action=view&current=HatayHe46G1b.jpg)

Well, I hope you all enjoyed the Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade profiles!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on January 31, 2012, 10:31:47 AM
Thanks for the comparison Logan, The dust layer looks great -- especially on the upper surface of the wing!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on January 31, 2012, 11:16:44 AM
Logan, these are incredible, it's this kind of attention to detail that pushes me to improve my own profiles. I admit to being lazy sometimes but your work is definately an inspiration.  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Empty Handed on January 31, 2012, 05:13:15 PM
The Indy-inspired schemes are terrific!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: AXOR on January 31, 2012, 05:19:29 PM
Nice Heinkels Logan,very neat profiles.
What can I say?I'm a fan of your work
Keep up

Alex
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 01, 2012, 12:02:53 AM
Thanks for the comparison Logan, The dust layer looks great -- especially on the upper surface of the wing!

Thanks, apophenia.  I use a lot of the same patterns and filters, I just scale them differently and employ them in different ways.

Logan, these are incredible, it's this kind of attention to detail that pushes me to improve my own profiles. I admit to being lazy sometimes but your work is definately an inspiration.  :)

Your work is gorgeous, Doom, and you were one of the profilers that originally inspired me to start doing profiles at all!  You could say that without the likes of you and Gekko, my profiles wouldn't exist at all.  If my work inspires you at this point, I merely consider it to be giving some of it back.

The Indy-inspired schemes are terrific!

Thanks, Empty Handed!  I have to admit, I REALLY liked writing the "official" explanation of what happened during the Last Crusade.  By the way, I've been loving your recent Republic aircraft, especially the very pretty F4N.

Nice Heinkels Logan,very neat profiles.
What can I say?I'm a fan of your work
Keep up

Thanks, AXU, and I of yours.  I especially loved your Peruvian Yak-2.15.  That just looked right.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Brian da Basher on February 01, 2012, 08:16:00 AM
I hate to tell you Logan, but you belong here. These H-46s prove it!

They're all so sweet I'd be hard pressed to pick a favorite, but I can just imagine all the work that went into that amazing splinter scheme.

Most excellent!

Brian da Basher
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 09, 2012, 02:16:19 PM
In case anybody's wondering, I've gone back to working on the XP-61F.  It wants my soul.  Every square inch of aluminum on that plane fights me.  That being said, I love its looks.  I also fear trying to convert it to work with other profile schemes.  Once I get all the detail work done and get happy with it, I'll need to spend a week just cleaning it up so I can actually work with it.  Right now it really is like a hand-made prototype, nowhere near ready for production.

I do find it ironic how much the art process mirrors real life subject sometimes.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on February 10, 2012, 07:37:47 AM
...I do find it ironic how much the art process mirrors real life subject sometimes...

He he. Keep at 'er Logan. Sometimes these things fight you every inch of the way. But maybe it's less worth the doing if it doesn't? Looking forward to the outcome of your XP-61F wrassling  ;)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Cliffy B on February 10, 2012, 07:44:53 AM
Woooo more P-61s!!!!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Talos on February 10, 2012, 11:05:42 AM
Ugh, that P-61. It was bad enough drawing it the first time, with what I thought were accurate sources. Don't remind me about it.  :-X

*gets back to working on the He 100*  >:(
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 10, 2012, 12:23:19 PM
I've come to realize that the only accurate sources are photos...and even they lie sometimes!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Talos on February 10, 2012, 01:14:45 PM
Yes, I agree with you completely on both parts. Makes the He 280 hard, since I can't find any clearish photos of the BMW 003 installation.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on February 13, 2012, 04:31:38 AM
Back from my holidays I see you are doing a great job with the heinkels! As always splendid in work and finishing touch! My compliments, Logan! :)  But of course I still love your vikings!

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: tsrjoe on February 13, 2012, 07:33:32 PM
beautiful 'Hatay' profiles, i can just imagine such a type being in use  8) a friend (who is a big 'Indy' fan) recently picked up a 1/72 'Retrokit' resin model of the tank, hmm i wonder if i can get her to do an accompanying aircraft model too ?

cheers, Joe
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 14, 2012, 09:37:13 AM
Thanks, guys!  I'm working on some profiles, but they won't yield a finished product for some time yet.  If I get sick of working on the detail stuff, or I just get the urge, I'll probably crank out some more Heinkels and Vikings, but that is looking to be a bit down the road right now.

I hope you had a good time on your vacation, Paul!

Joe, I try to strive for a bit of realism on my alternate history aircraft, so I'm glad even the fantasy types look the part.  The back story for the Hatay He 46 was great fun and actually contains quite a lot of real history.  I've always been a big Indy fan, myself.  We even named our dog "Indiana" (called him "Indy") in reference to the wonderful line from the last movie.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 16, 2012, 02:21:54 PM
Something wicked this way comes.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Scrapbook/He-100-WIP-1.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on February 16, 2012, 04:18:23 PM
wicked and beautiful! :D
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on February 17, 2012, 08:58:12 AM
Ooo, looking forward to this! So, "in the parlance of our times", this is wicked as in baaad, right  :D
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 17, 2012, 01:21:21 PM
How about an update?

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Scrapbook/He-100-WIP-2.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Rafael on February 17, 2012, 09:16:35 PM
Logan I don't know how you do it, but every time you post an evolution like this you make it look easy.....and finish off with a work of art!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 18, 2012, 02:22:37 AM
Thanks, Rafael!  To be honest, it's both very easy and very hard.  I'd compare it to carpentry.  There's no magic involved, no special tools or special materials.  It's just a matter of detail, patience, work, and a good eye.  Anybody can do it, it's all a matter of how much work you put in and how much you check photos, etc.

How about another preview?  Nose, no lines, 50%.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Scrapbook/He-100-WIP-3b.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 18, 2012, 02:35:50 AM
And in case anybody is wondering, there are about 336 layers in the profile as is, 54 of them visible.  And that's before all the paint, markings, etc!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on February 18, 2012, 02:41:44 AM
Wonderful job, Logan! :D
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on February 18, 2012, 02:57:58 AM
Logan, nice work on those exhaust stacks!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on February 18, 2012, 03:43:03 AM
And in case anybody is wondering, there are about 336 layers in the profile as is, 54 of them visible.  And that's before all the paint, markings, etc!

Cheers,

Logan

So what you are saying is that it is a little more than just colouring in... ;)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 18, 2012, 03:56:56 AM
Yeah, when you have 10 total and 3 visible layers dedicated to the welding marks on the exhausts, yeah, it's a bit more than a digital coloring book.   ;)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Flitzer on February 18, 2012, 05:06:44 AM
Beaoootiful.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Cliffy B on February 18, 2012, 05:15:02 AM
Egad Logan!!!!  How big are your Photoshop files (if you use Photoshop)?  I made a few digital paintings back in the day with almost 100 layers and I crashed my computer due to lack of memory, and I had plenty (or so I thought).  What kind of setup are you using?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 18, 2012, 05:54:57 AM
Most of the layers don't have much on them.  The current image is 6815x2600, but the final will be a bit bigger due to the background, etc.  The machine itself is nothing special.  It's a used laptop with 4 GB RAM and Intel dual core i5-520M 2.4GHz, on Windows 7, 64-bit.  I'm using Photoshop CS5 (64-bit).  I had some trouble with it crashing, so I now use an Autosave script every 15 minutes.  Slows things down, but helps my sanity a lot.  The file itself is about 70 MB at the moment.  It should be a little lower when I get it ready for production, though.

Hundreds of layers is pretty standard for me.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on February 18, 2012, 06:04:21 AM
And once we've clapped peepers on an example like those exhaust weld lines, those of us trying our hands at digital colouring books take no offence! Damn that's nice work  :icon_alabanza:
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 18, 2012, 06:27:02 AM
Nonsense, apophenia.  Everyone else here does awesome work.  Who do you think I learned from?  Photoshop hermits on the top of the mountain?  Heck, I live in Florida, we don't even have any mountains.  It's those here that both taught and inspired me to get to the level I'm at today.  Your work is some of the most photo-realistic on the forum, apophenia.  I love your style.

Anyway, back to the salt mines.  Doing the little detail work now.  Canopy tracks, small fairings on the tail, shading on the edges of flight control surfaces, etc.  Talos should be getting me the final lines tonight and I'll be able to bring the whole thing together.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Brian da Basher on February 18, 2012, 07:28:16 AM
Your He-100 is coming along very nicely, Logan!

I always enjoy watching you artists at work!

Brian da Basher
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on February 19, 2012, 07:57:44 AM
Logan: Looking forward to this "with antic-i-pa-tion".  :D

 "Everyone else here does awesome work." Agreed but, I for one, can't cope with more than one layer.  But at least I live close to mountains  ;)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Rafael on February 19, 2012, 08:26:37 AM
At the risk of repeating myself: Impressive work
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: elmayerle on February 19, 2012, 11:13:01 AM
Logan, that's truly gorgeous work.  I don't think I'd get that degree of verisimilitude on a 3D CAD model or the drawing made from it.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 19, 2012, 02:10:01 PM
Thank you all for the wonderful compliments.  I hope the finished profiles live up to them.  How about an update?  It's pretty close to finished, so I may not post another preview.  Next image may just be a finished profile...

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Scrapbook/He-100-WIP-4.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: elmayerle on February 19, 2012, 02:41:17 PM
'Twould need little but polishing to be done up as one of the record-setters.  IIRC, the airframe acquired by the USSR was like that and just had red stars added to it.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on February 19, 2012, 08:59:40 PM
It develops very good! My compliments

Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: JP Vieira on February 25, 2012, 07:17:15 PM
Looking good! Keep it up.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 28, 2012, 01:17:08 PM
Sorry for the delays on this one, guys.  We're still actively working on it.  My partner in crime on this one came down with bubonic plague this weekend, but I thought I'd show you how far it's coming.  Here's a close up of the unfinished product at 100%.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Scrapbook/He-100-WIP-5b.jpg)

Enjoy!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on February 28, 2012, 02:20:41 PM
Just the sneak peek is a work of art in and of itself!  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: AXOR on February 28, 2012, 04:22:59 PM
Increasingly better and more realistic,depth of the rivets looks so good,this style reminds me of Thierry Dekker's profiles.
Good job Logan,keep up!

Alex
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: JP Vieira on February 28, 2012, 04:56:53 PM
Wonderful.
I love sneak peaks... ;)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 29, 2012, 12:14:16 AM
Figured out a new way to do rivets.  You like?

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Scrapbook/He-100-WIP-6b.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Empty Handed on February 29, 2012, 12:20:23 AM
What's German for incredible?!!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on February 29, 2012, 12:54:33 AM
The new embossed rivets look great!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on February 29, 2012, 02:58:45 AM
Unglaublich! (German for incredible). Top Logan! ;)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Empty Handed on February 29, 2012, 03:06:45 AM
^ My fact of the day. Thanks!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Daryl J. on February 29, 2012, 03:38:06 AM
Do I like?
Ja.

Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: AXOR on February 29, 2012, 04:02:06 AM
Figured out a new way to do rivets.  You like?

([url]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Scrapbook/He-100-WIP-6b.jpg[/url])

Cheers,

Logan

Much much better!lLike it

Alex
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on February 29, 2012, 04:09:32 AM
You just love feeding the Rivet Counters don't you...
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: JoseFern on February 29, 2012, 07:56:40 AM
Outstanding job Logan! :icon_alabanza:
Looks like you finally found a workaround to eat an elephant. ;D
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 29, 2012, 08:09:54 AM
Oh, you still have to eat the elephant, I just found some really good seasoning that makes it easier to stomach!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: coops213 on March 04, 2012, 06:46:27 AM
Where's our jaw-drop smiley when you need it? Looks awesome!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 04, 2012, 12:21:36 PM
Thanks so much, Coops!  It's still coming along pretty well, though I haven't had a chance to work on it this weekend.  With any luck, I might get some tomorrow, but we'll see.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: JP Vieira on March 04, 2012, 08:48:18 PM
Nicelly done
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: taiidantomcat on March 04, 2012, 11:58:58 PM
Nice Logan!!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on March 05, 2012, 11:13:37 AM
Damn that' nice work Logan! well done  :)

You just love feeding the Rivet Counters don't you...

Ah, but are those hand-grinder worked rivets meeting Luftwaffe-approved production methods or American-style countersunk rivets? The rivet-counters may be able to tell  ;)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: PantherG on March 06, 2012, 08:47:19 AM
Those pis are amazing....Very good job,Logan :D
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 10, 2012, 02:29:34 PM
Thanks everybody!  It's still coming along pretty well, actually.  The rivets have gone through another couple of revisions.  I added some scratches, dents, etc.  I actually have a lot more dents to throw in, too.

So, want another preview so I can prove I'm still working on it?  Tonight I mainly focused on the spinner and prop details.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Scrapbook/He-100-WIP-7b.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan

Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Flitzer on March 10, 2012, 03:57:26 PM
Figured out a new way to do rivets.  You like?

([url]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Scrapbook/He-100-WIP-6b.jpg[/url])

Cheers,

Logan


Superb.
Like very much...how did you do it? :D
P
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 11, 2012, 01:14:59 AM
Hey, Flitzer, it's actually a combination of techniques, but each rivet is actually a combination of about 5 visible layers: 1 for lighting the actual rivet, 1 for shading the actual rivet, 1 for lighting the dent in the aircraft skin put in by the rivet, 1 for shading the same, and 1 for the weathering the aircraft skin around the rivet where dust could accumulate (this highlights the rivet, too).  For these I mainly use the Bevel and Emboss layer style for the lighting and the Outer Glow layer style for the weathering.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on March 11, 2012, 07:20:03 AM
Beautiful work! Your "Rivet-counting whiffer" personal text must be changed to 'Master of Rivets'!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on March 11, 2012, 07:52:47 AM
I can see where you are going with this...just hurry up would you. >:(
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 11, 2012, 11:47:57 AM
Beautiful work! Your "Rivet-counting whiffer" personal text must be changed to 'Master of Rivets'!

Heh, I don't know about that.  I don't really enjoy doing them, but once you get them right, the whole thing ends up looking better for the effort.

I can see where you are going with this...just hurry up would you. >:(

Heh, I can see the light at the end of the tunnel, but I still have half a dozen things to do on it.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on March 11, 2012, 04:52:36 PM
Thanks everybody!  It's still coming along pretty well, actually.  The rivets have gone through another couple of revisions.  I added some scratches, dents, etc.  I actually have a lot more dents to throw in, too.

So, want another preview so I can prove I'm still working on it?  Tonight I mainly focused on the spinner and prop details.

([url]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Scrapbook/He-100-WIP-7b.jpg[/url])

Cheers,

Logan


Splendid Job! Logan! 8)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on March 12, 2012, 11:41:57 AM
I don't really enjoy doing them, but once you get them right, the whole thing ends up looking better for the effort.

Yep, I can see how this would take days at the coalface! Still, how else could you acheive that level of surface detailing?  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on March 12, 2012, 11:13:06 PM
You've got more detail in your nose section than I squeeze into a whole profile. Looking most excellent!  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Brian da Basher on March 13, 2012, 05:12:40 AM
Your detail work is top-notch, research/museum quality, Logan!

Gotta tip my hat to your skill!

Brian da Basher
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: elmayerle on March 13, 2012, 10:16:17 AM
Shoot, I don't get near as good a result doing a rednering from 3-D CAD models (and CATIA does allow such).  Most excellent and painstaking work, Logan.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Talos on March 14, 2012, 05:30:09 AM
Just wait until you see what Logan and I come up with for some of the detailed parts that are missing from the plane so far. I think you're all going to like what you see.  8) (I just finished some of the line art for it and sent it off)

I still love the weld line on the exhaust. I drool every time I look at it. That was all Logan. Outstanding job!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 15, 2012, 02:03:44 PM
Thanks for all of the compliments, everyone!  It really is flattering, and they do help keep me going at a lot of this otherwise unrewarding detail work.  Just like Patton, "Give George a headline and he's good for another thirty miles."

I thought I'd do a little something new for tonight's preview.  I'd give you a whole piece from moment where it is just line art straight from Talos to finished product, ready for incorporation into the drawing.  I'd have put more detail in this one, but you're not going to see 90% in the finished drawing, anyway, and I wanted to show off Talos' fantastic line art.  This took two nights of work to do.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Scrapbook/Gunsight.gif)

It's a Revi C/12A gunsight.  You can see it's not magic or anything.  Anyone really can do this.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: AXOR on March 15, 2012, 06:24:22 PM
Exquisite !!!  :-*

Alex
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: M.A.D on March 15, 2012, 07:05:44 PM
Wow that's some serious detail Logan!!

M.A.D
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Talos on March 15, 2012, 11:49:12 PM
Excellent work, Logan. I was drooling over the shading and coloring you were doing on the sight over the past two nights. It's an entire profile in and of itself, isn't it?

That's about maybe the top third of the gunsight that anyone can see. I ended up detailing about another third, and the bottom third was just the basic shapes. I drew it completely separately (and in large scale!) from the rest of the plane, so I didn't know how much the control panel would be covering.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 17, 2012, 12:41:55 AM
Thanks, everyone!  It's starting to come together, now.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Scrapbook/He-100-WIP-8b.jpg)

First attempt at random scratches, initial paint chipping, etc.  I need a round of rivet paint chipping and leading edge paint chipping, but then weathering should be largely finished.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Empty Handed on March 17, 2012, 12:52:21 AM
Aye carumba! Think I'll retire and take up flower arranging or something!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Rafael on March 17, 2012, 01:49:30 AM
Aye carumba! Think I'll retire and take up flower arranging or something!

I recommend taking up knitting. Being amongst such talented artists prompted me to subscribe to "Knitting Monthly" in spanish, por favor.

Logan this is serious art, man. The care and dedication shows. I don't care counting rivets as long as they're so exquisitely detailed.
Oh, and thanks for the animation from Talos' artwork to your rendering. That was very illustrative
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on March 17, 2012, 08:21:32 AM
Meh ... neither flower-arranging nor a subscription to El Hacer Punto Monthly appeals. Time to just kick back with the bowl of popcorn and watch the show  ;)  Go Logan!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: JP Vieira on March 17, 2012, 05:40:04 PM
Very good
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 21, 2012, 10:01:43 AM
Bah, nonsense you lot!  There's more than one way to do profiles and I love the work each of you do.  Your methods are certainly more prolific than my own if this He 100 is anything to go by.

It is VERY near to completion, however.  Talos can attest to how it's coming along, as he is the only one that can see the WIPs I produce on a near daily basis.  He's just got a few more pieces to give me and then I'll be done.  Watch this space!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Empty Handed on March 21, 2012, 11:16:28 PM
Consider this space watched! Turns out I'm useless at flower-arranging btw! I have 10 black thumbs!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 28, 2012, 01:54:05 AM
Finally done!

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/GermanHe100D2.jpg) (http://fc02.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2012/087/2/e/adolf_galland__s_he_100d_2_n_by_comradeloganov-d4u7rcl.png)

   By 1938, it was becoming clear that, given the same engine, the Heinkel He 100 would out-perform the Messerschmitt Bf 109 in maximum speed, range, and altitude.  As a result, the Reichsluftfahrtministerium decided to get the most out of the limited supply of Daimler-Benz DB 601 engines available.  Priority was given to the He 100 while Messerschmitt received the balance.  The Heinkel He 100D soon entered full-scale production, the first units receiving their aircraft in early 1939.  By spring of 1940, the Bf 109 remained the backbone of the Jagdwaffe, but the He 100 was quickly replacing it in front line units.  By the invasion of France, the He 100 would comprise roughly half of the fighters in Jagdgeschwader stationed on the Western Front.  The He 100 cut large swathes through French and British fighters opposing it, making aces out of many of its pilots during the campaign.

   One such pilot was the flamboyant Adolf Galland.  A veteran of Spain, Galland mentored under fellow Condor Legion veteran and accomplished ace Werner Mölders, quickly becoming an ace and leader in his own right.  After scoring 14 kills flying the He 100 with JG 27, Galland took command of III./JG 26.  He would remain with JG 26 throughout the Battle of Britain, achieving dozens of kills throughout the summer in the skies over Britain.  The He 100 had greater range than the Bf 109, effectively making it the only escort for German bombers over London.  Despite the successes of German fighter pilots, bomber losses continued to mount and Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring eventually ordered the Jagdgeschwader to remain close to the bombers they were escorting.  As Galland recalled:

Quote from: Adolf Galland
   We had the impression that, whatever we did, we were bound to be wrong. Fighter protection for bombers created many problems which had to be solved in action. Bomber pilots preferred close screening in which their formation was surrounded by pairs of fighters pursuing a zigzag course. Obviously, the visible presence of the protective fighters gave the bomber pilots a greater sense of security. However, this was a faulty conclusion, because a fighter can only carry out this purely defensive task by taking the initiative in the offensive. He must never wait until attacked because he then loses the chance of acting.

   We fighter pilots certainly preferred the ‘free chase during the approach and over the target area’. This gives the greatest relief and the best protection for the bomber force, although not perhaps a sense of security for the latter.


   Obviously, the advantages of the He 100 over the British fighters such as the Spitfire were greatly marginalized under such circumstances and losses began to mount.  While the large daylight raids by German bombers began to wind down near the end of October, German fighters continued to engage RAF fighters in large-scale combat throughout 1940 and into 1941.  The speed of the He 100 meant that it could engage in combat and disengage almost at will.  Its range also allowed the He 100 considerable time over Britain to seek out RAF fighters.  In this environment, Galland found great success, scoring over 60 kills before the year was out.

   This profile depicts Galland’s personal He 100D-2/N as it appeared in late 1940.  The /N sub-type of the He 100 was powered by the 1,270 hp DB 601N, an uprated version of the DB 601A used in earlier Doras.  The new engine had flattened instead of concave piston heads for improved compression, produced an additional 75 hp at altitude, and used 100 octane C3 synthetic fuel.  Also seen is Galland’s distinctive telescope, used to distinguish friend from foe at greater range.  Behind the cockpit is the additional armor installed behind the pilot’s seat, a feature that would save Galland’s life in 1941.  Finally, painted under the cockpit is Galland’s personal emblem, Mickey Mouse, used by Galland since the Spanish Civil War.

I hope it was worth the wait!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: AXOR on March 28, 2012, 02:24:08 AM
E X Q U I S I T E !!! The result is fantastic...I'm curious how many layers you used on this profile  ;D
Well done,Logan!

Alex
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on March 28, 2012, 02:27:45 AM
Outstanding!  Any chance of a larger version - would make a great poster!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Talos on March 28, 2012, 02:30:19 AM
*stretches* I'm glad we got that one done. I don't think I've ever put that much detail into a single piece of line art before. Logan, you're a harsh taskmaster and it made me better at what I do.

This came out well.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on March 28, 2012, 02:32:21 AM
*stretches* I'm glad we got that one done.

Now...about that other one...you know the one I mean...bet you thought I had forgotten! C:-)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Talos on March 28, 2012, 03:07:33 AM

Now...about that other one...you know the one I mean...bet you thought I had forgotten! C:-)

Eh, which one?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Rafael on March 28, 2012, 03:16:06 AM
Logan and Talos, you two make a most awesome pair!!!
I love collaborative work.
Kudos on you two gentlemen

Rafa
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on March 28, 2012, 04:14:07 AM
Beautiful job Gentlemen!  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on March 28, 2012, 05:14:20 AM

Now...about that other one...you know the one I mean...bet you thought I had forgotten! C:-)


Eh, which one?


This one bring back any memories...comrade?

(http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/ee312/Talos5/th_X-02-1.jpg) (http://s229.photobucket.com/albums/ee312/Talos5/?action=view&current=X-02-1.jpg)

Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 28, 2012, 07:11:23 AM
E X Q U I S I T E !!! The result is fantastic...I'm curious how many layers you used on this profile  ;D
Well done,Logan!

Thanks, Alex!  On this image itself, there are about 200 layers, but the lighting, shading, weathering, and line art were all compressed to single layers.  I still have the originals for those and if I add them in, it's closer to about 1000 layers that went into this.  The file size is about 160 mb.  It crept over 200 mb a few times and I kept having to merge, compress, and trim my way back down to reasonable levels each time.


Outstanding!  Any chance of a larger version - would make a great poster!

Sure.  Just click on the image below and it will take you to the 100% one that I uploaded on DeviantArt.  I'll also link to the page itself where it's displayed. (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/#/d4u7rcl)  Let me know if you actually want to do a print of it.  I can give it to you on a white background instead, etc. (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/White/GermanHe100D2.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/GermanHe100D2.jpg) (http://fc02.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2012/089/a/1/adolf_galland__s_he_100d_2_n_by_comradeloganov-d4u7rcl.png)


*stretches* I'm glad we got that one done. I don't think I've ever put that much detail into a single piece of line art before. Logan, you're a harsh taskmaster and it made me better at what I do.

This came out well.

Indeed.  As small and "conventional" as the actual aircraft is, I really do like the way it turned out.  Well worth the long hours we both put into it.


Logan and Talos, you two make a most awesome pair!!!
I love collaborative work.
Kudos on you two gentlemen

Thanks, Rafael.  It really is a great partnership.  He likes doing the things I hate and vice versa.  We definitely push each other to produce better and better work, too.


Beautiful job Gentlemen!  :-*

Thanks, Doom!  I'm glad you like it.  Did you look at the 100% one, too?

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on March 28, 2012, 08:56:17 AM
Did you look at the 100% one, too?

If not, do! It will give you a warm, tingley feeling  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on March 28, 2012, 04:00:15 PM
Wonderful job! Logan! Outstanding  :) Could you send me one with a white background? Much appreciated  :D

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on March 29, 2012, 01:36:31 AM
You better believe I looked at the 100% image. I'm still blown away by how nice this is, would make a beautiful print.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 29, 2012, 11:13:16 AM
Did you look at the 100% one, too?


If not, do! It will give you a warm, tingley feeling  :-*


You better believe I looked at the 100% image. I'm still blown away by how nice this is, would make a beautiful print.


Thanks, guys.  It really does look more accurate at that level.  The scaling does cause some issues in appearance.

Wonderful job! Logan! Outstanding  :) Could you send me one with a white background? Much appreciated  :D


Sure.  Do you want one like this, (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/White/GermanHe100D2.jpg) or just like the normal one but on white instead of blue gradient?

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on March 29, 2012, 06:07:57 PM
Wonderful job! Logan! Outstanding  :) Could you send me one with a white background? Much appreciated  :D


Sure.  Do you want one like this, (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/White/GermanHe100D2.jpg) or just like the normal one but on white instead of blue gradient?

Cheers,

Logan
[/quote]

Hi Logan,

I like the first one you propose! Thanks!

Regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 30, 2012, 09:00:06 AM
Great!  Let me know if you need it modified at all.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on March 31, 2012, 01:56:48 AM
Great!  Let me know if you need it modified at all.

Cheers,

Logan

Hi Logan,

It's okay this way. It doesn't need modifying

regards
lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 14, 2012, 01:40:53 PM
Click on the image to see it at 100%.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/GermanHe100D1.jpg) (http://fc00.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2012/104/e/6/heinkel_he_100d_1_greif_by_comradeloganov-d4w73co.png)

After its rejection by the RLM, the He 100 became the focus of an intense propaganda campaign designed to deceive the Allies into believing the He 100 was in service with the Luftwaffe.  Largely successful, this effort culminated in the famous April 1940 article of Der Adler.  No fewer than nine He 100s were painted in spurious "lightning bolt" markings and lined up for the cameras.  It wasn't long before these same aircraft were repainted with a shield bearing a bicorn hat stuck on a dagger, an apparent stab at Winston Churchill, the former First Lord of the Admiralty.  Finally, at least one aircraft was painted with a moon-man marking and photographed in an apparent night-fighting role.

When its services as a propaganda tool were concluded, a number of these He 100s were added to Heinkel's semi-private factory defense force, manned by Heinkel company pilots.  Sometime after these aircraft were taken on for use in this role, the 'First Lord of the Admiralty' badges were repainted with a griffin, the traditional coat of arms of Rostock, where the Heinkel plant was located.  This can be seen in an aerial shot of the plant taken later in 1940 as published in Erwin Hood's fantastic book on the He 100.  It is one of these aircraft that is depicted in the profile.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Scrapbook/Hoodscan2.png)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Scrapbook/Hoodscan1.png)

And here's the full build thread. (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=1233.0)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Flitzer on April 14, 2012, 03:33:18 PM
Stunning.
Love it to death.

P :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: AXOR on April 14, 2012, 05:28:04 PM
w a w  :-* looks fantastic!!!!
I really like the idea with underside Balkenkreuz centered !

Alex
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on April 14, 2012, 07:17:03 PM
Splendid profile! 8)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 15, 2012, 10:02:24 AM
Thanks, Flitzer & lauhof!

w a w  :-* looks fantastic!!!!
I really like the idea with underside Balkenkreuz centered !

Thanks, Alex!  The Balkenkreuz is just the way the Germans did it when they prettied them up for pictures.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: coolusername on April 17, 2012, 11:32:10 AM
Logan, i've been following your He 100 since the day Sean started laying down the boiler plate, we talk about it almost everyday. Those profiles are astounding :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on May 08, 2012, 11:22:21 AM
Click on the image to see it at 100%.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/B-51%20Panther/900px/ArgentinianPanther1.jpg) (http://fc09.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2012/128/6/3/argentinian_martin_b_51b_panther___falklands_1982_by_comradeloganov-d4z0i2x.jpg)

When the Fuerza Aérea Argentina began looking to replace its Avro Lancasters and Lincolns, it looked at various bomber and attack aircraft, but the Martin B-51 Panther quickly proved to be the standout candidate.  A number of factors ended up pushing the selection of the Panther such as an aggressive marketing campaign by Martin, the ready availability of surplus B-51Bs from the USAF, its acquisition by other South American air forces, and delays in the competition.

Although a large and complicated aircraft, the Panther was accurate, maneuverable, and very fast at low level.  When Argentine forces occupied the Falkland Islands in April of 1982, the United Kingdom dispatched a naval force to retake the islands from Argentinian forces.  Flying from the Argentinian mainland, the range of the "Panteras" allowed them to strike Royal Navy ships near the islands.  A number of aircraft were lost in these attacks, but Argentine pilots continued to press home the attacks, taking advantage of the B-51's speed at extremely low level.  Despite faulty fuzes that left unexploded bombs lodged in British ships as often as not, by the end of the conflict, the Panthers of the Argentinian Air Force sank or damaged no fewer than seven British ships.

The aircraft depicted in the profile was responsible for the sinking of the HMS Coventry on 25 May 1982.  Here she is depicted some time after the attack, with yellow recognition markings and two kills for ships claimed in attacks.

Build thread here.  "Argentinian B-51B Panther Build Thread - Falklands 1982" (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=1358.0)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on May 09, 2012, 07:21:15 AM
Lovely work as always, Comrade Loganov  :)

 Wouldn't a Panthera argentinus be named 'Jaguar'?  Hmmm, maybe not, could get confusing when RAF Jags show up  ;D
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on May 10, 2012, 04:45:48 AM
Thanks!  I thought about "Jaguar" (I am in Jacksonville, after all), but there is a word in Spanish for "panther" so I decided to just keep it simple.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: RussC on May 10, 2012, 10:30:28 AM
Amazing detail and presentation, Logan. You've done it again !
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on May 20, 2012, 09:42:57 AM
Click on the image to see it at 100%.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/B-51%20Panther/900px/ArgentinianPanther2.jpg) (http://fc03.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2012/140/3/3/argentinian_martin_b_51b_panther___falklands_1982_by_comradeloganov-d50idqj.jpg)

Delays in acquiring A-4 Skyhawks for the Fuerza Aérea Argentina saw them instead deciding to purchase additional Panthers.  These B-51Bs, like the previous group, were ex-USAF with a retractable refueling probe in the nose, something that Argentina would put to use in their attacks on Royal Navy off the Falklands in 1982.  These new B-51Bs were all assigned to Grupo 4.  During the war, they would conduct numerous bombing missions, albeit less successful than those performed by Grupo 5.  They would also suffer a greater proportion of losses during the conflict.  C-321 was one of the aircraft that took part in the controversial raid on the HMS Invincible on May 30, 1982.

The aircraft has a kill marking for the Invincible on the nose and yellow recognition markings overpainted with blue at this point.

Build thread here.  "Argentinian B-51B Panther Build Thread - Falklands 1982" (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=1358.msg18341#msg18341)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Empty Handed on May 22, 2012, 09:23:03 PM
Lovin' the camo on that!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: finsrin on May 23, 2012, 01:00:23 PM
B-51 subject, great choice.   Like C-321 camo.   :)
If there was a 1/48 B-51, could build it as large 1/72 bomber.
If there was a 1/72 B-51, could at least up-engine, etc...
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on May 23, 2012, 06:59:03 PM
Well there is/was the 1/48 Collect-aire kit...but I have seen more Hen's teeth then that...
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 10, 2012, 03:02:04 PM
All the way back from Page 4!  Enough thread necromancy that I even got a warning from the board as I wrote this post!

Here's my first finished entry for this GB, a Condor Legion He 100D-1 coded 8●14 and flown by Leutnant Werner Ursinus of 2.J/88.  Click on the image to see it at 100%.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/SpanishHe100D1.jpg) (http://fc00.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2012/314/0/0/heinkel_he_100d_1_condor_legion_by_comradeloganov-d5kmave.png)

Spain would serve as the baptism of fire for the He 100, but the Bf 109 would take the lion's share of the Condor Legion's kills in the conflict.  By the time the He 100 was introduced, the majority of Republican aircraft had been swept from the sky by the German experten.  Only enough He 100s were delivered to equip the 2. Staffel of J/88 before war's end.  It was assigned the aircraft code "8", previously used by the Condor Legion's He 112s, the Nationalist Air Force having used the code of "5" for its He 112s.  This was likely an attempt to confuse Western sources regarding the He 100's true nature, some aircraft still being referred to as He 112Us in the press.

Flown by Leutnant Werner Ursinus of 2.J/88, this He 100D-1 coded 8●14 had the name "Bärchen" painted in white below the cockpit.  "Ursinus" means "bear" in Latin and the German for "Teddy Bear" is "Bärchen".  Ursinus did not claim any victories with 2.J/88 in Spain but later went on to serve with JG 53 in France, the Battle of Britain and Russia.  Ursinus led 3./JG 53 until the end of August 1941 when he took over the Ergänzungsstaffel of JG 53.  He survived the war as an instructor.

Click here to view the full build thread.  Condor Legion He 100D-1 Build Thread - Spanish Civil War (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=2200.0)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Glanini on November 10, 2012, 05:30:45 PM
Wonderful, love it, both the profile and the story, this is what this forum is made of ! :) :) :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on November 10, 2012, 06:12:04 PM
Outstanding as always Logan, very good job!   :-*

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: arc3371 on November 11, 2012, 06:50:28 AM
Great He-100
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Acree on November 11, 2012, 09:01:22 AM
Very NICE, Logan.  I've always been fond of the He-100
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 12, 2012, 07:05:35 AM
Thanks for the kind words, all!  I appreciate it!  I'll be trying to get at least another one done this GB.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: elmayerle on November 12, 2012, 09:22:12 AM
That's an excellent profile and backstory and I'm looking forward to more.  I have to wonder how the He100D would have evolved over time in regard to engines and armament.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on November 13, 2012, 12:53:05 AM
Logan, I am still blown away at the amount of detail when you view the full size art (and I do mean ART!). Very nice. (http://www.doomisland2.com/images/avatars/3771.gif) (http://www.doomisland2.com/images/avatars/wub1.gif)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 13, 2012, 07:22:10 AM
Thanks, Doom!  When are you going to post some more profiles?

I have to wonder how the He100D would have evolved over time in regard to engines and armament.

Talos and I hope to answer some of those questions in time, but that's easier said than done!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on November 13, 2012, 07:42:18 AM
Talos and I hope to answer some of those questions in time, but that's easier said than done!

Looking forward to that!  Great work on the Condor Legion Heinkel Logan!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on November 14, 2012, 01:17:44 AM
Thanks, Doom!  When are you going to post some more profiles?
Cheers,

Logan
As soon as the inspiration and extra time stars come back into alignment  ;D
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 14, 2012, 11:41:43 AM
Thanks, apophenia!

As soon as the inspiration and extra time stars come back into alignment  ;D

I've been there!  Thankfully they just came into alignment about a week ago!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 14, 2012, 11:43:14 AM
Here's my second finished entry for this GB, Werner Schröer's Heinkel He 100D-2 Trop, WNr 4170 'White 11' as it appeared on 21 April, 1941.  Notice the Trop filter on the wing that Talos made for this profile.  Click on the image to view it at 100%.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/GermanHe100D3.jpg) (http://fc01.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2012/318/9/c/werner_schroer__s_heinkel_he_100d_2_trop___afrika___by_comradeloganov-d5l1eh0.png)

Werner Schröer was an excellent fighter leader and one of the few 'Experten' to serve throughout the entire war and survive.  Born on 12 December 1918, he joined the Luftwaffe in 1937 as a groundcrew member.  By May 1940 he had soloed, and he joined 2./JG 27 in August 1940 but did not see action during the Battle of Britain.  Schröer was to find his greatest fame with JG 27 as they moved south to join Rommel's Afrika Korps.  He claimed his first victory, an RAF Hurricane, on 19 April 1941 but his own aircraft was heavily damaged in the engagement.  Two days later, he again entered combat with Hurricanes and collided with one in the fight which ensued; this necessitated a forced landing at Ain-El-Gazala with his He 100D-2 Trop, WNr 4170 'White 11' incurring 40% damage.  By the end of 1941 his score stood at seven.  Schröer went on to achieve 114 victories, and finished the war as Kommodore of JG 3 'Udet'.  Schröer was also a recipient of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords.  Werner Schröer was arguably the greatest pilot of the Mediterranean theatre after the inimitable Hans-Joachim Marseille.  He passed away in Munich on 10 February 1985.

This profile depicts Schröer's Heinkel He 100D-2 Trop, WNr 4170 'White 11' as it appeared on 21 April, 1941.  It is believed that this aircraft was re-camouflaged in Sicily and that for early desert schemes such as this, which first appeared as early as April 1941, stocks of Italian paints were used. Note the weathered, dirty white outline to the fuselage cross compared to the new white of the fuselage band and code number, indicating that the aircraft had seen some service before the desert camouflage and band were applied.

Here's an alternate take on the profile with a tail camouflage that more closely matches the 109 schemes seen at the time.  Aesthetically, I don't like it quite as much as the first one that I posted, but what do you guys think?

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/GermanHe100D3b.jpg)

Click here to view the full build thread.  Werner Schröer's He 100D-2 Trop Build Thread - JG 27 'Afrika' (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=2224.0)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: elmayerle on November 14, 2012, 11:57:58 AM
Personally, I agree; I like the first one the most.  I'd love to see comparative plan views which would show the tropical filter better.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 14, 2012, 12:12:37 PM
You'll have to ask Talos for that.  ;)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Talos on November 14, 2012, 09:40:40 PM
Don't look at me!

From the top, it's just a rounded rectangle that hugs the shape of the inlet. Because of Heinkel's design style, I wanted to make one that blended in with the wing's shape better then, say, a Bf 109 or Hurricane's did with the nose.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on November 14, 2012, 11:36:26 PM
Nice!  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: elmayerle on November 15, 2012, 01:44:17 AM
Don't look at me!

From the top, it's just a rounded rectangle that hugs the shape of the inlet. Because of Heinkel's design style, I wanted to make one that blended in with the wing's shape better then, say, a Bf 109 or Hurricane's did with the nose.
::chuckle::  I can live with that.  I was just interested because I've been involved with a few such installations.  They are rathr fascinating items in detail.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Talos on November 15, 2012, 02:45:57 AM
Yeah, they can be. The one I put on the He 100 has a retractable cover with the filter element behind it and ahead of the normal inlet, so it isn't as simple as it looks, just an uncluttered installation.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on November 15, 2012, 12:03:59 PM
Lovely work guys! Logan: on the camouflage, the top version looks cooler but the bottom version would probably work better.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on November 16, 2012, 04:15:55 PM
The first one is top, Logan !! :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 19, 2012, 02:36:13 PM
With any luck, this will be my 3rd entry for the Clear Your Bench GB.  I won't create a thread for it until it's done, though.  It's been over 2 years since I've touched it, but I REALLY want to finish it this time.  I've basically finished the center fuselage at this point, but I probably won't get much of a chance to work on the booms until after this week as I'll be traveling for Thanksgiving.  This is only at 50% size, even after you click on it, but you should get an appreciation for the detail in it.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/In%20Progress/Preview/th_P-61-profile-WIP-4.jpg) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/In%20Progress/Preview/P-61-profile-WIP-4.jpg)

For all intents and purposes, this is identical to the center fuselage of the second XP-61E prototype.  Let me know if there are any questions.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: bluesman on November 19, 2012, 11:28:52 PM
Logan, that's looking good.

How about a tut on how to do bare metal like that? I do a fair job, but I can do better.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on November 20, 2012, 12:45:01 AM
You were right....after clicking I got an appreciation for it.  ;)   Lookin' very good, I hope the profiling gods bless you with an open schedule and ambition, can't wait to see this one completed.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Talos on November 20, 2012, 03:03:26 AM
It's really coming along great, though we still have a lot of work to do on it. I've said it before and I'll say it again, your metal textures are phenomenal here.

Ugh, every time I look at the line art though, I cringe. I've improved by leaps and bounds since then in both technique and research. Especially research, not trusting any source completely besides period photographs.

That said, we should have some spectacular profiles come out of this.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 30, 2012, 01:33:49 PM
Well, I just finished the rivets on the engine area, firewall, and wing fairing to my satisfaction.  Now I start on the rest of the boom from the panel line roughly below the wing spar back.  That's still a lot of work to do.  The REALLY good news is that it's the best documented part of the aircraft in my photographs.  I should be able to get all the rivet lines accurately.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: arc3371 on November 30, 2012, 11:19:58 PM
Great profiles as usual
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on December 01, 2012, 06:53:44 AM
Yep. And, as Talos said, "your metal textures are phenomenal"!  Now on to those booms  >:(
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 01, 2012, 11:48:15 AM
So, in case anyone cares, there's a major tail boom panel line that is incorrect on the overwhelming majority of P-61 line art, all of which depict a line that essentially isn't there on the actual aircraft.

I'm spending tonight depicting that correctly.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 01, 2012, 01:08:50 PM
Here's a preview of what I'm working on at the moment.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/In%20Progress/Preview/P-61-profile-WIP-6-boom.jpg)

Anyone want to take a guess at how many layers there are in the whole profile at the time I took this preview WIP?  Fair warning, the overwhelming majority are not visible and will be merged before I make the first profile in order to keep the file size down.  Still, I've used every layer at some point in the creation of the profile so each of them make it into the final product in one way or another.

If someone can get within 10% of the actual number of layers, I'll do a profile of their choice (assuming no airframe modifications since those take forever).

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: finsrin on December 01, 2012, 01:17:04 PM
8
Is a W.A.G. know nothing about it.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Cliffy B on December 01, 2012, 01:22:45 PM
20-35?  I sure hope you label your layers as you go, I'm speaking from experience here.  Nothing sucks more than trying to figure out what "Layer 19" was when you click it on and off and don't see anything change at all only to copy and paste and find its some minor little detail you forgot about.


BTW, did you decide on a tablet yet?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 01, 2012, 01:44:52 PM
You're both very low.  I group my layers, color code them, and name the groups.  I also name the individual layers as necessary.  I'm able to keep them decently well sorted by doing that.

As for a tablet, I haven't made a decision yet.  I'm thinking about one of the cheaper Wacom Bamboo Create tablets recommended by a family of graphic artists I go to church with.  Anyone here have any experience with the Bamboo line?

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Talos on December 01, 2012, 03:58:50 PM
You're both very low.  I group my layers, color code them, and name the groups.  I also name the individual layers as necessary.  I'm able to keep them decently well sorted by doing that.

As for a tablet, I haven't made a decision yet.  I'm thinking about one of the cheaper Wacom Bamboo Create tablets recommended by a family of graphic artists I go to church with.  Anyone here have any experience with the Bamboo line?

Cheers,

Logan

I have one actually, from the last generation a couple years back...

And let me guess, a hundred/hundred and fifty?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Jeremak on December 01, 2012, 08:16:36 PM
Quote
Anyone want to take a guess at how many layers there are in the whole profile at the time I took this preview WIP?
about 10-15 for rivet and panel lines weathering, 2-4 for rivets and lines, 6-16 for highlights, and maybe another 10 for shadows, 4 just for colwling and lamps, 10-20 for bare metal texture... This give from  circa 35 to 70 layers.
Quote
Nothing sucks more than trying to figure out what "Layer 19" was when you click it on and off and don't see anything change at all only to copy and paste and find its some minor little detail you forgot about.
Thats why i name them: wheel, wheel highlights, wheel shadow, tyre, lamp, wheathering this, wheatering that.. etc.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: elmayerle on December 02, 2012, 01:07:39 AM
You're both very low.  I group my layers, color code them, and name the groups.  I also name the individual layers as necessary.  I'm able to keep them decently well sorted by doing that.

As for a tablet, I haven't made a decision yet.  I'm thinking about one of the cheaper Wacom Bamboo Create tablets recommended by a family of graphic artists I go to church with.  Anyone here have any experience with the Bamboo line?

Cheers,

Logan
That sounds very much like using layers in CATIA V4 at work.  We have a definite convention to follow with respect to what goes where and it's very necessary with so many designers.  I'll hazard a WAG of 254 which is what that system is set up for.  Do you perhaps set up like several major companies do with a model layer map in each model (Yes, Bell does that and I know Boeing and what's currently Hawker-Beechcraft(soon, apparently to be Beechcraft as the jets are sold off) do - LM-Aero doesn't but conventions are enforced in the Check process).

Beyond that, the work looks great.  Having, and still doing, my share of fastener detailing - nutplates, rivets, screws, bolts, washers, etc., I know just how laborious it can be but how necessary it is to do properly.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 02, 2012, 01:50:11 AM
Quote
Anyone want to take a guess at how many layers there are in the whole profile at the time I took this preview WIP?

about 10-15 for rivet and panel lines weathering, 2-4 for rivets and lines, 6-16 for highlights, and maybe another 10 for shadows, 4 just for colwling and lamps, 10-20 for bare metal texture... This give from  circa 35 to 70 layers.

You have the right idea, but you've way low-balled my current count on rivet lines.  Also, you're estimate would be closer if we were just talking visible layeres, but a lot of layers go into those 16 visible lighting layers, for instance.  Finally, you're close on one part of the boom, but not the whole drawing.

Beyond that, the work looks great.  Having, and still doing, my share of fastener detailing - nutplates, rivets, screws, bolts, washers, etc., I know just how laborious it can be but how necessary it is to do properly.


Thanks, you're not kidding about how laborious it can be.  Fortunately I do take comfort in the fact that even when I guess wrong, this is still the most accurate P-61 boom profiled that I've ever seen.  Also, given the couple hundred dollars worth of P-61 books I've accumulated for the project and I still don't have the detail I need, I can safely say that the only people that could call me out on my mistakes either have direct access to a P-61C up close (both of which I've seen in person myself, too), or access to a large stash of unpublished photographs of bare metal P-61s (unlikely).

As for the layer count, [ur=http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,20962.msg580445.html#msg580445]perttime has had the closest guess for the whole thing over on the What If forums with ~1,500 layers[/url].  Still a little low, but he's definitely close.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: elmayerle on December 02, 2012, 06:16:34 AM
And that's why we can overlay models in design, to keep within the Layer restrictions of the system.  I suspect you may hit system requirements restrictions at some point as I know that if I overlay too many, or too dense, models, the system starts to get "balky". 
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 02, 2012, 06:36:57 AM
Yeah, I understand.  I always eliminate the unnecessary layers and consolidate the visible ones into as few as possible.  When I finish this one, I'll probably be a bit over 2000 layers.  I'll try to consolidate that down to a few hundred when I prep it for the first couple of profiles.

Thanks,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 02, 2012, 02:37:28 PM
As I said on Arc's thread, I'm still driving myself crazy one rivet at a time with this P-61.  Just the aft portion of the boom and the vertical tail to go!

Update for tonight:

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/In%20Progress/Preview/P-61-profile-WIP-7-boom.jpg)

As for the layers, I'm going to give it to pert with his guess of 1500.  The actual number of layers when I asked?  1851.  Now it's probably closer to 1900, maybe a bit over.  It'll be well over 2000 by the time it's done, but I'll try to consolidate it to closer to 10% of that when I convert it to "production" mode.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Empty Handed on December 02, 2012, 08:12:14 PM
Blimey! That's incredibly impressive!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: bluesman on December 02, 2012, 11:21:08 PM
Coming along nicely

On tablets, Wacom is the standard, the bamboo line is very good. You can get a decent bamboo tablet for 99 bucks. I have an older wacom, and its workign fine and does the job.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 05, 2012, 02:11:59 PM
Thanks, folks.  Want to see what I'm working on now?  This is the piece I've got to do:

(http://www.maam.org/p61/images/MVC-001F9.JPG)

(http://www.maam.org/p61/images/Boom3F.JPG)

...and here's what I did:

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/In%20Progress/Preview/P-61-profile-WIP-8b-boom.jpg)

...and with lighting & shading:

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/In%20Progress/Preview/P-61-profile-WIP-8-boom.jpg)

It's coming along.  Now I just need to do the tail.

Unfortunately, I fear that I'm turning into this.

http://www.anyclip.com/movies/the-aviator/the-rivets-must-be-flush/ (http://www.anyclip.com/movies/the-aviator/the-rivets-must-be-flush/)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 09, 2012, 11:09:11 AM
You guys want another WIP to see how much is involved in all these rivets and to get a look an inside glimpse into how it looks when I work on one of these?

And some of you modelers think you have messy workbenches!

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/In%20Progress/Preview/TailWIP1.png)

By the way, if you don't get the reference to the current thread/post subject, just watch this (go to 22:11):

http://youtu.be/YRD4gb0p5RM?t=22m11s (http://youtu.be/YRD4gb0p5RM?t=22m11s)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: elmayerle on December 09, 2012, 11:26:59 AM
I've always loved that particular cartoon.  It's right up there with "What's Opera Doc?" on my all-time favorites list.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on December 09, 2012, 11:54:40 PM
Logan, I think one of your rivets needed to be rotated 10 degrees.  ;D    This is looking mighty fine!  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on December 10, 2012, 05:30:14 AM
Clockwise...not counter-clockwise... ;)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Cliffy B on December 10, 2012, 07:35:22 AM
They're also about 0.25mm too big, please re-scale immediately  >:(

You're doing a fine aircraft a whole lot of justice, keep it up!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on December 11, 2012, 05:52:14 AM
They're also about 0.25mm too big, please re-scale immediately...

Yeah but has any rivet experten actually counted them all yet?  >:D
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on December 11, 2012, 04:21:29 PM
Nah!  We don't count rivets here...criticise the size, shape, orientation, yes.  But count?  No!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Alvis 3.1 on December 12, 2012, 01:58:22 AM
43,211, 43,212, 43,213, 43umm...awwwwww nuts!




1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8......



Alvis 3.1
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 12, 2012, 02:05:56 PM
Yeah but has any rivet experten actually counted them all yet?  >:D


Oh please, nobody had better.  There's a number of areas where I know for a fact they're wrong.  Thankfully I also know that there's not too many souls that are intrepid (or masochistic) enough to prove it!

Likewise, when I reduce it to the 25% or so that it will be displayed at, you'll not be able to make any of them out, but they'll definitely influence the eventual look of the profile regardless.

(http://www.maam.org/p61/images/LH-Fin.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/In%20Progress/Preview/P-61-profile-WIP-9b-tail.jpg)

Anyway, I am on the home stretch at this point.  As long as I can find Howland, I shouldn't have any issue.  I need to do one more line of rivets on the back edge of the tail, the ~40 or so cluster of rivets around each(!) of the round panels on the aircraft, some rudder detail, the fabric rudder covering (and associated lighting/shading), the lighting/shading on the tail & rudder, the natural metal finish panels on the boom & tail, and finally the lighting & shading of the rivets on the boom.  That may sound like a lot, but it should only be another week or two.  I'm still on track for the Clear Your Bench GB, but we'll see if I can do it without an extension or not!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 13, 2012, 01:13:12 PM
I got more done tonight than I thought I would.

I need to do:


Mainly it's just the rudder I have left.  Fortunately it won't be as complex as I originally feared.  A lot of the detailed (rivets, etc) was all covered by fabric.  Another night or two, then the additional detail on the tail and rudder.

(http://farm1.staticflickr.com/93/232154721_a6d290f491_o.jpg)

Thanks,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on December 14, 2012, 03:26:20 PM
That's a lot of work Logan, it's very nice to see how it evolves. For someone doing such a tremendous job, we say in Dutch "Petje af" or in plain English 'Caps off'. Good work  :)

friendly regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on December 16, 2012, 12:30:48 PM
'Cap off' indeed. Go Logan!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Tophe on December 16, 2012, 05:03:23 PM
Logan,
Last night I dowloaded a "Logan A-39" mix of P-51 and A-26... I don't find it anymore. Did I dream? It was beautiful, thanks anyway... :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 16, 2012, 09:26:16 PM
You got it off a post on the What If Forums (http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,36205.msg581393.html#msg581393).  I plan to repost all my old stuff on here someday when I hit the doldrums and don't feel like profiling for a little while.  Anyway, I'll repost it below so you can find it next time you look for it.   ;)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/My%20Pictures/a-39.jpg)

This is an old design that I drew years ago.  It's on lined paper because I drew them in a boring meeting or lecture to keep me from going to sleep.  I called it the North American A-39...something.  I had a nickname for it at one time, but I don't remember what it was.  Stallion, I think?  It's basically a mental kitbash of two of my favorite late-war American aircraft, the P-51 and the A-26.  It trades speed for payload.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Tophe on December 16, 2012, 11:39:01 PM
Thanks a lot: as beautiful than in my nightime dreams... :-*
Thanks again, and congratulations!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Empty Handed on December 17, 2012, 06:58:21 AM
I really like that A-39!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on December 17, 2012, 08:27:27 AM
Me too! And, for a second there, I thought the lined paper rules were panel lines  ;D
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 17, 2012, 12:22:52 PM
Thanks, guys!  It's an oldie but a goodie.  The P-51 generally makes Whifs look pretty good if you use it as a starting point.  You're welcome to take the idea and run with it if you want.  I have too much on my plate to do a high-quality version.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Tophe on December 17, 2012, 12:44:34 PM
I used it as starting point, thanks, while... on the opposite direction as the panel-lines direction that you call high-quality, I prefer imagining many simplified silhouettes.
Thanks again for this enrichment to my P-51 collection!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Litvyak on December 17, 2012, 01:21:52 PM
The LH-51D really jumps out at me!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on December 18, 2012, 02:48:26 AM
Me too. Although the LH-51D-2 might be easier to model?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Tophe on December 18, 2012, 07:15:45 AM
I think modelling Logan's A-39 is possible with black canopies and a P-51B basis. It would be a hard job with clear canopies... But anyway, thanks Logan to make us dream. :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 18, 2012, 08:11:39 AM
I'm glad you guys liked it.  My goal was to change the basic look by giving it that thicker center section, yet keep some of the P-51's good looks.  You could even do a twin fuselage bomber variant somewhat like a Kestrel from Crimson Skies, too.

(http://surbrook.devermore.net/adaptationsvehicles/fictionair/crimsonskies/mcdonnell-s2B-kestrel.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on December 18, 2012, 11:21:27 AM
Awwww man, I love the Crimson Skies aircraft and all the inspiration they create! I wish they had made models from the game.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 19, 2012, 02:52:35 PM
Quick update, though nothing to look at right now.  Most of the rudder detail is done, the only real things I have left are the details of the cutouts.  Then I need to relight and shade the tail with an emphasis on the rudder.  Finally, I'll have to redo the NMF on everything that isn't the fuselage.  Rudder detail should be a one night job, redone tail lighting probably another three nights, then the NMF will take a couple of nights, likely.  In short, I'll probably need at least a week to finish this up, maybe longer.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 20, 2012, 02:51:48 PM
Alright, well I got more done tonight than I expected to.  It went easier than I had feared.

That's easy! (http://youtu.be/OynKbfEGV_A)

The only major two things left are to redo the lighting and shading on the tail, then do the NMF panels on the entire boom.  The first one of those things is probably the more difficult task, but the second will probably take longer.  Oh, and the I need to add the rivet dimples, but that should be one of the last things I need to do.  Anyway, I hope you like where it is.  I thought you may want to see another preview.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/In%20Progress/Preview/P-61-profile-WIP-10-tail.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Glanini on December 21, 2012, 07:21:13 AM
This work is just great, I did it just once, on a MB326, and it Was exhausting.

 :) :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 21, 2012, 09:21:09 AM
Ain't that the truth!  It's somewhat soul-sucking until you finish it!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: elmayerle on December 21, 2012, 09:44:36 AM
*grin* Doing every single fastener in CAD can be rather soul-sucking, too (speaking from experience here - 455 screws hung in their proper spatial locations in 7-1/2 hours.  The only things that made it feasible is that I already had the hang-points set up and 'twas the same screw used all over.

on the other hand, it's finished and ready to go for the test hardware.  If this and another project pan out as predicted, we're going to make some aftermarket vendor happy doing appropriate correction pieces for the V-22 engine nacelles.  And it looks like I'll be in the middle of at least one, if not both.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 21, 2012, 10:52:54 AM
True, but AutoCAD's a better program to work with on details and such.  Plus, you're getting paid for your screws and rivets.   ;)  I cone home and do this for fun...  >:( :icon_sueno:

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on December 21, 2012, 11:05:12 AM
I wish I had your patience, the extra mile you travel sure shows in your work. (http://www.doomisland2.com/images/avatars/3771.gif)
Heck I wish I could get some time when I'm not exhausted from work to play with pixels and or plastic. I keep telling myself soon but so far I've been making a pretty good liar of myself. (http://www.doomisland2.com/images/avatars/10871.gif)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: elmayerle on December 21, 2012, 11:21:40 AM
True, but AutoCAD's a better program to work with on details and such.  Plus, you're getting paid for your screws and rivets.   ;)  I cone home and do this for fun...  >:( :icon_sueno:
There is that.  I wouldn't know too much about AutoCAD as the one job where I used it, we were restricted by contract to using it in strictly 2D "drawing board" mode.  Still, that aspect of this job went well and I surprised my management by just how quickly and accurately I could complete it (they were expecting it to take longer based on the time required to finish the first part; they didn't realize that this also took into consideration the set-up work that made everything else go faster).

I really need to get a CAD system working here at home for modelling purposes, though that may require a new desktop.  Same for using PS or whatever to do color art.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 21, 2012, 11:54:31 AM
Alright, and here's the updated lighting/shading tonight.  The tail went on a serious diet and is now much thinner (in appearance).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/In%20Progress/Preview/P-61-profile-WIP-11-tail.jpg)

And a shot of the real thing for comparison:

(http://1000aircraftphotos.com/Contributions/FisherJack/10268L.jpg)

Next, I need to do the NMF panels next, followed by the rivets.  Neither of those are particularly difficult.  If you're all very good, you may get it by Christmas.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on December 21, 2012, 01:33:16 PM
We're all sitting quietly with our hands in our laps and not whining for shortbread. Is it Christmas yet?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Diamondback on December 21, 2012, 04:35:15 PM
Impressive work, Logan... one gets the impression that building a profile your way might be harder work than building an actual full-size aircraft in some ways, and such dedication is always something to be recognized.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 26, 2012, 02:25:48 PM
Well, I'm rounding the last pylon.  In what will be one of my last previews, I'll give you a little peek behind the curtain as to how I do the natural metal finish layers.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/In%20Progress/Preview/P-61-profile-WIP-12-NMF1red.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Diamondback on December 26, 2012, 05:37:31 PM
Assign a visibly-different "placeholder" color to each group of same-shade panels, then replace 'em all as a batch?

PM already dispatched to Evan, but for my own drafting use I usually use Google SketchUp for quick-and-dirty visualizations and Dassault DraftSight for precise work. AVOID SmartDraw--they try to tell you it's free, then spring the trialware trap on you and the price is over $100. I miss my old Windows 95/98 IntelliCAD install...
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 27, 2012, 02:05:15 AM
Assign a visibly-different "placeholder" color to each group of same-shade panels, then replace 'em all as a batch

Yes, so that I don't need 50 layers for the NMF panels, just 4.  If you use a different texture pattern and slightly different color for each, then the eye will pick up what are different panels.  The trick is that the panels can't touch or you'll see the pattern going from one to the other.

Still a bit to go, but it's getting closer all the time.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Tophe on December 27, 2012, 03:22:05 AM
Yes, so that I don't need 50 layers for the NMF panels, just 4.

Is that the famous law "no matter the shapes, 4 colours are enough to colourize 2D shapes"? I worked on it at http://www.kristofmeunier.fr/4couleurs.htm (http://www.kristofmeunier.fr/4couleurs.htm)
(in French, sorry)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 27, 2012, 03:51:30 AM
Hmm, never heard that before.  That's interesting, Tophe.  I guess it is a case of that, although this isn't designed to show depth as much as it is texture.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 30, 2012, 09:47:30 AM
Alright, here's another preview...

I hadn't planned on redoing the wing shading, but as I went to redo the metal on them, I realized that I really had to correct it.  I just didn't look at photos enough when I did it the first time.  Anyway, I hope you like it!

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/In%20Progress/Preview/P-61-profile-WIP-12-wing.jpg)

Last thing I can think of is the rivets dimpling, then I should be about done...

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on December 30, 2012, 12:08:36 PM
As expected, it's looking spectacular Logan  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Litvyak on December 30, 2012, 01:12:24 PM
Um.... *at a loss for words*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 31, 2012, 10:14:43 AM
Alright, I think I'm ready to call it done!  Only about 3 years in the making!  Here's my third finished entry for the Clear Your Bench GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?board=39.0).  As per usual, click on it to view it at 100%.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/1080px/USAAFWidow1.jpg) (http://fc09.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2012/365/1/1/northrop_xp_61f_escort_fighter_prototype_by_comradeloganov-d5pugpv.png)

Ordered in parallel with the P-82 Twin Mustang, the P-61F long range escort fighter was intended as a lower risk option should the radical Twin Mustang encounter development issues.  This would prove to be a wise decision when the war ended and Rolls Royce began requiring a royalty to be paid for each Packard V-1650 Merlin produced.  The uprated Allison V-1710 that was offered as an alternative powerplant for the P-82 Twin Mustang had so many reliability issues that it was referred to as the “Allison Time Bomb”!  In contrast, the turbo supercharged Pratt & Whitney R-2800s that powered the P-61F were reliable and affordable.  A P-61C (43-8338) was pulled from the Hawthorne production line and completed as the XP-61F prototype.  The XP-61F was accepted by the Army Air Force and first flew in September of 1945.  Having no need for additional P-61Cs, the USAAF converted the last 450 aircraft of the original order for 500 P-61Cs into day escort fighters.  This order for 450 production fighters would continue to be revised into a final order for 150 escort fighters, 200 night fighters, and 100 photo-reconnaissance aircraft (designated F-15A Reporters).

I hope you all like it!  Click here to view the full build thread.  Northrop XP-61F Escort Fighter Prototype - Build Thread (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=2454.0)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 31, 2012, 10:25:04 AM
One last comparison:

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/In%20Progress/XP-61F-WIP-2-22-10.jpg)

First preview: February 22, 2010



(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/In%20Progress/P-61-profile-WIP-13_25.jpg)

Finished profile: December 30, 2012


Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: dy031101 on December 31, 2012, 11:23:47 AM
Awesome just as expected!  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Glanini on December 31, 2012, 03:54:35 PM
Wonderful ...... :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on December 31, 2012, 04:20:11 PM
Wow Logan! Great Job! :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: finsrin on December 31, 2012, 04:28:34 PM
WOW - Over the top beautious.   :-* :-* :-*
Great concept which warrants a styrene likeness being built.

For pacific theater part of Luft 46  ???
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Scooterman on January 01, 2013, 09:35:13 AM
WOWZERS!!!

If you're planning on some schemes for that beauitful bird, can I suggest Russian VVS?  Would be perfect for Siberian patrols.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Frank3k on January 01, 2013, 10:33:51 AM
That is a spectacular profile! Makes me want to build it.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on January 01, 2013, 12:50:50 PM
Gorgeous! Hellova difference over those three years too  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 01, 2013, 03:20:06 PM
That is a spectacular profile! Makes me want to build it.

Great concept which warrants a styrene likeness being built.

For pacific theater part of Luft 46  ???

Thanks, finsrin!  You could actually build this one.  With an F-15A Reporter or XP-61E conversion kit, you could do a pretty straightforward one.

I think I'll be able to do at least one for Luft '46.

If you're planning on some schemes for that beauitful bird, can I suggest Russian VVS?  Would be perfect for Siberian patrols.

Hmm, maybe a Soviet one later, but a service aircraft might be a bit tougher to manage...


Thanks everyone for the very kind words!  I hope you will like some of those that I'll be doing later, too!  The next profile shouldn't take quite as long to do.  ;)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: The Big Gimper on January 01, 2013, 08:47:39 PM
Quote
Great concept which warrants a styrene likeness being built.

For pacific theater part of Luft 46  ???


Thanks, finsrin!  You could actually build this one.  With an F-15A Reporter or XP-61E conversion kit, you could do a pretty straightforward one.

I think I'll be able to do at least one for Luft '46.


Mike West over at Lone Star Models (http://www.lonestarmodels.com/Conversions1-72.html) has created a P-61E conversion kit in 1/72 and 1/48.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Empty Handed on January 02, 2013, 12:50:49 AM
That is simply stunning!!!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: elmayerle on January 02, 2013, 11:48:17 AM
Damn!!  What can I say, Logan?  That's truly gorgeous and enticing.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 03, 2013, 12:56:13 AM
Thanks, guys!  Service variants next!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on January 03, 2013, 01:07:39 AM
Looking forward to seeing these!  Top notch work logan. :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Gingie on January 03, 2013, 09:07:01 AM
fantastic work! Love the subtle metalwork!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: elmayerle on January 03, 2013, 12:37:43 PM
So, to model this we'd keep the 20mm cannon in the belly and install .50 cal. machine guns in the nose?  I presume a quartet of them?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 03, 2013, 01:19:27 PM
Actually, this one has both.  4x .50s and 4x 20mm.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Talos on January 03, 2013, 06:36:22 PM
So, to model this we'd keep the 20mm cannon in the belly and install .50 cal. machine guns in the nose?  I resume a quartet of them?

Yes, you'd need to keep the belly guns too. The first prototype P-61E had it arranged in a square, the second and future production has it like we have here, with the center two higher, like this: _--_

I'm working on the nose markings for the first service one we're doing. I think it's going to rock you all.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 17, 2013, 06:23:37 AM
In case anyone was wondering Adobe Photoshop CS5 doesn't handle right-to-left languages very well. Fun times.   ::)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on January 17, 2013, 03:13:02 PM
In case anyone was wondering Adobe Photoshop CS5 doesn't handle right-to-left languages very well. Fun times.   ::)

Cheers,

Logan

Excuses, excuses!  Just hurry up and finish! ;)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Doom! on January 17, 2013, 11:54:01 PM
Are you making a profile for the dislexian air force?  :P
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 17, 2013, 11:56:57 PM
Ton mi on.

Nagol
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 18, 2013, 03:38:17 PM
Well, I just finished my first entry for the Desert GB, but I still need to write up the full backstory, get it exported in the various sizes, upload it, etc.

If I can find a free couple of hours tomorrow, you guys should get to see it then.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 19, 2013, 03:34:53 PM
Here's my first finished entry for the Desert Warfare GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?board=40.0), a Martin B-51B Panther operated by 110 Squadron, "Knights of the North" of the Israeli Defence Forces, Air Force.  Click on the image to see it at 100%.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/B-51%20Panther/900px/IsraeliPanther1.jpg?t=1358572074) (http://fc01.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2013/018/a/9/israeli_martin_b_51b_panther_by_comradeloganov-d5ryafd.jpg)

By the mid-1960s, the Israeli Defence Force/Air Force (IDF/AF) fleet of attack aircraft was in dire need of replacement.  Ideally, Israel wanted to replace its light attack aircraft with a single type and the heavy attack aircraft (Vautour and Super Mystère) with another.  While the IDF/AF eventually settled on the A-4 for its light attack requirement, the US proposed the Martin B-51 Panther for the heavy attack role.

Ironically, this was not the first time the IDF/AF looked at acquiring the B-51.  Ten years earlier, Israel signed a deal to purchase 24 Canadair-manufactured Sabres and an equal number of Canadair-manufactured Panthers.  The deal fell through as a result of the 1956 Suez Crisis, international pressure seeing the Canadians cancel both deals and accepting the aircraft into their own RCAF.  As a result, the IDF/AF was forced to acquire the Super Mystère and Vautour instead.  This both worked for and against the B-51B in the American proposal, many IDF officers relishing the idea of finally getting the aircraft they'd always wanted.  However, they were also keenly aware of the fact that this was 10 years later and they would be receiving second-hand aircraft that had already seen their best days.  The American proposal was quite reasonable, though, the cost per airframe for the large, refurbished B-51Bs being less than that of the new A-4s the IDF/AF also had its sights on.

The aircraft were reconditioned and delivered just too late for the 1967 Six Day War, some IDF pilots being in conversion courses when the war started.  Following the war deliveries promptly began, the first aircraft arriving at the end of the year.  Unlike the Skyhawks—which were sealed and shipped overseas—the Panthers were flown to Israel, refueling both in midair and at stops along the way.  The first unit to receive the aircraft was the 110 Squadron, "The Knights of the North", trading in their Vautours and transitioning rather smoothly.  The aircraft proved popular with the Israeli pilots, but many in Israel felt that the aircraft was a white elephant.  Indeed, compared especially to its stablemate, the A-4, the B-51 consumed jet fuel, spare parts, runway, and ramp space at a staggering rate with little apparent advantage in range or payload over the A-4 to show for it.  It wouldn't be long before the B-51 Panther would be called upon to justify the extra care it required.

The B-51 Panther would first see service with the IDF/AF during the War of Attrition.  During this period, the aircraft saw significant action with 110 Squadron, numerous aircraft being hit by anti-aircraft fire, but none were lost.  The vulnerability of the A-4 to both anti-aircraft fire and surface-to-air missiles was made apparent.  The B-51, by comparison, had armor protecting the engines and crew, had the redundancy provided by three engines, and had the tail surfaces placed well away from the engine exhaust.  Despite its size, the B-51 was considered to be easy to maintain, arm, and refuel.  Perhaps most importantly the B-51 Panther was very fast in a bomb run.  The enclosed, rotating bomb bay allowed the B-51 to take up to 8,500 lbs of bombs over a target at 550 kts drop it accurately at high speed, and get back safely.

The Panther saw its greatest combat with the Israeli Air Force during the Yom Kippur War.  In the extensive combat that the aircraft saw, a number of aircraft were lost to SA-2 SAMs, but the B-51's ability to absorb punishment from both AAA and SA-7 shoulder-launched SAMs was considered a great asset in the close air support (CAS) role.  Due to the mounting losses of all types during the Yom Kippur War, however, the United States authorized the immediate transfer of a number of F-4s, A-4s, and B-51s as emergency aid.  These replacement aircraft plus some additional purchases following the war allowed Israel to replace the Super Mystères of 105 Squadron completely after the Yom Kippur War.  These two units would continue to fly B-51s throughout the 1970s.

Click here to view the full build thread.  Israeli B-51B Panther Build Thread - Yom Kippur War (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=2566.0)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: finsrin on January 19, 2013, 04:32:27 PM
B-51s are cool  8)
Great profile and story.  :)
Found 1/72 B-51 vacuform at swap meet.  Will try cheap-simple vacuform(s) before B-51 build.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: JP Vieira on January 19, 2013, 07:21:54 PM
Very, very good
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Empty Handed on January 19, 2013, 07:27:04 PM
Great job! Israeli colours really suit the Panther.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Daryl J. on January 20, 2013, 07:27:45 AM
That just simply works.    Yessireebob it does. 
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on January 22, 2013, 01:25:54 PM
Israeli colours really suit the Panther.

They really do! Nice work Logan  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on January 22, 2013, 01:43:58 PM
Very good job, the israeli B-51!!!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on January 31, 2013, 11:51:26 AM
Israeli colours really suit the Panther.

They really do! Nice work Logan  :)

I was really pleased with how it turned out.  It was one that I wanted to do and I'm glad I got around to it sooner than later.

Thanks for the compliments everyone!  I'm planning on getting another profile done for the Desert Warfare GB, so watch this space!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 01, 2013, 08:03:13 AM
In case anyone didn't see it, here's your chance to help me decide what my next project will be.  I've posted a poll on the Desert Warfare GB thread. (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=2605.0)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: M.A.D on February 03, 2013, 08:50:12 AM
Welcome back :)

Quote
Help me decide what to work on next!


You ask and you shall receive ;)

Just yesterday I posted a little 'what if' story on 'Right the Wrong' http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=2598.45 (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=2598.45)

In it I wrote that the Soviet's had put into operational service the Mikoyan-Gurevich Ye-152P Flipper supersonic interceptor.
It got me thinking ................ a series of 'what if' profiles of the Mikoyan-Gurevich Ye-152M Flipper's in the markings and colours of the likes of Libya, Algeria, India, Egypt, North Vietnam Syria, maybe PLAAF and North Korean service, as the Soviet's are reluctant to export its state-of-the-art and very expensive to operate Ye-155 aka MiG-25 Foxbat ! These profiles would look mighty impressive with their big and powerful Raduga K-9 (AA-4 Awl) and Molniya R-4 (AA-5 Ash) air-to-air missiles!
Hey and if you're reel keen, you might want to have a crack at a specialised reconnaissance variant!!

P.S. I love the Israeli Martin B-51B Panther!!

M.A.D   
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: elmayerle on February 03, 2013, 12:06:07 PM
Just yesterday I posted a little 'what if' story on 'Right the Wrong' [url]http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=2598.45[/url] ([url]http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=2598.45[/url])

In it I wrote that the Soviet's had put into operational service the Mikoyan-Gurevich Ye-152P Flipper supersonic interceptor.
It got me thinking ................ a series of 'what if' profiles of the Mikoyan-Gurevich Ye-152M Flipper's in the markings and colours of the likes of Libya, Algeria, India, Egypt, North Vietnam Syria, maybe PLAAF and North Korean service, as the Soviet's are reluctant to export its state-of-the-art and very expensive to operate Ye-155 aka MiG-25 Foxbat ! These profiles would look mighty impressive with their big and powerful Raduga K-9 (AA-4 Awl) and Molniya R-4 (AA-5 Ash) air-to-air missiles!
Hey and if you're reel keen, you might want to have a crack at a specialised reconnaissance variant!!

Will that be with an internal equipment fit or with external pods as done on the reconnaissance variants of the MiG-21?  I rather like the idea of using alternate pods, depending on the type of data required.  Of course, there'd be ECM/ESM pods on the wingtips.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 03, 2013, 12:41:04 PM
Talos and I actually have a MiG-21 variant planned somewhere down the road, but I meant a profile of an existing aircraft I've done.  Doing a new one can take quite a while.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: M.A.D on February 03, 2013, 05:27:13 PM
Just yesterday I posted a little 'what if' story on 'Right the Wrong' [url]http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=2598.45[/url] ([url]http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=2598.45[/url])

In it I wrote that the Soviet's had put into operational service the Mikoyan-Gurevich Ye-152P Flipper supersonic interceptor.
It got me thinking ................ a series of 'what if' profiles of the Mikoyan-Gurevich Ye-152M Flipper's in the markings and colours of the likes of Libya, Algeria, India, Egypt, North Vietnam Syria, maybe PLAAF and North Korean service, as the Soviet's are reluctant to export its state-of-the-art and very expensive to operate Ye-155 aka MiG-25 Foxbat ! These profiles would look mighty impressive with their big and powerful Raduga K-9 (AA-4 Awl) and Molniya R-4 (AA-5 Ash) air-to-air missiles!
Hey and if you're reel keen, you might want to have a crack at a specialised reconnaissance variant!!

Will that be with an internal equipment fit or with external pods as done on the reconnaissance variants of the MiG-21?  I rather like the idea of using alternate pods, depending on the type of data required.  Of course, there'd be ECM/ESM pods on the wingtips.


I like it!!
I will leave that decision of internal or external in Logan's capable hands, if he so choses to do it!
But I guess, as in the case of the MiG-21R, the need for fuel could dictate this!
But if I could push the friendship, both might be interesting!

M.A.D
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Tophe on February 03, 2013, 09:34:29 PM
I would vote for an old Palestinian F-15A REporter, without any gun... ;)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 07, 2013, 01:45:49 AM
Well, I decided on one to do!  Click on it to view it at 100%.  Thanks to philp for the suggestion!

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Mi-24%20Hind/900px/IsraeliHind1.jpg) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Mi-24%20Hind/IsraeliHind1.jpg)

In December 2005, Elbit was awarded a contract to upgrade Bulgaria’s Mi-24V attack helicopters to comply with NATO standards.  After work had been started on all 12 Hind helicopters, Russia informed the Bulgarian Ministry of Defense that Elbit’s work was uncertified and that all of the aircraft would be hereby unsupported by the manufacturer.  After cancellation of the upgrade contract, Bulgaria demanded damages equivalent to the full value of the aircraft, arguing that they were unusable now and therefore only able to be scrapped.  Israel, negotiating on Elbit’s behalf, agreed to take over the contract from Bulgaria in addition to paying Bulgaria a reasonable sum for the Mi-24 helicopters.

Having just stood down the 161 “Cobras of the North” attack helicopter squadron and transferring its AH-1 Cobras to 160 Squadron, Israel decided to reform the unit in order to operate its “new” Mi-24 Hinds.  Israel was confident of its ability to operate the Mi-24 without official support from Russia.  Since Israel didn’t use Russian munitions, however, Elbit worked with Lockheed Martin to rearm the Mi-24s with the 20mm M197 and Hellfire missiles, in addition to their own Spike missiles.  The upgraded Hinds proved to be popular with the IDF, which nicknamed the Mi-24 the “Tniniim” (Crocodile).  The 161 Squadron was renamed “The Crocodile Squadron” to better fit its new mount, complete with a new logo to match the new name, but based on the logo of old.  The open-mouthed black snake on a green background with its tail wrapped around a yellow lightning bolt was replaced by a crocodile in the same pose.

The Mi-24 was reliable, and Israel found little difficulty maintaining the new aircraft, especially after support for them was unofficially reinstated following Russian negotiations to acquire Israeli UAVs.  Spare parts (including new engines) were merely sent through either Belorussian or Indian intermediaries to the satisfaction of both parties.  The aircraft were painted in a scheme matching the AH-64D Saraf, but were also given a tan crocodile silhouette, much like the cobra silhouette on the AH-1s in service with the IDF.  The yellow “V” recognition symbol was especially important for the new Mi-24s since its potential adversary Syria also operated the ever-popular Hind.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on February 07, 2013, 02:11:06 AM
 :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: von hitchofen2 on February 07, 2013, 08:44:54 AM
excellent!  8)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: dy031101 on February 07, 2013, 11:05:10 AM
Isn't Crocodile the original Russian nickname for the Mi-24, too?

I mean, there are some NATO reporting names that I'm not exactly a big fan of.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 07, 2013, 12:07:24 PM
It is.  That's why I picked it.  The Israelis usually go for animal nicknames.  They have numerous lizards for helicopters, so it seemed to fit.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on February 07, 2013, 03:18:54 PM
Just very good! 8)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 12, 2013, 10:40:31 AM
Here's my second finished entry for the Desert Warfare GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?board=40.0), Hans-Joachim Marseille's Heinkel He 100D-4/Z Trop, WNr 10137 'Yellow 14' as it appeared in June of 1942.  Notice the radiator fairing under the aircraft that Talos made for this profile.  Click on the image to view it at 100%.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/GermanHe100D5.jpg) (http://fc08.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2013/042/8/9/marseille_s_heinkel_he_100d_4_z_trop__afrika__by_comradeloganov-d5umkyw.jpg)

Hans-Joachim Marseille was a Luftwaffe fighter pilot and flying ace during World War II. He is noted for his aerial battles during the North African Campaign and his Bohemian lifestyle. One of the most successful fighter pilots, he was nicknamed the "Star of Africa". Marseille claimed all but seven of his "official" 158 victories against the British Commonwealth's Desert Air Force over North Africa, flying the Heinkel He 100 fighter for his entire combat career in North Africa. No other pilot claimed as many Western Allied aircraft as Marseille.

The D-4/Z Trop variant featured more changes tailored to combat in the desert than the earlier D-2 Trop. In addition to the tropical intake filters found on the D-2, it had fittings for a cockpit umbrella on the side of the fuselage and a fairing that went around the radiator. The retractable radiator, although unnecessarily complex, functioned just fine in Northern Europe, but would oftentimes overheat if not fixed down at all times in North Africa. Additionally, the sand and grit in the desert interfered with the sliding retraction mechanism. The /Z variant indicated that the aircraft was fitted with a DB 601 that used nitrous oxide. GM-1 (Göring Mischung 1), colloquially known as Haha-Gerät (Ha-Ha Device) was a system for injecting nitrous oxide (laughing gas) into aircraft engines that was used by the Luftwaffe in World War II. This increased the amount of oxygen in the fuel mixture, and thereby improved high-altitude performance.

Click here to view the full build thread.  Hans-Joachim Marseille's He 100D-4/Z Trop Build Thread - JG 27 'Afrika' (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=2666.0)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Empty Handed on February 12, 2013, 10:53:04 AM
Quote
Click on the image to view it at 100%.

Clicks......

*Sensory overload*

Some time later....

Woah!

Seriously though, I have no superlatives!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: elmayerle on February 12, 2013, 11:03:16 AM
Seriously gorgeous work, Logan, and a definite tip o' the hat to Talos for the change to the radiator.  I can well believe they found it necessary to fix it down and provide some dust protection.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on February 12, 2013, 04:12:46 PM
Good work Logan!!  8)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Flitzer on February 12, 2013, 07:14:18 PM
Beautiful.
P  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: jorel62 on February 13, 2013, 05:12:24 AM
Very cool......
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 13, 2013, 03:20:09 PM
Thanks for the kind words, everyone!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 13, 2013, 03:20:44 PM
Here's the last entry I have planned for the Desert Warfare GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?board=40.0).  It depicts Squadron Leader Bobby Gibbes' Heinkel He 100D-4 Trop HK849 as it appeared in November of 1942.  Note the additional windscreen armor for the pilot.  Talos has had that done for a long while but this is the first profile where I've been able to use it.  Click on the image to view it at 100%.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/AustralianHe100D1.jpg) (http://fc02.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2013/043/e/5/gibbes__australian_heinkel_he_100d_4_trop_raaf_by_comradeloganov-d5urpdk.png)

In October 1942, this Heinkel He 100D-4 Trop (Werknummer unknown) was found on Martuba airfield (LG 4). It was restored to flying condition by mechanics of 3 Squadron RAAF and given the serial number HK849. The plane received standard RAF camouflage used for planes in Africa: Dark Earth and Middle Stone on upper surfaces and sides, lower surfaces were painted with Azure Blue.

This He 100 was flown on 2 November 1942 by Squadron Leader Bobby Gibbes. Robert Henry Maxwell (Bobby) Gibbes DSO, DFC & Bar, OAM was a leading Australian fighter ace of World War II. He was officially credited with shooting down 10¼ enemy aircraft, although his score is often reported as 12 destroyed. Born in rural New South Wales, Gibbes worked as a jackaroo and salesman before joining the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) in February 1940. Posted to the Middle East in May 1941, he became commanding officer of No. 3 Squadron RAAF during the North African campaign, where his leadership and fighting skills earned him the Distinguished Service Order and the Distinguished Flying Cross and Bar. Besides Gibbes, 'Dora' was also flown by Flight Lieutenant Ron Watt. On 8 December 1942, HK849 was handed over to Gazala where it was piloted mainly by Pilot Officer Reg Pfeiffer.

Click here to view the full build thread.  Bobby Gibbes' Australian Heinkel He 100D-4 Trop Build Thread - RAAF (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=2669.0)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: finsrin on February 13, 2013, 04:51:30 PM
Remember when I discovered there was/is a He 100.  Liked its lines right off.  Refreshing after so many Me-109 & FW-190.

Great profiles  :)
They add a lot of character !
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Empty Handed on February 13, 2013, 09:08:09 PM
Now THAT is a looker!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: elmayerle on February 14, 2013, 02:27:13 AM
I love that Australian He100D-4 Trop.  Would they have retained the German cannon or replaced them with British cannon for which ammunition would be easier to obtain?

Gorgeous work!!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 14, 2013, 02:57:58 AM
Well, it's just a captured aircraft used for evaluation.  They may have removed the guns altogether in time, it really depended.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: jorel62 on February 14, 2013, 04:56:16 AM
 :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 31, 2013, 11:48:30 AM
Here's my latest profile from the collaboration with Talos.  I've also submitted this to the Asiarama GB (http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,36910.0.html) over at the What If Forums.  Click on the image below to view the profile at 100%.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/JapaneseHe100D1.jpg) (http://fc05.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2013/089/4/f/japanese_heinkel_he_100d_1_heinkeru_axhe1_by_comradeloganov-d5zva66.png)

Text from Erwin Hood's fantastic book "Heinkel He 100: Record Breaker".

It seems likely that the October 1939 Japanese delegation had been visiting Marienehe in preparation for the purchase of which had begun 11 months earlier. Three He 100 A-0s, presumably built as Section II airframes, were delivered to Japan in the summer of 1940, but there is evidence to indicate that drawings of an earlier version had been handed over to the December 1938 delegation. The does seem to have been an intention to produce a licence-built version of the He 100 in Japan for the Imperial Japanese Navy. The aircraft was given the official IJN designation of AXHe1 (Carrier-based fighter, Experimental, Heinkel, Type 1). A subsidiary of the Hitachi petrochemical concern, known as Hitachi Kokuki K K, was established in May 1939 expressly to produce not only a version of the He 100 but possibly also a licence-built version of the He 100. A factory was built in Chiba on the eastern side of Tokyo Bay. At least one of the He 100s was sent to the Naval Air Technical Centre in Yokosuka where, between 15 August and 10 September 1942, it was subjected to propeller vibration tests. Also noteworthy is the fact that it is described as a Heinkeru 100 Model Fighter, not as an AXHe1.

A note on the profile itself. This is a “what if” profile, but only in the sense that we don’t know what the He 100s delivered to Japan really looked like once they arrived in Japan. To my knowledge, there are no known photographs of the aircraft of descriptions of their markings. Judging from the He 100s sold to the Soviet Union, I find it likely that they would have been painted in overall gray by Heinkel before delivery. We do have at least one photo of an He 112 that was purchased by the IJN, and the scheme I’ve put the He 100 in is based on that.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: jorel62 on March 31, 2013, 06:54:45 PM
Now that is nice...... :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: von hitchofen2 on March 31, 2013, 08:12:16 PM
fantastic!  8)...not so much a "what if", as "what did it actually look like?"

a fine addition to your He 100 profiles

looking forward to the Finnish and Romanian ones [hint, hint]
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on April 01, 2013, 03:20:19 AM
Actually looking at that one makes me wonder what a float plane version would look like...maybe even as a Schneider Trophy style racer...
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: finsrin on April 01, 2013, 03:32:43 AM
Has a genuine designed-built in Japan look.   :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: ysi_maniac on April 01, 2013, 11:50:36 AM
Beautiful!! :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: dy031101 on April 01, 2013, 12:15:43 PM
Actually looking at that one makes me wonder what a float plane version would look like...maybe even as a Schneider Trophy style racer...

Or something posing even more surprises to USN dive/torpedo bomber crew......
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 02, 2013, 12:50:19 PM
Thanks for the compliments, everyone!  I'm glad you all liked it!


fantastic!  8)...not so much a "what if", as "what did it actually look like?"

a fine addition to your He 100 profiles

looking forward to the Finnish and Romanian ones [hint, hint]

Thanks!  That is it indeed.  I wish we knew whether they painted any additional markings on them or not.  As for the Finns and Romanian ones, they're a comin', they're a comin'!  Talos and I were just commenting the other night how we need to clone ourselves just to get the projects we want done.


Has a genuine designed-built in Japan look.   :)
Thanks, finsrin!  That's just what some people were saying on DeviantArt and the What If forums, too. :)  I don't think it's entirely coincidental.


Actually looking at that one makes me wonder what a float plane version would look like...maybe even as a Schneider Trophy style racer...

Or something posing even more surprises to USN dive/torpedo bomber crew......

 :icon_ninja:

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Vuk on April 02, 2013, 02:09:38 PM
Q: could we see He100 in Royal Yugoslav Air Force markings?

Quote from Wikipedia: In April (1938), it looked like Yugoslavia would be the next user of the He 112. It placed an order for 30 aircraft, but later cancelled the order and decided to produce other designs under license.

Your work is, in a lack of proper term, excellent.  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 03, 2013, 01:43:15 PM
Thanks very much, Vuk!  I was planning on doing an He 100 in Yugoslavian markings, but not until 1945 in JRV service.  I had planned on keeping the Bf 109 orders intact for Yugoslavia and Switzerland as I didn't think the RLM was likely to grant export licenses to those two countries in 1939 for its latest fighter.  I could see Japan and likely even Romania, but I just didn't think the other two were as likely.  Maybe I could do one purchased before the invasion for evaluation.

On to the current profile, though.  I've also submitted this to the Asiarama GB (http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,36910.0.html) over at the What If Forums.  Click on the image below to view the profile at 100%.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/JapaneseHe100D2.jpg:original) (http://fc08.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2013/092/7/1/japanese_hitachi_a9he1_herman__heinkel_he_100__by_comradeloganov-d609ezj.png)

In mid-1940, Imperial Japanese Navy testing of the Heinkel He 100 (designated AXHe1 by the IJN) proved very successful and Hitachi was contracted to begin license production of the aircraft as soon as possible. A subsidiary of the Hitachi petrochemical concern, known as Hitachi Kokuki K K, was established in May 1939 expressly to produce the fighter at a new factory constructed in Chiba on the eastern side of Tokyo Bay. Intended for the land-based interceptor role, the ‘A-’ designation was carried over from the AXHe experimental He 100 purchased from Heinkel. Following on the designations for the A7He (Heinkel He 112) and A8V (Seversky 2PA-B3), the license manufactured He 100s were designated A9He. Unlike the US Navy, whose company designations reflected the manufacturer, in the Japanese Navy, the company designations reflected the designer, in this case Heinkel.

To power the new aircraft, Aichi license built the DB 601 as the Atsuta for the Navy, while Kawasaki built DB 601s for the Army as the Ha-40. In an effort to get more of the aircraft produced even sooner and as insurance against possible delays from the relatively inexperienced Hitachi, Nakajima was also contracted to begin production of the He 100 in late 1940. This led to the somewhat amusing scenario of Aichi producing Atsuta engines and delivering them to Nakajima to power A9He interceptors, while Nakajima was producing Sakae radial engines and delivering them to Mitsubishi to power the famous A6M “Zero” fighter, while Mitsubishi was producing Kinsei engines and delivering them to Aichi to power their D3A dive bombers!

The most major change to the He 100’s design was the replacement of the troublesome retractable radiator with a fixed radiator aft of the wing and cockpit. This led to a reduction in top speed, but improved cooling drastically, something that would prove essential for use in the Pacific theater. In anticipation of the aircraft's service with the IJNAF, the Allies assigned the He 100 the nickname "Herman", reflecting its German heritage. The profile above depicts the prototype A9He1 produced by Hitachi. As the Aichi Atsuta engines were not yet ready, it was powered by a DB 601.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on April 03, 2013, 02:24:37 PM
Nice.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on April 03, 2013, 02:25:59 PM
Of course having mentioned Switzerland, the idea of a Swiss He-100 is appealing...as would be a Swedish one ;)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: jorel62 on April 03, 2013, 08:26:34 PM
Oh man that is nice.........
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on April 08, 2013, 12:17:21 PM
Love the operational Hitachi 'Herman' with its Hein radiator bath  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Talos on April 08, 2013, 11:05:52 PM
Love the operational Hitachi 'Herman' with its Hien radiator bath  :-*

When I was drawing it, I kept mentally calling it the Hienkel.  ;)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on April 09, 2013, 07:25:10 AM
"Hienkel"  ;D  And why not, it's a perfect match!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on May 17, 2013, 01:26:25 PM
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/JapaneseWade1.jpg)

Sorry, you guys will get the full size and full backstory tomorrow.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: GTX_Admin on May 18, 2013, 03:26:10 AM
 :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: apophenia on May 18, 2013, 04:10:07 AM
Beautiful work! Were you ever tempted to incorporate that 'Hienkel' radiator into the float pylon?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: lauhof52 on May 18, 2013, 12:14:08 PM
Very beautiful Logan!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on May 18, 2013, 03:17:59 PM
Thanks for the kind words, everyone!  As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Nakajima-A9He1-N-Wade-Type-2-Floatplane-Fighter-372284570).  I've submitted this to the All Things Floaty GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=3082.0) and also submitted this to the Asiarama GB (http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,36910.0.html) over at the What If Forums.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/JapaneseWade1.jpg) (http://fc09.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2013/137/4/d/nakajima_a9he1_n_wade_type_2_floatplane_fighter_by_comradeloganov-d65ncm2.png)

Full backstory below:

Quote
Realizing an immediate need for a fighter plane that could operate in remote areas of the Pacific where the construction of airfields was impractical, in late 1940, pending production of the fighter floatplane N1K1 Kyofu (code named “Rex”), the Navy issued 15-Shi specifications to Nakajima Kikoki K. K. to develop a floatplane fighter version of the A9He1. Work began on the project, which was known as the AS-1, in February of the following year. Eliminating the undercarriage and retraction mechanism, which was faired over, a unique triangular main strut and two secondary struts were used to mount the single main float; the outrigger floats were mounted on single slender struts. This float system ensured the least amount of drag, yet was sturdy enough for practical seaplane use. The tail wheel was removed and faired over, and to increase lateral stability, a long narrow fin was added to the bottom of the fuselage below the tail assembly and the rudder was extended downward.

The 15-Shi floatplane flew for the first time on 8 December 1941, the same day Operation Hawaii (the attack on Pearl Harbor) was carried out. Production began in April 1942, and under the designation A9He1-N Type 2 Floatplane Fighter, the Navy accepted the new float fighter in July 1942. The type was first encountered at Guadalcanal, later being assigned to the Fifth Air Fleet during the Aleutians campaign, being based on Kiska and Attu, serving as a defensive fighter and reconnaissance fighter.

On the 5th of August 1942 the Dai 5 Kaigun Kokutai (Fifth Air Fleet) was formed with fighter and reconnaissance seaplanes originating from the Tokoh Kaigun Kokutai. Of the twelve fighter seaplanes with which the Kokutai was to be equipped, only six were in working order, those were coming from the Tokoh Kaigun Kokutai. On the 8th of August, during an attack carried out by United States destroyers and cruisers on the seaplane base of Kiska, the fighter seaplane forces were reduced to eight, following the destruction of four of those that were anchored at the aforementioned precarious naval base. The US Navy seaplanes that had been catapulted from the US cruisers also participated in this attack. Ship’s Lieutenant Yamada and the 3rd class naval pilot claimed the destruction of one of these. At this time, the Allies had in the zone a squadron of heavy bombers, two squadrons of medium bombers, four squadrons of fighters, including a Curtiss Kittyhawk squadron belonging to the RCAF (all under USAAF command), a squadron of Grumman F4Fs and another of flying boats, both belonging to the US Navy. During the rest of the month of August, Dai 5 Kaigun Kokutai was involved in the interception of bombers and the US seaplanes, which attacked the Japanese military establishments at Attu and Kiska, failing to obtain any positive results. On the 7th of September, however, the Japanese pilots claimed to have inflicted damage on an enemy seaplane and three bombers. According to the United States’ sources, one seaplane was lost during these actions.

Nakajima’s Koizuma plant built total of 327 A9He1-Ns were produced through September of 1943 when production was terminated. The Allied code name for the A9He1-N was “Wade”. Despite the weight and drag of the floats, these fighters were fast and powerful. They served their mission very well initially, but in a short time they were unable to effectively counter Allied land-based fighters.


This was one of those profiles that just made sense, as far-fetched as it may seem on the surface. When you think “Japanese license-produced He 100 floatplane variant”, it seems like a bit of a logical pretzel to get there, but it was a very natural progression. The IJN wanted to license-produce the He 100 and initially assigned it to Hitachi. Nakajima was eventually contracted to license-build the A6M Zero because they needed enough to equip the land-based squadrons as well as the carrier squadrons. I figure that the IJN would really get excited about the He 100 once they got a good chance to evaluate it and got the production jigs from Heinkel, and would decide to have Nakajima license produce it instead of the A6M since Hitachi was new to the game. So, why would the He 100 become the floatplane fighter instead of the Zero? Because that’s what Nakajima would have been producing at the time, the main reason it was the Zero in the first place.

Sorry it took so long to get this all together.  I hope you all like it!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 15, 2013, 10:12:33 PM
Hey guys, sorry it's been a while since there's been an update.  Talos and I are working on some stuff for the '46 GB and should have a profile or two done for it.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Marge" - Maj. Bong & Johnny Myers
Post by: Logan Hartke on July 16, 2013, 11:43:39 AM
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Northrop-P-61F-Escort-Fighter-Marge-Maj-Bong-385658420).  I've also submitted this to the Asiarama GB (http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,37354.0.html) over at the What If Forums.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/1080px/USAAFWidow2.jpg~original) (http://fc05.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2013/196/b/c/northrop_p_61f_escort_fighter___marge___maj__bong_by_comradeloganov-d6dlzxw.png)

After the unqualified success of the famous mission to kill Admiral Yamamoto in the summer of 1943, the Fifth Air Force spoke with Northrop about the possibility of developing a variant of the P-61 to serve in the very long range day fighter role. This variant would be primarily intended to escort the B-29 in its missions over Japan. After a visit to Northrop to inspect the mockup of the fighter escort proposal, Northrop was given a contract to build 500 long range escort fighters. In order to speed up the development process, the AAF contracted Northrop to build several prototypes to test the various aspects of the new variant. Two XP-61D prototypes would test the turbo-supercharged R-2800 engines on converted P-61As. Two XP-61E prototypes converted from P-61Bs would test the new two seat center fuselage layout with guns in the nose. Finally, a single XP-61F prototype would combine the new features in a final flight test program as the first production aircraft were coming off the line.

The urgency afforded the program would pay off, and the XP-61F first flew in the autumn of 1944. In an effort to further speed up the process of getting the aircraft into combat, experienced P-38 Lightning pilots were sought to train units on the P-61F. Shortly after marrying his sweetheart, Marge Vattendahl in February 1945, Major Richard Bong was asked to return as an instructor to his old unit, V Fighter Command, the first combat unit slated to receive the new aircraft. In preparation for this, Northrop customized a newly completed P-61F for Maj. Bong’s demonstration tour. Based on his famous P-38, the presentation aircraft carried his full 40 kills, the red markings, and even the signature “Marge” photo print.

In spring 1945 both he and the first P-61Fs would arrive in the Pacific and begin combat operations. In order to convince the units coming from P-38s, P-47s, and P-51s of the big new fighter’s considerable speed and maneuverability, famed Northrop test pilot Johnny “The Maestro” Myers accompanied Maj. Bong and put the new aircraft through its paces in front of the best pilots in the PTO. After one flight, they were convinced. The P-61F was the best fighter in the theater and soon it would get a chance to prove itself.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/Detail/USAAFWidow2.jpg~original)

You can see in the detail shot above how much work Talos put into the fantastic graphics for this profile.  On Bong's P-38, the photo of Marge was a pasted on print that was hand-colorized by a member of the squadron.  It often came off in flight and had to be replaced.  Just like the original, Talos painstakingly colorized this one himself.  He went through a number of iterations, but I think you'll agree that it all paid off in the end.  He did the "Marge" text on the aircraft and the customized kill markings, as well.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Marge" - Maj. Bong & Johnny Myers
Post by: Talos on July 16, 2013, 11:52:28 AM
Colorizing that picture was a pain, but it turned out okay. That was the first time I had ever done anything like that, so before I could do it I had to learn how to do it.  ;D The rest of the stuff was simple, the normal kind of graphics I'm used to.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Marge" - Maj. Bong & Johnny Myers
Post by: Matt Wiser on July 16, 2013, 01:30:50 PM
Great job, Logan! And looks like Bong's added to his score from OTL: he had 40.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Marge" - Maj. Bong & Johnny Myers
Post by: Logan Hartke on July 16, 2013, 01:48:09 PM
Thanks!  On the kills, no, that was a kerfluffle of mine.  I put the markings together a few weeks ago, giving myself extra so I could decide which direction to trim (vertically or horizontally) once I got them on the aircraft.  Well, in between the time I made up the layer and I finished the profile, I forgot that I had done that and in an effort to get the profile done in time, I didn't bother to count them all.

I've fixed the images, by the way, but it may take Photobucket a few hours (if not a day) to update the images in all their server caches, so your mileage may vary.  Also, obviously, you'll need to clear your own browser's cache for the past day, but that should do it.

I don't think he'd officially add to his score.  His flight to the Pacific with V Fighter Command was only to be a demonstration flight with test pilot (and civilian) Johnny Myers.  As with Lindbergh, combat would have been expressly forbidden, albeit likely.  I wouldn't have expected him to bag any more.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Marge" - Maj. Bong & Johnny Myers
Post by: lauhof52 on July 17, 2013, 12:51:09 AM
Great job indeed Logan. As Always! Nice details. 8)

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Marge" - Maj. Bong & Johnny Myers
Post by: Matt Wiser on July 17, 2013, 12:04:43 PM
Well, if Bong's flying a VLR mission escorting B-29s to show the guys how it's done, and some Ki-61s, Ki-84s, or Navy Zeroes, Georges, or Jacks come up, he's going to splash whoever gets in front of him.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Marge" - Maj. Bong & Johnny Myers
Post by: Logan Hartke on July 17, 2013, 12:24:58 PM
Thanks, Lauhof!

Oh I agree, Matt.  There are many cases of American pilots (in some instances civilian test pilots) being ordered to avoid combat and stick to training flights but somehow "happening" upon the enemy.  Lindbergh was notorious for this.  In that role, Bong could have added to his score, but it was certainly getting a lot more competitive in the air by that point in the war.  There were fewer Japanese aircraft to go around and a lot more Americans.  I also try not to use the different aircraft the drastically change history since as I've gotten older, I've come to recognize that merely swapping out aircraft types rarely has that monumental of an impact.  You'll notice that I didn't increase the number of kills on any of my He 100 profiles, despite the aircraft being a better performer than the 109.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Marge" - Maj. Bong & Johnny Myers
Post by: Matt Wiser on July 17, 2013, 02:27:07 PM
Lindbergh was unofficially an ace, IIRC.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: M.A.D on July 28, 2013, 11:54:43 AM

([url]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Mi-24%20Hind/900px/IsraeliHind1.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Mi-24%20Hind/IsraeliHind1.jpg[/url])



Wow if any military was going to employ the Hind to its maximum effect, I could see the IDF being the one! Imagine a self-supported Israeli Commando raid into Syria, Lebanon........!!
The other would have been the Rhodesian and South African's! Imagine the Hind replacing the makeshift and limited Aérospatiale Alouette III in the 'Fire Force' mission!!

M.A.D   
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on August 11, 2013, 12:19:53 AM
Wow if any military was going to employ the Hind to its maximum effect, I could see the IDF being the one! Imagine a self-supported Israeli Commando raid into Syria, Lebanon........!!
The other would have been the Rhodesian and South African's! Imagine the Hind replacing the makeshift and limited Aérospatiale Alouette III in the 'Fire Force' mission!!


Yeah, I saw them as a replacement for their early model Cobras still in service.  Also, considering how they employ some of their transport helicopters, I likewise saw them as a potentially effective force.

As for South Africa, I did one of those many moons ago:

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Mi-24%20Hind/900px/SAAFHind1.jpg~original) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Mi-24%20Hind/SAAFHind1.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-84 Jolly Rogers
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 13, 2013, 12:39:15 AM
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Vought-V-507-F-14A-Vagabond-VF-84-Jolly-Rogers-399760503).  It's the Vought V-507, LTV's submission to the VFX competition actually won by the Grumman Tomcat.  I've also submitted this to the Coulda, Woulda, Shoulda GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=3520.0).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/1080px/USNVagabond1.jpg~original) (http://fc01.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2013/255/b/e/vought_v_507_f_14a_vagabond___vf_84_jolly_rogers_by_comradeloganov-d6m096f.png)

After the failure of the F-111B program, the US Navy began looking at alternative options for its replacement carrier fighter. In July 1968, the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) issued a request for proposals (RFP) for the Naval Fighter Experimental (VFX) program. VFX called for a tandem two-seat, twin-engined air-to-air fighter with a maximum speed of Mach 2.2. It would also have a built-in M61 Vulcan cannon and a secondary close air support role. The VFX's air-to-air missiles would be either six AIM-54 Phoenix or a combination of six AIM-7 Sparrow and four AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles. Bids were received from General Dynamics, Grumman, Ling-Temco-Vought, McDonnell Douglas and North American Rockwell; four bids incorporated variable-geometry wings. It was also to use the Pratt & Whitney TF30 engine and AN/AWG-9 radar used on the F-111B to reduce cost and save development time.

Ling-Temco-Vought’s new TF30-powered A-7s were just entering service with the US Navy at that time and the F-8 Crusader was still serving, having earned a reputation for itself over Vietnam as a fine dogfighter. Despite this, swing wing technology was still in its infancy and LTV sought out a company with some experience in this new field. Dassault’s Mirage G prototype fighter was a twin engine, high performance fighter with variable geometry wings. In fact, one prototype was even powered by a variant of the same TF30 engine specified in the VFX program. Already teamed with Lockheed California Co for the VFX competition, the additional technical data provided by Dassault placed the Dallas firm in a strongly competitive position.

Vought’s V-507 proposal would bear a strong resemblance to the Mirage G including the distinctive intake cones found on the Lockheed F-104 and the Dassault Mirage series of fighters. Vought would also build a full scale mockup of the V-507 proposal, the only company in the VFX competition to do so. The maturity of the V-507 design, the experience of Vought with the TF30 engine and variable geometry wings (with Dassault’s assistance), and Vought’s track record on the F-8 and A-7 programs would eventually carry the day. While not considered to be necessarily the fastest or most maneuverable design of those proposed, the V-507 was judged to have the lowest risk of the proposals while still easily meeting all the requirements outlined by NAVAIR. In the wake of the F-111B fiasco, the VFX program was being closely monitored by Congress and this would prove to be a factor in the decision. The Defense Department awarded Ling-Temco-Vought the F-14A contract in January of 1969. The contract was signed on February 3, 1969, and Vought christened the aircraft the Vagabond.

The Vought F-14A Vagabond (BuNo 15798) first flew on November 23, 1970, just 21 months after the contract was signed and nearly two months ahead of schedule. In order to save time and forestall interference from Secretary McNamara, the Navy skipped the prototype phase and jumped directly to full-scale development. The first 12 F-14As Vought produced were earmarked for development and testing. Most of the problems encountered during testing related to the troublesome TF30 engines that would continue to plague the F-14A throughout its service life. Despite this, VF-124, the fleet readiness training squadron, received its first F-14 in March of 1972. The first two F-14 fleet squadrons, VF-1 and VF-2 were commissioned on August 12, 1972 at NAS Miramar. These two squadrons deployed on the USS Enterprise in June, 1974.

The infamous Jolly Rogers, VF-84, began their transition to the Vought F-14A Vagabond in March 1976, becoming operational on the new type in 1977. Together with sister squadron VF-41, they were moved to Carrier Air Wing 8 (CVW-8), deploying aboard the USS Nimitz. They started on their first Tomcat cruise on 1 December 1977, and were at sea until 20 July of 1978. The large single tail of the mighty Vagabond was ideal for a dramatic display of the Jolly Rogers' colors. Changes from the scheme last used on the Phantoms were those mandated by the different fuselage design, although the skull and crossbones motif took on a more modern look. The Vagabond in this profile is presented in its Navy legacy scheme of gull gray over white, with white horizontal control surfaces. The Jolly Rogers adapted well to the Tomcat on this first Med cruise aboard the Nimitz, and the media started to take notice of the sleek new fighters with their colorful livery.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/Detail/AIM-9L-Sidewinder-shaded.png)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/Detail/AIM-7-Sparrow-2-shaded.png)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/Detail/AIM-7-Sparrow-shaded.png)

You can see in the detail shot above how much work Talos and I put into the missiles on the V-507.  Even the above images are less than 20% of their actual size.  Yes, later ones will feature the Phoenix.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-84 Jolly Rogers
Post by: apophenia on September 13, 2013, 03:56:53 AM
Gorgeous!  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-84 Jolly Rogers
Post by: Damian on September 13, 2013, 07:20:05 AM
Stellar work!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-84 Jolly Rogers
Post by: Matt Wiser on September 13, 2013, 09:00:26 AM
Nice job! Though MacNamara would've been out of office by the time the contract was awarded. And where's the Vulcan gun on this aircraft? That was a VFX requirement.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-84 Jolly Rogers
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 13, 2013, 09:11:11 AM
Thanks apophenia, damian, and Matt!  Matt, I know he would have been out by that time, but that was a concern of the DoD.  In fact, I took that portion of the text from the Wikipedia page on the F-14.  In another book I have on Grumman that covers the F-14, they describe the contract as a "McNamara special".

As for the Vulcan, Vought put theirs on the right side.  I'm not just saying that so we didn't have to draw it, that's where the cutaway puts it.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-84 Jolly Rogers
Post by: Talos on September 13, 2013, 10:09:11 AM
Specifically the gun is built in underneath the engine intake on the starboard side, with the muzzle fairing located in between the outer and center forward Sparrow mounts.

To illustrate it, here's one of the section cuts from the V-507. If you're looking at the profile, this is from the vertical panel line cutting through the second "S" in "USS Nimitz", facing forward. You can see the gun on the starboard side between the two Sparrows.

(http://i.imgur.com/cU1Jz9tl.png)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-84 Jolly Rogers
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 13, 2013, 10:14:42 AM
You can also see how impressive it is that they got 10 missiles on the plane without putting a single one on the wings.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-84 Jolly Rogers
Post by: Matt Wiser on September 14, 2013, 10:05:56 AM
I take it Phoenix would've been on pallets, just as it was on the real-world F-14, then? Any chance of a second work showing an AIM-54 armed example?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-84 Jolly Rogers
Post by: Talos on September 14, 2013, 10:37:19 AM
I take it Phoenix would've been on pallets, just as it was on the real-world F-14, then? Any chance of a second work showing an AIM-54 armed example?


In a word, yes. We do plan on doing other loadouts like Phoenix, drop-tanks, and maybe A2G ordnance in the future.

Phoenix were mounted on pylons similar to the Sparrow ones here, but larger. The centerline ones were as well, they weren't recessed like the Sparrows.

It's small, but here's a good shot of three of them installed on the mockup.

(http://i.imgur.com/igeKf9m.jpg)

In a fleet defense role, it could carry six of these, plus two tanks, but I'm also seeing a loadout of two Phoenix, two Sidewinders, and four Sparrows on the mockup, which was probably more of a normal CAP loadout.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-84 Jolly Rogers
Post by: Matt Wiser on September 14, 2013, 11:44:12 AM
And an IIAF bird, I imagine....
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-84 Jolly Rogers
Post by: GTX_Admin on September 14, 2013, 02:28:15 PM
And an IIAF bird, I imagine....

Oh yeah!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-84 Jolly Rogers
Post by: taiidantomcat on September 15, 2013, 11:55:02 PM
And an IIAF bird, I imagine....

I like the way you think  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-84 Jolly Rogers
Post by: dy031101 on September 16, 2013, 08:55:55 AM
Bada*s!  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-84 Jolly Rogers
Post by: lauhof52 on September 18, 2013, 08:40:37 PM
Excellent work, Logan!!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Captured Japanese Viking/Stuka
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 21, 2013, 10:53:44 AM
I spent so much time on the V-507, I decided to take a break from it and work on something completely different.  So, to change things up a bit I did a profile of a Vought modification of a European design with an unconventional wing, tailored to meet US Navy requirements as an alternative to a truly classic Navy aircraft.  Oh, wait.

Well, it felt different to me at the time.  So, without further ado...

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/JapaneseViking2.jpg) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/JapaneseViking2.jpg~original)

Ordered by the ML-KNIL for the Dutch East Indies, the V-187-N3 was similar in confiuration to the Norwegian V-187-N2 pattern aircraft.  Not many aircraft were delivered before the Dutch East Indies fell to the Japanese, so they had little impact on the campaign, a number of the aircraft being captured by the Japanese when they took the islands.  This particular aircraft was tested by the Tachikawa Army Aerotechnical Research Institute.

I've also submitted this to the Asiarama GB (http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,37685.0.html) over at the What If Forums.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Captured Japanese Viking/Stuka
Post by: lauhof52 on September 21, 2013, 03:39:44 PM
Very nice one , Logan. I love to see you do a Vought SB4U again!! 8)

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Captured Japanese Viking/Stuka
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 21, 2013, 11:34:52 PM
Thanks, Lauhof!  I knew you would be glad to see me getting back to these.  Still working my way towards the Midway birds but there's a few that I want to do before I get there.  You should still like them, though.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Captured Japanese Viking/Stuka
Post by: GTX_Admin on September 22, 2013, 04:16:04 AM
Sweet!!!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Captured Japanese Viking/Stuka
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 22, 2013, 01:33:24 PM
Thanks, guys!  Watch this space (especially you, lauhof!), because I should be able to do another one in the next couple of days.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Captured Japanese Viking/Stuka
Post by: lauhof52 on September 22, 2013, 09:47:14 PM
Thanks, guys!  Watch this space (especially you, lauhof!), because I should be able to do another one in the next couple of days.

Cheers,

Logan

Looking forward to it, Logan!! (..and still hoping for the Midwaystuff..)
regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - "Shwab's Wagon" - The Story of an A-19 Viking
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 23, 2013, 07:13:03 AM
Anybody ready for another?  There is a long backstory for this one, but I don't want to clutter this thread with a GWOT (Giant Wall of Text), so I've posted the full story in its own thread over in the Stories forum.  I recommend checking it out to anyone who enjoys a good story.  I can recommend it without shame since I didn't write most of it.  I pieced it together from about three sources and modified it to suit the profile with just a the minor addition surrounding the pilot's personalized markings.  See that thread here: "Shwab's Wagon" - The Story of an A-19 Viking (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=3561.0)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/USAAFViking2.jpg) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/USAAFViking2.jpg~original)

While operating from 7-Mile Drome at Port Moresby, this aircraft was primarily flown by Captain Virgil Schwab. Capt. Schwab had the ground crew paint “Schwab’s Wagon” on the side of the aircraft in big bubble letters, but the soldier that painted the marking on the aircraft misspelled Schwab’s name, leaving out the “c”. Schwab took it with humor, however, and decided to leave “Shwab’s Wagon” as it was.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Detail/USAAFViking2.jpg~original)

Thanks to Talos for providing the excellent "Shwab's Wagon" marking seen here on the side of the plane!  He did a great job with it!

I've also submitted this to the Asiarama GB (http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,37685.msg611801.html#msg611801) over at the What If Forums.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 23, 2013, 01:01:57 PM
It's been a good weekend.  Who wants another?  Remember the natural metal finish Vikings from days of yore?  How about another for old time's sake?

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/ArgentinianViking1.jpg) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/ArgentinianViking1.jpg~original)

The Vought V-187-A was an export version of the Viking intended for the Fuerza Aérea Argentina. Northrop test pilot Eddie Allen had demonstrated the Northrop Model 5B in Buenos Aires in 1935, and the FAA was looking at purchasing the Douglas Model 8A in 1937, but a Vought tour of South America with the V-187 company prototype would end up convincing a number of air forces to go with the Vought product instead. This was in no small part due to the goodwill Vought had built up with their sales of the Corsair throughout South America over the past ten years. In fact, the Vought Corsair would be the very plane the Viking was replacing in many of those air forces, including Argentina's. The FAA ordered 30 V-187-As in 1937, and these were shipped to Argentina between February and March 1938. As with the other early export orders, the aircraft were not equipped with the bomb displacement gear for reasons of security. Vought construction numbers were 1531 to 1560. FAA serials were A-401 through A-430 (later O-401 through O-430). The V-187-As were operated by the Fuerza Aérea Argentina's Grupo A de la Escuela de Aplicación de Aviación, Comanda de Aviación de Ejercito from El Palomar.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: lauhof52 on September 23, 2013, 02:32:19 PM
Wow, Logan, excellent work - especially the USAAF-one! My compliments! :P

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 23, 2013, 11:19:53 PM
Thanks, lauhof!  More Vikings should be coming soon!  I'm still slowly marching towards Midway.  Not too much more to do now.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 24, 2013, 09:08:25 AM
Still south of the border for this one.  Interestingly, I found another combat mission for the Viking on July 29th, 1941.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/PeruvianViking1.jpg) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/PeruvianViking1.jpg~original)

In 1939, Lt. Cmdt. Armando Revoredo Iglesias CAP traveled to the United States to oversee the purchase of new aircraft, among which were the Vought V-187. The Vought V-187-PE was an export version of the Viking for the Cuerpo Aeronáutico del Perú. A total of ten V-187-PEs were built (company numbers 1612 to 1621). On June 1st, 1939 the first three aircraft took off from the Vought factory, commanded by Revoredo himself, for their over 7,000 mile delivery flight to Lima. They arrived on the 5th of June after a direct flight from Panama, landing at Limatambo Airport at 5:45pm. After arriving, they were assigned to the XXXI Escuadrón de Información Estratégica y Ataque "Zorros" (31st Strategic Reconnaissance and Attack Squadron "Foxes") based in Las Palmas.

In early 1940 the Peruvian government decided to use the Viking for a goodwill flight throughout South America. Five V-187-PEs from the "Zorros" were chosen for this flight, once again under the command of Armando Revoredo Iglesias, now promoted to Comandante de Aeronáutica. The flight began on Saturday March 23rd, 1940 with the Lima-Quito leg, then proceeded to Bogota, Panama, Caracas, Paramaribo, Belém do Pará, Rio de Janeiro, Asuncion, Montevideo, Buenos Aires, Santiago, and La Paz, finally getting back to Lima on May 3, being greeted by a large crowd at Limatambo having flown a total of 11,000 miles.

In July 1941, the Vikings of XXXI Squadron would have their baptism of fire in the Ecuadorian–Peruvian War. The "Zorros" took part in reconnaissance flights, bombing Ecuadorian positions, and even providing air cover for the airborne landing that seized the Ecuadorian port city of Puerto Bolívar, on July 27, 1941. This was the first time in the Americas that airborne troops were used in combat. On July 29th, the 92 Escuadrilla of the XXXI was chosen for an attack on the Arenillas Bridge and Santa Rosa Central Railroad. Lt. Cmdt. Manuel Polidoro García piloted XXXI-92-1 in this attack which caused considerable damage to the bridge and rail line.

By the way, anyone interested in that actual combat history of the Douglas 8A-3Ps from the Ecuadorian-Peruvian War of July 1941 should really check out this awesome color footage on YouTube.

YouTube - Peruvian Air Force Campaign of 1941. Campaña de 1941. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v73kiL6f4gs#)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: lauhof52 on September 24, 2013, 02:50:50 PM
Peruvian one is very nice! :) :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: GTX_Admin on September 25, 2013, 05:56:57 AM
And so believable!! :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 25, 2013, 12:52:46 PM
Lauhof, the time has finally arrived. The Battle of Midway has begun!

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/USAAFViking3.jpg) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/USAAFViking3.jpg~original)

When Pearl Harbor was attacked on Dec. 7th, 1941, the US was ill-prepared for war.  Many American combat aircraft through the Pacific were still in bare metal.  Japanese ace Saburō Sakai recorded that in the first strike against Clark Field the Tainan Zeros could see the reflection of the sun from the bare metal B-17s from many miles out. There were still aircraft passing through Hawaii after the attack in bare metal and the Hawaiian Air Depot was instructed to paint them. New paint specifications and colors were in short supply and so they referred (loosely) to some experimental pre-war test specs and used whatever colors were available. As a result, a number of the aircraft that came out of the Hawaiian Air Depot sported colorful, non-standard paint schemes.

One such unit to pass through Hawaii was the 22nd Bombardment Group equipped largely with B-26 Marauders.  It did, however, retain one squadron of A-19 Vikings in the 18th Reconnaissance Squadron.  When the 22nd transferred to Australia, it left the 18th at Midway, primarily to practice the art of dropping torpedoes along with the 69th BS (Bombardment Squadron) from the 38th BG, also equipped with the A-19 Viking.  When the Japanese carrier force was spotted a PBY Catalina at 0530 on 4th June, 1942, the Vikings of the 18th RS and 69th BS were among the first bombers to strike from Midway, taking off at 0600, some armed with a 500 lb bomb each, the rest carrying torpedoes.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: lauhof52 on September 25, 2013, 02:29:48 PM
Thanks a lot, Logan! I appreciate it. Very nice story to introduce the Battle of Midway and an excellent A-19 you made here- love to hear more of it!! :-*

regards
Lauhof

PS. I think you meant 4th of June 1942 - slip of the pen. ;)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 25, 2013, 10:12:11 PM
Right you are!  Good eye!  Fixed.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 26, 2013, 05:37:19 AM
By the way, in case anyone was wondering, the crazy 5-color camouflage is a real paint scheme from Midway, too.

(http://img.wp.scn.ru/camms/ar/439/pics/3_68.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v71/Nathan_Milarta/WWII%20photos/B-17E.jpg)

John Ford's "The Battle of Midway" (1942) Digitally Restored (http://youtu.be/MW8tQ_6dqS8?t=3m58s)

Go to 3:58 on the video to see the B-17s with the camouflage.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: Weaver on September 26, 2013, 07:53:50 AM
That 5-colour cammo looks great!  :-*

I love the Vikings Logan - they're so credible that you really have to look twice and squint to work out just what's going on... :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 26, 2013, 11:43:59 AM
That 5-colour cammo looks great!  :-*

I love the Vikings Logan - they're so credible that you really have to look twice and squint to work out just what's going on... :)

Thanks, Weaver!  It's one that I'd been wanting to do for a while and I thought it turned out alright.  It's just so crazy.

So, anyone remember when I made that torpedo for the Viking (http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,20962.msg388466.html#msg388466) four years ago?  Yeah, didn't think so.  Anyway, it finally found its way onto a profile!  Yeah, I know, my pace is pretty slow, but all told I've done about 200 profiles now, so slowly but surely...

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/USAAFViking4.jpg) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/USAAFViking4.jpg~original)

While a number of the USAAF Vikings from conducted a low angle bombing attack on the Japanese carriers, four came in at wave top level armed with torpedoes. While the Viking was originally modified to carry a torpedo for the Marine-Luchtvaartdienst of the Dutch East Indies, it would not see combat in this role until the June 4th, 1942 during the Battle of Midway. It was not an auspicious start.

The A6M Zeros protecting the carriers attacked the Vikings without mercy. None of the USAAF Vikings scored any hits on the Japanese carriers during the Battle of Midway, and most were lost in the attempt. One A-19, after being seriously damaged by anti-aircraft fire, veered into a steep dive straight toward the Akagi. Making no attempt to pull out of its run, the aircraft narrowly missed crashing directly into the carrier's bridge, which could have potentially killed Nagumo and his command staff. This experience may well have contributed to Nagumo's determination to launch another attack on Midway, in direct violation of Yamamoto's order to keep the reserve strike force armed for anti-ship operations.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: lauhof52 on September 27, 2013, 01:51:54 AM
That 5-colour cammo looks great!  :-*

I love the Vikings Logan - they're so credible that you really have to look twice and squint to work out just what's going on... :)

Thanks, Weaver!  It's one that I'd been wanting to do for a while and I thought it turned out alright.  It's just so crazy.

So, anyone remember when I made that torpedo for the Viking ([url]http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,20962.msg388466.html#msg388466[/url]) four years ago?  Yeah, didn't think so.  Anyway, it finally found its way onto a profile!  Yeah, I know, my pace is pretty slow, but all told I've done about 200 profiles now, so slowly but surely...

([url]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/USAAFViking4.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/USAAFViking4.jpg~original[/url])

While a number of the USAAF Vikings from conducted a low angle bombing attack on the Japanese carriers, four came in at wave top level armed with torpedoes. While the Viking was originally modified to carry a torpedo for the Marine-Luchtvaartdienst of the Dutch East Indies, it would not see combat in this role until the June 4th, 1942 during the Battle of Midway. It was not an auspicious start.

The A6M Zeros protecting the carriers attacked the Vikings without mercy. None of the USAAF Vikings scored any hits on the Japanese carriers during the Battle of Midway, and most were lost in the attempt. One A-19, after being seriously damaged by anti-aircraft fire, veered into a steep dive straight toward the Akagi. Making no attempt to pull out of its run, the aircraft narrowly missed crashing directly into the carrier's bridge, which could have potentially killed Nagumo and his command staff. This experience may well have contributed to Nagumo's determination to launch another attack on Midway, in direct violation of Yamamoto's order to keep the reserve strike force armed for anti-ship operations.

Cheers,

Logan


This is a really nice A-19, Logan! I love it :-*  With the coloring and the torpedo! Of course I do remember the torpedo version. You made a Dutch Viking with it and as you know it is hanging on the wall at my place. Is it possible you send this one to me without the blue background? The story of Midway evolves very nicely.

regards
lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 27, 2013, 02:13:04 AM
Thanks, lauhof!  I'm glad you like it!  Check your email and let me know if it works for you or if you want it modified.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: lauhof52 on September 27, 2013, 03:49:59 AM
Thanks, lauhof!  I'm glad you like it!  Check your email and let me know if it works for you or if you want it modified.

Cheers,

Logan

Thanks Logan, done! :)

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: taiidantomcat on September 27, 2013, 04:21:51 AM
Hot Damn on that camo :-* Never saw that before! :o Learn something new everyday and it looks great on your profile, Logan  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 27, 2013, 07:41:47 AM
The story behind this profile is straightforward.  It needs no elaboration on my part.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/USMCViking3.jpg) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/USMCViking3.jpg~original)

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to

CAPTAIN RICHARD E. FLEMING
UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS RESERVE

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

Quote
    For extraordinary heroism and conspicuous intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty as Flight Officer, Marine Scout-Bombing Squadron TWO FORTY-ONE during action against enemy Japanese forces in the Battle of Midway on June 4 and 5, 1942. When his squadron Commander was shot down during the initial attack upon an enemy aircraft carrier, Captain Fleming led the remainder of the division with such fearless determination that he dived his own plane to the perilously low altitude of four hundred feet before releasing his bomb. Although his craft was riddled by 179 hits in the blistering hail of fire that burst upon him from Japanese fighter guns and antiaircraft batteries, he pulled out with only two minor wounds inflicted upon himself. On the night of June 4, when the Squadron Commander lost his way and became separated from the others, Captain Fleming brought his own plane in for a safe landing at its base despite hazardous weather conditions and total darkness. The following day, after less than four hours' sleep, he led the second division of his squadron in a coordinated glide-bombing and dive- bombing assault upon a Japanese battleship. Undeterred by a fateful approach glide, during which his ship was struck and set afire, he grimly pressed home his attack to an altitude of five hundred feet, released his bomb to score a near-miss on the stern of his target, then crashed to the sea in flames. His dauntless perseverance and unyielding devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: apophenia on September 27, 2013, 10:48:50 AM
Logan, the Midways profiles are wonderful ... but the Hawaiian Air Depot scheme takes the cake! Love it  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: lauhof52 on September 27, 2013, 04:17:35 PM
Great profile Logan! and top to read the Citation! Keeping up the good work. :)

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 28, 2013, 03:10:28 AM
Thanks taiidan and apophenia!  I'm glad you liked the camo!  A lot of US equipment in WWII got a coat of OD and called it a day.  There are enough examples of exceptions, though, and they aren't generally well-known.  That's one of the reasons I do profiles.  I like to bring attention to those.

Thanks, lauhof!  Fair warning, I'm probably going to have to put a hold on the Navy Vikings because I need to do some research, complete some new ordnance, and take the weekend off.  So, you might get a new profile tomorrow, but I think sometime next week is more likely.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: Empty Handed on September 30, 2013, 08:49:48 PM
Love the camo'd Vikings, especially the 2-tone on 1424!  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: Nexus1171 on October 09, 2013, 09:34:23 AM
SB4U "Viking"

1.) I thought the 87's canopy was more curved like a fighter (slanted down in the back, and a turret sort of forming the aft glass section of the aircraft's canopy)?

2.) I'd think you'd want to use a different cowling (sometime more streamlined) or a bigger engine?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: Logan Hartke on October 09, 2013, 10:32:24 AM
The canopy is totally new, but based somewhat on the SBD's.  The actual Stuka's canopy actual went through 3 major production variants.  I doubt any of them would have been considered acceptable by the US.  Since Vought would have been working with the Stuka prototype, they'd have had a canopy that nobody much cared for and I think it would have been one of the first things to change.  Furthermore, I needed something looked more generic and less readily identifiable as a Stuka's canopy.

Regarding the engine, it's an R-1830, which would have been perfect for the mid- to late-1930s competing against the R-1820-powered Northrop XBT-2.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ab/Northrop_XBT-2_July_1938.jpg/778px-Northrop_XBT-2_July_1938.jpg)

The Stuka's fuselage is actually quite small and narrow.  That would make incorporating most radial engines difficult on the airframe, and that's the only type of engine the Navy used on carriers.  Despite that, I have been looking at my options for increasing power available on the aircraft.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Victory At Sea - Midway Is East
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 07, 2013, 02:11:10 PM
As per usual with the Vikings, note that this is reduced to 33%.  Click on the profile to see it on Photobucket where you can click again and see it at 100%.  I've also submitted this to the Clear Your Workbench GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=3748.0) and the Asiarama GB (http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,37685.0.html) at the What If forums.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/USNViking10.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/?action=view&current=USNViking10.jpg)

Finally, we're getting around to the USN Vikings at the Battle of Midway.  The first profile depicts an aircraft from the only dive-bomber squadron from the Yorktown or Enterprise to not participate in the sinking of any of the four Japanese carriers.  Not only this, but it was the only true Yorktown squadron on board the ship in what would be its most famous (and final) battle.  This was "Scouting" Five (V"S"-5).  Why the quotation marks?  Well, that wasn't even the squadron's actual designation.

To explain all this, we need to look at the squadrons that were typically found on US fleet carriers at the start of WWII.  You would have one squadron of fighters, two squadrons of dive bombers, and one squadron of torpedo bombers--four squadrons in total.  These squadrons all shared the same number, and this number corresponded to the carrier's hull number.  So, for instance, the USS Enterprise (CV-5) had four squadrons: Fighting Six (VF-6), Scouting Six (VS-6), Bombing Six (VB-6), and Torpedo Six (VT-6).  So, what's so unusual?  The Yorktown had VF-5, VS-5, VB-5, and VT-5, right?  Well, yes...and no.  At the Battle of Coral Sea, it had all four of these squadrons and they did very well, but the Yorktown was damaged in the battle and its squadrons likewise suffered serious losses.  As a result, when it returned to Pearl for repairs after the Battle of Coral Sea, only VB-5 remained on the carrier.  Well, now it was missing three squadrons.  Where was the US Navy going to find three trained, fully equipped carrier squadrons just lying around with nothing to do?  Well, right there at Pearl.

(http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/k14000/k14254.jpg)

Sorry, more explanation is needed here.  When Pearl Harbor was attacked on December 7th, 1941, the United States had seven carriers: USS Lexington, Saratoga, Ranger, Yorktown, Enterprise, Wasp, and Hornet (CV-2 through -8, respectively).  Of these, the Ranger and the Wasp would spend the first few months of the war in the Atlantic and the newly commissioned Hornet was still training up and getting ready for the Doolittle Raid in April.  Its air group would see its first major action at Midway (and an inauspicious start it would be!).  That just left the Lexington, Saratoga, Yorktown, and Enterprise.  Well, as we well know, the Lexington and Yorktown would participate in the world's first major carrier vs. carrier action at Coral Sea where the Lexington was lost.  The Enterprise was raiding Japanese outposts throughout the Pacific and also escorted the Hornet during the Doolittle Raid.  Well, what about the Saratoga?  Unfortunately, the Saratoga was a bit of an unlucky ship.  Every time she got ready to take the battle to the Japanese, she would get torpedoed by a Japanese submarine (or otherwise damaged) and have to return to the US for repairs.  As a result, she didn't participate in many of the major US carrier battles of the early war.  Having been torpedoed by the I-6 on 11 January, 1942, she limped back to Pearl where she unloaded VF-3, VB-3, and VT-3.  She retained VS-3 as protection for the voyage back to the West Coast.  So, from January to May, these squadrons sat at Pearl waiting for something to do.  That "something" pulled into port on 27 May, 1942, when the Yorktown sailed into Pearl for repairs.

(http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g40000/g41197.jpg)

When the Yorktown set sail from Pearl on 30 May, she did so with VF-3, VB-3, and VT-3 from the Saratoga plus VB-5 from the Yorktown.  So, where did "VS-5" come from?  Well, as mentioned earlier US carriers were only used to have one squadron of each type on board a carrier at that point in the war--Fighting, Scouting, Bombing, and Torpedo.  To avoid confusion from having two "Bombing" squadrons, Yorktown's own VB-5 was temporarily redesignated "VS-5", or "Scouting Five".  Since the Scouting and Bombing squadrons used the same aircraft, had the same basic training, and could be used almost interchangeably as the situation required, a redesignation was all that was needed.

(http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g600000/g640553.jpg)

So, why didn't "Scouting" Five not participate in the attacks on the four Japanese carriers that so defined the Battle of Midway?  Fletcher decided to hold them in reserve during the strikes, much to the consternation of the aircrew of "Scouting" Five.  A number of VS-5's aircraft were lost when Yorktown was hit and sunk, but a number of them made it to the Enterprise to carry on the fight, along with aircraft from Yorktown's other squadrons (those "borrowed" from Saratoga).  In fact, due to fuel shortage, a number of aircraft from Hornet also landed on the Enterprise on the night of 5 June.  As a result, the Enterprise had a truly composite air wing on the morning of 6 June with aircraft from the Saratoga (CV-3), Yorktown (CV-5), Enterprise (CV-6), and Hornet (CV-8).  When the Japanese light cruisers Mikuma and Mogami were attacked on 6 June, "Scouting" Five finally got their chance to exact revenge for the loss of Yorktown, sinking Mikuma and heavily damaging Mogami.

(http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/k00001/k00459.jpg)

All of Yorktown's squadrons would participate in the Battle of Midway and their combat actions along with the sinking of the Yorktown would account for the loss of many aircraft and aircrew, including those of the Saratoga squadrons.  The tragic irony in all of this, however, was that the recently repaired Saratoga would pull into Pearl Harbor on 6 June, 1942, only to find that only a week earlier its squadrons had left on the Yorktown for Midway and the Saratoga had arrived only days too late to participate in what was certainly one of the most important carrier battles in naval history.

Victory at Sea - Midway Is East (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vrJQTgx_XI4#)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Victory At Sea - Midway Is East
Post by: lauhof52 on November 07, 2013, 03:50:31 PM
Perfect! Logan. Nice to see Midway back on track again!  And thanks for the great story!  :)

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Victory At Sea - Midway Is East
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 07, 2013, 11:49:14 PM
In case anyone was wondering why it's so beaten up, it's probably because the Yorktown had been involved in about 6 months of nearly continuous combat, including the Battle of Coral Sea.  The planes of VB-5 (renamed VS-5) were in the thick of it the whole time.  They didn't seem to have much time for repainting or touch ups.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e5/SBD-3_VS-5_on_USS_Yorktown_Midway.jpg/770px-SBD-3_VS-5_on_USS_Yorktown_Midway.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Victory At Sea - Midway Is East
Post by: Empty Handed on November 08, 2013, 07:59:46 PM
Well I for one think your VS-5 Viking's 'beaten up' look really works.  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Victory At Sea - Midway Is East
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 08, 2013, 10:29:45 PM
Thanks, Empty Handed!

In all my shortcuts I use to post, I accidentally overwrote the earlier post.  I've fixed that, now I just need to post the new one!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Victory At Sea - Midway Is East
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 08, 2013, 10:30:23 PM
As per usual with the Vikings, note that this is reduced to 33%.  Click on the profile to see it on Photobucket where you can click again and see it at 100%.  I've also submitted this to the Clear Your Workbench GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=3748.msg57179#msg57179) and the Asiarama GB (http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,37685.msg616963.html#msg616963) at the What If Forums.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/USNViking11.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/?action=view&current=USNViking11.jpg)

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the NAVY CROSS to

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8b/Richard_Halsey_Best.jpg)(http://projects.militarytimes.com/citations-medals-awards/assets/images/awards/medals_navy_cross_100x200.jpg)

LIEUTENANT COMMANDER RICHARD HALSEY BEST
UNITED STATES NAVY

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

Quote
    For extraordinary heroism in operations against the enemy while serving as Pilot of a carrier-based Navy Bomber and Squadron Commander in Bombing Squadron SIX (VB-6), attached to the U.S.S. ENTERPRISE (CV-6), during the "Air Battle of Midway," against enemy Japanese forces on 4 - 6 June 1942. Defying extreme danger from concentrated anti-aircraft barrage and powerful fighter opposition, Lieutenant Commander Best, with bold determination and courageous zeal, led his squadron in dive-bombing assaults against Japanese naval units. Flying at a distance from his own forces which rendered return unlikely because of probable fuel exhaustion, he pressed home his attacks with extreme disregard for his own personal safety. His gallant intrepidity and loyal devotion to duty contributed greatly to the success of our forces and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


This is going to be the final profile in the Midway series and, as you can see, I've saved the Best for last (pun absolutely intended).  Of the aviators that took direct part in the Battle of Midway, LCdr "Dick" Best was perhaps the most extraordinary.  He participated in both attacks on the Japanese carriers that took place on 4 June.  In fact, he was almost single-handedly responsible for the destruction of Akagi.

After contact reports of Midway-based PBY Catalina patrol aircraft on the morning of June 4, 1942, Enterprise started to launch her air group starting on 07:06h.  Under the overall command of the air group commander (CEAG) Lt.Cdr. Wade McClusky were 14 TBD-1 Devastator torpedo bombers of Torpedo Squadron 6 (VT-6), 34 SB4U-4 Vikings of VB-6, the CEAG section, and VS-6, and ten F4F-4 Wildcat fighters of Fighting Squadron 6 (VF-6).  However, the squadrons became separated and reached the Japanese independently. Only the dive bombers stayed together and reached the enemy by 09:55h.  At about 10:22h the Enterprise dive bombers started to attack two Japanese carriers, which proved to be the Kaga, and the Akagi.

(http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g700000/g701869.jpg)

At this point, the attack became confused, as all 34 Vikings started to attack Kaga, and none the Akagi.  Obviously, Best expected to attack according to the U.S. dive bomber doctrine.  This was that VB-6 would attack the nearer carrier (in that case Kaga) and VS-6 the one further away (here Akagi).  The three-plane CEAG section was expected to attack last, as their planes were equipped with cameras to assess the damage later.  However, evidently McClusky was not aware of this, having been a fighter pilot until becoming CEAG.  Therefore McClusky began his dive on Kaga, being followed by VS-6, and Best's VB-6 was also attacking Kaga according to doctrine. Lieutenant Best noticed the error and broke off with his two wingmen to attack the Akagi.

(http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g700000/g701870.jpg)

At 10:26h Best's three SB4Us attacked the Akagi.  The first bomb, dropped by Lt.(jg) Edwin John Kroeger, missed.  The second bomb, aimed by Ens. Frederick Thomas Weber, landed in the water, near the stern.  The force wave of that hit jammed the Akagi's rudder.  The last bomb, dropped by Best, punched though the flight deck and exploded in the upper hangar, in the middle of 18 Nakajima B5N2 planes, parked there.  That hit doomed the Akagi.  Later that day, Lieutenant Best participated in the attack on the last remaining Japanese carrier - the Hiryū, possibly scoring one of the four hits.  After the battle, Best was awarded the Navy Cross and the Distinguished Flying Cross.

(http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/h73000/h73065.jpg)

However, on the morning flight Best had tested an oxygen bottle to be sure that it was not leaking caustic soda.  Best's first inhalation was then filled with gas fumes.  He snorted the gas fumes out, not thinking about it anymore.  The next day Best began to cough up blood repeatedly.  The flight surgeon found out that the gas fumes had activated latent tuberculosis.  He entered the hospital at Pearl Harbor on June 24, 1942.  After undergoing 32 months of treatment, Richard Best retired from the US Navy in 1944.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Scottish Skorpions - "The Lochness Monster"
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 09, 2013, 02:07:57 PM
As per usual, click on the profile to see it at a larger size.  I've also submitted this to the Scottish Independence GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=3750.0).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Frogfoot/900px/ScottishSkorpion1.jpg~original) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Frogfoot/ScottishSkorpion1.jpg~original)

Wow, here's an aircraft type that I haven't touched in a long time!  And boy does it show...  So much I'd redo on this one if I had the time.  Anyway, no time for the backstory tonight, so you will all get the full write-up later, hopefully tomorrow night, may not be until next week.

Short version, the scheme is based on the Coastal Command aircraft flown by No. 612 Squadron in WWII.  The aircraft is being operated by a recently independent Royal Scottish Air Force in a not-too-distant hypothetical future.  I'll also post the versions of the roundel in a larger size when I do the full write-up.  I hope you all like it!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Scottish Skorpions - "The Lochness Monster"
Post by: lauhof52 on November 09, 2013, 03:44:50 PM
WOW! 8)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Scottish Skorpions - "The Lochness Monster"
Post by: Empty Handed on November 10, 2013, 04:36:01 AM
I'm a real fan of your Frogfeet/Scorpii in general and this one in particular!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Scottish Skorpions - "The Lochness Monster"
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 10, 2013, 11:38:25 AM
Thanks, guys!  I'm glad you liked it!

So, I'm not too concerned about the details of the transition, but in this scenario, Scotland would end up as a constitutional monarchy, like Canada and Australia.  I did this mainly to keep the roundels and squadrons consistent.  So, as for the Skorpion, though, my idea was that a newly independent Scotland would have a need for an aircraft with a good maritime strike capability that could be used in the air policing role if necessary.  As such, this L-239 has wing tanks, a Litening III targeting pod, Paveway IIs, Mavericks, and AMRAAMs.  It could be fitted with more dedicated anti-ship missiles, if necessary.  I expected that Scotland would have the lineage of at least No. 602, 603, and 612 squadrons transferred with its independence.  In this scenario, Scotland gives 612 Sqn. an active military role again, equipping it with the L-239 in the anti-shipping/strike role.  Oh, by the way, can anyone that speaks Scots Gaelic tell me if I got the translation for Royal Scottish Air Force right?  I tried.

As for the roundel itself, it definitely pays homage to the RAF's roundel and is done in the style of Australia's and Canada's roundels, as well.  The lion is a major difference, however, and it's done in the style of the kangaroo in the RAAF roundel, kiwi in RNZAF roundel, and springbok in the old SAAF roundel.  I know the thistle may be the more appropriate national symbol, but it seemed less martial for a military insignia compared to the lion.  The standard Scottish lion is a bit...intricate for a roundel, so I took the somewhat simplified but still appropriate lion from British Caledonian's logo.  The other big difference is the color blue.  This lighter blue comes from Scottish Saltire instead of the darker blue on the Union Jack.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/RSAF_4.jpg~original)

In the basic, full color variant above, it's seen with the full roundel and Scottish flag as the fin flash.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/RSAF_2.jpg~original)

In this variant, the colors are retained, but with the omission of the fin flash, the same angled cross is overlaid on the roundel.  I really like the way this looked.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/RSAF_3.jpg~original)

Finally, here's the low vis roundel.  It's a variant of the roundel with the cross.  You can see this on the upperside of the wings on the Skorpion profile, too.  When I design my own roundels, this is a pet peeve of mine.  I like a roundel that retains its unique look when all the color is removed and this does that very well, I think.

Hope you all like it!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - More new Vikings/Stukas!
Post by: elmayerle on November 10, 2013, 01:45:00 PM
The Stuka's fuselage is actually quite small and narrow.  That would make incorporating most radial engines difficult on the airframe, and that's the only type of engine the Navy used on carriers.  Despite that, I have been looking at my options for increasing power available on the aircraft.
Consider the fairings and exhaust installation on the Fw-190A et al., that could work for fitting a larger radial to the slim airframe.  See also the Ki-100 engine installation.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Scottish Skorpions - "The Lochness Monster"
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 10, 2013, 10:48:59 PM
Oh, exactly.  The P-36 and CW-21 are also great examples of this.  It's absolutely possible, but this is also a reason why you won't be seeing an R-2600 on this ever.

(http://img.wp.scn.ru/camms/ar/78/pics/3_14_a1.jpg)

(http://alternathistory.org.ua/files/users/user1884/curtiss_cw21_3v.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - New Poll! - What should I do next?
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 11, 2013, 10:24:32 AM
Hey everyone, I've added a new poll.  Let me know what profile you'd most like to see me do next.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - New Poll! - What should I do next?
Post by: Vuk on November 11, 2013, 03:37:42 PM
Hey, Logan!

Beautiful job on a scottish roundel (perhaps to do a slightly smaller lion?).
About a poll: one of (so far) two votes for He 100 is mine. How about a float variant in a Mad Max style?

Greetings, Vuk
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - New Poll! - What should I do next?
Post by: finsrin on November 11, 2013, 03:49:21 PM
A whiff --- B-10 in silver over white with SAC emblem (star ribbon?).
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - New Poll! - What should I do next?
Post by: GTX_Admin on November 11, 2013, 04:36:10 PM
B-51 in markings of any of the B-57/EE Canberra operator schemes
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - New Poll! - What should I do next?
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 11, 2013, 11:28:32 PM
A whiff --- B-10 in silver over white with SAC emblem (star ribbon?).
A B-10?  I hope that's a typo.  I didn't include an option for a brand new type (especially not one that's been done well before) because new types are very hard to do when you do them at the level of detail that Talos and I do.  Talos and I have another major one planned soon, but that won't be for a few months, probably.  We have enough profiles that we want to do for the existing aircraft anyway.  I just wanted to see if there were some major directions the forum would like to see us go.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - New Poll! - What should I do next?
Post by: Matt Wiser on November 12, 2013, 08:53:29 AM
The alternate F-14 has my vote. Especially a Phoenix-armed example, and aircraft belonging to the IIAF, USMC (four squadrons were originally tapped to be F-14 units, with VMFA-122 and VMFA-531 meant to be the first two), and a potential USAF buy for the NORAD mission.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - New Poll! - What should I do next?
Post by: elmayerle on November 12, 2013, 10:51:02 AM
The alternate F-14 has my vote. Especially a Phoenix-armed example, and aircraft belonging to the IIAF, USMC (four squadrons were originally tapped to be F-14 units, with VMFA-122 and VMFA-531 meant to be the first two), and a potential USAF buy for the NORAD mission.
One of the NORAD missions ones definitely has to be in full color 318th FS. markings with the compass rose on the vertical tail.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - New Poll! - What should I do next?
Post by: finsrin on November 12, 2013, 11:04:10 AM
The alternate F-14 has my vote. Especially a Phoenix-armed example, and aircraft belonging to the IIAF, USMC (four squadrons were originally tapped to be F-14 units, with VMFA-122 and VMFA-531 meant to be the first two), and a potential USAF buy for the NORAD mission.
One of the NORAD missions ones definitely has to be in full color 318th FS. markings with the compass rose on the vertical tail.
elmayerle is so right  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - New Poll! - What should I do next?
Post by: apophenia on November 12, 2013, 11:04:56 AM
I do like that Scottish roundel with the superimposed cross of St. Andrew  :)

As for the poll, I'm voting for the He 46!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - New Poll! - What should I do next?
Post by: Matt Wiser on November 12, 2013, 12:29:23 PM
And a second NORAD bird for the CA ANG's 144th FIW from Fresno. Now an F-15 unit....
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Scottish Skorpions - "The Lochness Monster"
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 12, 2013, 01:02:13 PM
Thanks for the feedback, everybody!  I'll definitely be referring to this thread when I get ready to do my next group of profiles.  I still have some to finish up for GBs, but they'll be next on the list after that!  Keep up the discussion, though!

How about another Frogfoot?  As per usual, click on the profile to see it at a larger size.  I've also submitted this to the Scottish Independence GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=3750.msg57574#msg57574).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Frogfoot/900px/ScottishSkorpion2.jpg~original) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Frogfoot/ScottishSkorpion2.jpg~original)

Here's another retro scheme trialed by No. 612 on their Skorpions.  This one comes from their postwar Vampires, the last aircraft flown by the unit.  The roundel bars are based on those worn by No. 612 at that time.  All the profiles and models I've seen showing this are of poor quality and/or contradictory.  I haven't seen a good photo of them, either.  I've asked someone more knowledgeable than myself on such things and he advised me that it was based on the Gordon tartan.  That sounded reasonable enough to me and fit the more reliable sources, so that's what I based them on, as well.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Frogfoot/Detail/ScottishSkorpion2_detail.jpg~original)

Weapons are the RBS-15, Maverick, and AMRAAM in a very anti-ship loadout.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Scottish Skorpions - "The Lochness Monster"
Post by: lauhof52 on November 12, 2013, 03:18:52 PM
Beautiful one - love the squadron roundel!

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Scottish Skorpions - "The Lochness Monster"
Post by: Empty Handed on November 13, 2013, 07:02:05 AM
Like the addition of the RBS-15!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Scottish Skorpions - "The Lochness Monster"
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 13, 2013, 12:10:30 PM
Thanks, guys!  I'm glad you like the roundel and missiles!  This one is more of a ground pounder.  As per usual, click on the profile to see it at a larger size.  I've also submitted this to the Scottish Independence GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=3750.msg57625#msg57625).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Frogfoot/900px/ScottishSkorpion3.jpg~original) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Frogfoot/ScottishSkorpion3.jpg~original)

Every good European air force needs a representative at a Tiger Meet and the brand new RScAF is no exception.  I call this scheme the "Tiger Shark".  I'll let you guess why.

(http://snowbrains.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/tiger-shark_1806626i.jpg)

The loadout is an air-to-ground strike loadout, representative of a Coalition participation mission.  It consists of LGBs, HARMs, JDAMs, and AMRAAMs.  The roundels are all low-vis, finally showing off the integrated Saltire when there is no flag for a fin flash.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Heinkel He 46G - Like Father, Like Son
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 13, 2013, 01:30:52 PM
It's been about two years since I touched this profile, so I can't blame anyone that doesn't remember this one, but--like the Prodigal Son--I've returned to the Heinkel He 46G to finish off a profile.  My father did the line art for this one a couple of years ago, then I did the lighting and shading of it.  Here's a link to the original post on it:

http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=144.msg6425#msg6425 (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=144.msg6425#msg6425)

Anyway, when I was looking at the various files on my hard drive that I needed to reopen and polish off, I found this one, basically 99% done.  I redid a lot of the weathering, but that was about all that I had to do.  Since it was in limbo for 2 years, I submitted this to the Clear Your Workbench GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=3773.0).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/GermanHe46G5.jpg~original) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/GermanHe46G5.jpg~original)

Finished in the standard scheme of the greens of 70/71 over blue 65 under surfaces with early style Balkenkreuz and the swastika applied across the rudder/fin hinge line, Heinkel He 46G, P2+HM of the 4.(H)/21 is seen here as it looked at Gross-Lassewitz on 1 September, 1939.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Heinkel He 46G - Like Father, Like Son
Post by: apophenia on November 14, 2013, 05:17:11 AM
Yes! Great to see your He 46 again  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Heinkel He 46G - Like Father, Like Son
Post by: Empty Handed on November 15, 2013, 08:17:51 PM
Very nice Tiger Shark effect on the Skorpion and I can only echo apophenia's comment re the He-46.  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Heinkel He 46G - Like Father, Like Son
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 16, 2013, 01:50:07 AM
Thanks, guys!  I'm glad you liked the camo and the return of the He 46, at least for a little bit.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Heinkel He 46G - Like Father, Like Son
Post by: GTX_Admin on November 16, 2013, 03:41:49 AM
I wonder...perhaps a variant in Desert Scheme - sort of a liaison hack?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Heinkel He 46G - Like Father, Like Son
Post by: apophenia on November 16, 2013, 03:58:44 AM
How about a Greek He 46 bought before the Henschel Hs 126?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Heinkel He 46G - Spanish Civil War
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 23, 2013, 12:50:11 PM
Hmm, I can look into those.  I was already thinking about the Greek one.

This is another that I had started, but didn't get very far with.  I just moved on to the next aircraft and didn't finish the profile.  Now that it's done, I've submitted it to the Clear Your Workbench GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=3773.0).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/SpanishHe46G1.jpg~original) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/SpanishHe46G1.jpg~original)

It depicts an aircraft operated by the Nationalist Air Force during the Spanish Civil War.  I know the St. Andrew's Cross on the tail looks off, but that's the way a number of aircraft looked in photos.  I think they painted it so that it looked roughly level when on the ground, but they clearly eyeballed it, whatever they did.  I hope you all like it!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Heinkel He 46G - Spanish Civil War
Post by: lauhof52 on November 23, 2013, 05:17:15 PM
Love that spanish one! :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Heinkel He 46G - Spanish Civil War
Post by: finsrin on November 23, 2013, 05:32:41 PM
Fine rendition  :)
Interesting that there is camo (excellent in profile) and they had high viz black & white markings  ???
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - RAF Handley Page Panther - Farnborough 1955
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 24, 2013, 01:28:20 PM
Here's another entry for the Clear Your Workbench GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=3819.0), a Handley Page Panther as seen at Farnborough in 1955.  I've used a lighter than usual on this one because the blue blended in perfectly with my standard background.  Click on the image to see it at 100%.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/B-51%20Panther/900px/RAFPanther2.jpg?t=1358572074) (http://fc00.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2013/327/e/4/raf_handley_page_panther_b_2___farnborough_1955_by_comradeloganov-d6vep4q.jpg)

These Handley Page production aircraft would differ substantially from the American B-51s.  First and foremost, they used Avon engines instead of the J47s used on the B-51A.  This provided the RAF Panthers with a substantial increase in available thrust.  Another major change was with the cockpit, as the RAF preferred to move both crew members under the canopy, as the USAF would also do in the B-51B.  Whereas the B-51B went with a tandem crew layout, however, the RAF displayed a clear preference for side-by-side seating from its experience with the Canberra, in particular.  This allowed for improved crew communication and allowed for a more efficient layout of the cockpit.  Finally, they added a substantial ECM suite to the top of the T-tail.

One of the first examples of this new British Panther variant was taken to the Farnborough airshow by Handley Page in 1955.  Just as they did at Farnborough two years earlier in 1953, Handley Page painted it to match its larger stablemate, the Handley Page Victor.  Both of the aircraft were finished in a gorgeous cerulean blue overall.  In fact, Handley Page managed to arrange for the two aircraft to have similar RAF serial numbers, WB775 for the Victor and XM775 for the Panther, respectively.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Little Girl" - Capt. Grossheusch
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 27, 2013, 02:54:01 PM
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Northrop-P-61F-Little-Girl-Capt-Grosshuesch-416186361).  I've also submitted this to the Beyond the Sprues GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=3829.0) and the Asiarama GB (http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,37354.new.html#new) over at the What If Forums.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/1080px/USAAFWidow3.jpg~original) (http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2013/330/a/a/northrop_p_61f___little_girl___capt__grosshuesch_by_comradeloganov-d6vsbg9.png)

As deliveries of the big new Northrop escort fighter increased to units of the Fifth Air Force, additional veteran pilots would transition to their new mounts.  One of these was Captain Leroy V. Grosshuesch, commanding officer of the 39th Fighter Squadron, 35th Fighter Group.  Grosshuesch had already scored seven victories flying Thunderbolts with 39th FS.  The 35th FG began operations from Okinawa with its P-61Fs in late June 1945, and on 12th August 1945, whilst flying this aircraft, he tallied his eighth and only P-61F victory, shooting down a Ki-84 Frank west of Bofu airfield, Honshu.  This was not, however, his first P-61.  His first was lost in an incident that would earn him the Silver Star.  On 30 July, Capt. Grosshuesch was credited with single-handedly sinking a Japanese destroyer off Goto Retto, near Kyushu. Grosshuesch's description of the action is below.

Quote
So, on this day four of us were on a "search and destroy" mission over Southern Japan. Normally, this was a great mission where we were free to search for targets of opportunity. However it was not a good day because we had a heavy overcast at 1000 to 1100 feet, so our ability to see ahead was quite limited.

We found some targets and attacked them, but wanted to find something more. I headed in a westerly direction and on the horizon saw an island, which was Goto Retto, a Japanese naval base, but we didn't know that. The mountain tops were up in the overcast, but there was a valley between two of the peaks which formed a "V" shaped opening through which we could see the water on the other side. As we approached, we were surprised to see a destroyer followed closely by another one sail across the space. Our P-61's had no bombs that day, just our four machine guns and four 20mm cannons, but we decided to make a strafing pass, not expecting that we could do much damage except to the personnel. Because of the narrow opening, we had to go in in trail. We took them by surprise. I gave a burst on the destroyer in view, and turned left because the harbor was not very wide and on the other side there was a range of mountains, their tops all in the cloud cover. It was a fateful turn! The other three turned right which was a stroke of luck because that let them exit the harbor. If all four of us had been inside the harbor, like I was, the destroyers would have surely shot down some of us.

As I turned to the left, I saw directly in front of me the naval base, and they started to unleash their anti-aircraft guns. I quickly turned right hugging the far side of the harbor, which was not far enough away to keep me out of the range of the two, now alerted, destroyers. I had seen ack-ack many times before, but nothing compared to this. The sky was filled with tracers and explosions, and they were all aimed at me. I don't know what was behind me, but it was awesome in front of me. They seemed to be shooting above me, so I couldn't pull up through all that flak into the clouds. I had to dive but there wasn't much space to do that. I decided if I was going to get "it" I would do as much damage as I could before they hit me. I dived and turned into the rear destroyer. I let go a long burst aimed at the water line of the ship. I must have hit the ammo magazine because the destroyer exploded. It was a terrific explosion--a huge, gigantic ball of fire which I had to fly through because I was too close to avoid it. As I burst out of the fireball I was heading for the "V" under the clouds, so I exited the way I had come in.

One of the guys in the flight said: "What the hell was that?" Another voice said: "I think Lee dove into the destroyer." By then, my heart had gotten out of my throat so I told them that I was OK, but damaged. We got together and returned to Okinawa. I had sunk the destroyer, but my poor P-61 was so riddled with shrapnel and debris from the explosion that it had to be scrapped. I don't know what happened to the other destroyer, but it must have been severely damaged by the huge explosion so close to it.

At one of the reunions, one of the crew chiefs said: "I don't know what all he did, but I know one thing, he is one of the luckiest guys in the whole world." I couldn't disagree with that.


Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Little Girl" - Capt. Grossheusch
Post by: Tophe on November 27, 2013, 07:51:34 PM
 :-* Thanks to have completed this P-61F (I voted for her)...
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Little Girl" - Capt. Grossheusch
Post by: GTX_Admin on November 28, 2013, 02:47:25 AM
Sweet.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Little Girl" - Capt. Grossheusch
Post by: lauhof52 on November 28, 2013, 03:20:18 PM
This is a very nice one! Logan. :) I also voted for the P-61.

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Little Girl" - Capt. Grossheusch
Post by: apophenia on November 29, 2013, 11:34:11 AM
It is beautifully done ... and I'm a sucker for rudder stripes  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Little Girl" - Capt. Grossheusch
Post by: Logan Hartke on November 29, 2013, 11:52:35 AM
Thanks, guys!  I thought this one turned out well.  It does look nice with those rudder stripes, too.  You might be seeing more P-61s with them.

Thanks again,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-187 Viking - Brazilian Viking
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 01, 2013, 02:42:33 PM
Here's one that's been in progress for over three and a half years.  Now that it's finished, I've submitted this to the Clear Your Workbench GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=3748.msg59151#msg59151).  I'm glad to have finally finished it.  As per usual with the Vikings, note that this is reduced to 33%.  Click on the profile to see it on Photobucket where you can click again and see it at 100%.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/BrazilianViking1.jpg~original) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/BrazilianViking1.jpg~original)

In 1938, the Aviação Militar do Exército Brasileiro (Brazilian Army Aviation) purchased 26 Vought V-187 Vikings which received the registration numbers 105-130.  The V-187-BR, known as 'Vikings', equipped the 1º Regimento de Aviação, based at Santa Cruz. On November 8, 1939, one of these aircraft, piloted by Maj. Clovis Monteiro Travassos and Sgt. Alfredo Amaral Barcelos (mechanic), conducted a direct flight between Fortaleza and Porto Alegre, covering a distance of 3,240 km over 11 hrs and 45 min.

With the creation of the Ministério da Aeronáutica in 1941, the aircraft were incorporated into the Força Aérea Brasileira (Brazilian Air Force).  During World War II, these aircraft were used in anti-submarine patrol missions.  On August 26, 1942, V-187-BR '122' of the 3º Regimento de Aviação in Canoas and manned by 1st Lt. Alfredo Gonçalves Corrêa (pilot) and Sgt. Carlos Zell (radioman and gunner), surprised a German submarine 50 miles from Araranguá, along the Paraná coast.  The attack took place at 1400 hrs and the Viking was so low to the water when it dropped its payload that the shrapnel from the explosion damaged the cowling and exhaust manifold of the V-187-BR, forcing the crew to land at the emergency landing strip at Osório.  On the 28th of the same month, V-187-BR '107', piloted by Capt. Manuel Rogério de Souza Coelho, attacked a submarine near Iguape, although without acheiving any visible damage to the enemy vessel.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-187 Viking - Brazilian Viking
Post by: lauhof52 on December 01, 2013, 05:11:21 PM
This one is really beautiful, Logan! 8)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-187 Viking - Brazilian Viking
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 01, 2013, 10:42:43 PM
Thanks, lauhof!  I'm happy about how it turned out!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-187 Viking - Brazilian Viking
Post by: Geist on December 03, 2013, 05:31:27 AM
Great work and info. :)
This fact is entirely new for me, despite of being part of my country history.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-187 Viking - Brazilian Viking
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 03, 2013, 05:40:10 AM
Thanks!  Good to hear it meets Brazilian approval!  The history is, obviously, a modification of the real history of the Vultee V-11 GB2.  The site below has a good deal of history on it.

http://www.rudnei.cunha.nom.br/FAB/index.html (http://www.rudnei.cunha.nom.br/FAB/index.html)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Detail/jacareacute.jpg~original)

(http://aviarmor.net/aww2/_photo_aircraft/f_ussr/bsh-1/v11gb_001.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-187 Viking - Brazilian Viking
Post by: Geist on December 06, 2013, 08:11:20 AM
Thanks for the link.
I know the owner of the site. It sounds ridiculous, but I didn't know he had it.
Anyway, keep posting your profiles. They're great.
Regards
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-187 Viking - Brazilian Viking
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 06, 2013, 09:12:42 AM
Thanks, Geist!  I'm not surprised you know him.  I imagine the online Brazilian historic aviation enthusiast community is small enough that you bump into each other every now and again.

By the way, as I pointed out, I've been planning this profile for years but kept getting distracted.  Fortunately, I saved the image of the very dapper caiman astride the bomb back when I initially looked at doing the profile.  Since then, however, I could not find the darn thing online for the life of me.  Do you or Rudnei happen to know who the original artist was for the graphic?  I'd love to give credit to the appropriate person.  Feel free to show the Viking to Rudnei and thank him for his site which I took advantage of in doing my research for this profile.

I hope he's able to update the site soon, especially the navigation.  The 800x600 format is beginning to show its age at this point.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-1 Wolfpack
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 06, 2013, 03:49:29 PM
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Vought-V-507-F-14A-Vagabond-VF-1-Wolfpack-418030834).  It's another Vought V-507, LTV's submission to the VFX competition actually won by the Grumman Tomcat.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/1080px/USNVagabond2.jpg~original) (http://fc04.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2013/339/6/7/vought_v_507_f_14a_vagabond___vf_1_wolfpack_by_comradeloganov-d6wvunm.png)

Quote
VF-1, "Wolfpack" was re-established on October 14, 1972 at NAS Miramar, at the same time as VF-2, these units were the first F-14 fighter squadrons. VF-1 received the first F-14As on July 1, 1973. The squadron's insignia was a red wolf’s head designed by Grumman Commercial Artist, George M. Kehew who himself is a WWII combat veteran. The Squadron Insignia is registered in the Library of Congress.

Under the command of Cdr. George M. Furlong, Jr.--better known as "Skip"--VF's first cruise came in September 1974 onboard Enterprise. The end of the cruise saw the Vagabond's combat debut, as VF-1 and VF-2 flew cover over Saigon for evacuation of US personnel in April 1975 as part of Operation Frequent Wind.  Skip Furlong, the pilot of the aircraft depicted in this profile, would go on to become a rear admiral after commanding VF-1.  He had a long and distinguished flying career serving as the F-14 Program Manager, the first F-14 CAG, the first S-3 CAG, and the last fleet pilot to check out in the Vought F-8 Crusader.

It was, perhaps, the radar intercept officer of this aircraft, however, that would go on to be more famous than the pilot.  Lieutenant (junior grade) Dale Gardner was involved in the initial F-14 developmental test and evaluation before his cruise with VF-1 on the USS Enterprise in 1974.  In 1978 he was selected as an Astronaut Candidate by NASA and would go on to fly on the Space Shuttle Challenger in mission STS-8 in 1983.  He later flew on the Discovery's second mission, STS-51-A.  This mission launched on November 8, 1984, Gardner's 36th birthday.  During STS-51-A, Gardner completed two space walks totaling 12 hours and participated in the recovery of two wayward satellites.  During his NASA career, he would spend over 14 days in space and make 225 orbits of the Earth.


First of all, I wanted to go roughly chronologically now that I got the requisite VF-84 bird out of the way.  VF-1 was the perfect starting point.  Next, I needed to pick the actual aircraft to represent.  The CAG bird was a good one, but finding the details on the crew was a little tougher.  There's a great profile of the plane I patterned this aircraft off of in this book and it even has enough fidelity to make out the names of the crew under the cockpit.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51nzoxqxaLL.jpg)
http://www.amazon.com/Tomcat-Grumman-F-14-Aircraft-Specials/dp/0897475364 (http://www.amazon.com/Tomcat-Grumman-F-14-Aircraft-Specials/dp/0897475364)

"CDR SKIP FURLONG" and "LTJG BILL GARNDER"

First of all, I thought that "Garnder" was a misspelling and should be "Gardner".  Some quick searches reinforced that, but I still couldn't find a "Bill Gardner" associated with Skip Furlong.  Thankfully, I had another (much older) book I was using as a source:

(http://www.aeroflight.co.uk/biblio/series/aero/aero25.jpg)
http://www.amazon.com/Grumman-F-14-Tomcat-Aero-25/dp/0816805903/ (http://www.amazon.com/Grumman-F-14-Tomcat-Aero-25/dp/0816805903/)

Although 32 years older than the book I was using for the profile and even more than a decade older than me, it was the better source in this case.  On one of the last pages, it has a picture of the right side of this very aircraft in good enough quality that you can make out the name.  LTJG DALE GARDNER.  Now I could write the story for it and make it pretty interesting and give it the personal touch.

I also wanted to show an aircraft in the "clean" configuration to show off the fine lines.  Fortunately, most of the VF-1 Tomcats from that first cruise were also clean.  I removed the Sidewinder pylons, too, since that was common with the F-8 Crusader when they were not in use.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-1 Wolfpack
Post by: GTX_Admin on December 07, 2013, 03:24:16 AM
Nice work as per usual :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-1 Wolfpack
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 07, 2013, 04:56:27 AM
Thanks, Greg.

Sorry, guys, when I posted this at 2:49 AM in the morning, I had the wrong link to the full size image, so you couldn't see the detail like the names under the cockpit, for example.  I've since fixed that link.

Next up?  Probably an He 100 of some form.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-1 Wolfpack
Post by: GTX_Admin on December 07, 2013, 04:58:18 AM
Probably an He 100 of some form.


I vote Israeli post war...
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-1 Wolfpack
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 07, 2013, 05:21:00 AM
Eventually, but that one won't be anytime soon.  Sticking with the DB 601 for the moment.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-1 Wolfpack
Post by: GTX_Admin on December 07, 2013, 05:29:22 AM
Eventually, but that one won't be anytime soon.  Sticking with the DB 601 for the moment.

Cheers,

Logan

No reason an Israeli one can't be DB601 powered... ;)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-1 Wolfpack
Post by: elmayerle on December 07, 2013, 10:12:42 AM
Eventually, but that one won't be anytime soon.  Sticking with the DB 601 for the moment.
Eventually, perhaps, a Spanish-built, Merlin-powered example, or perhaps Griffon-powered.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-1 Wolfpack
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 07, 2013, 10:14:09 AM
Yeah, Talos and I definitely have ideas, but it takes time to do them.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-1 Wolfpack
Post by: Matt Wiser on December 07, 2013, 10:20:12 AM
VF-1 Vagabond? Love it!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-1 Wolfpack
Post by: Talos on December 07, 2013, 10:35:37 AM
Eventually, but that one won't be anytime soon.  Sticking with the DB 601 for the moment.
Eventually, perhaps, a Spanish-built, Merlin-powered example, or perhaps Griffon-powered.

I already have the Buchon lineart finished and posted in my thread. We are holding off on doing the profile until we get to that period.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-1 Wolfpack
Post by: elmayerle on December 07, 2013, 11:04:24 AM
For some reason, I keep seeing an air-racing Buchon with a Griffon driving contra-props and an even more streamlined canopy.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-1 Wolfpack
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 07, 2013, 11:21:30 AM
This should hold you over:

'The Jägermeister' [US National Air Races, ex Heinkel He-100D Unlimited Class]
 (http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,37479.0.html)

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3683/9461883849_7bc621bc4c_c.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-1 Wolfpack
Post by: Talos on December 07, 2013, 11:35:36 AM
Since I'm finally back home and posting on a real computer and not a phone, here are the two Merlin-powered He 100 Buchon drawings I did. The first one is the normal version we'll likely be doing, the second is a bubbletop I did for fun since I had already done the bubble canopy for a normal He 100. I just transferred it over to see how it would look.

(http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/ee312/Talos5/He%20100/th_He100Buchon.jpg) (http://s229.photobucket.com/user/Talos5/media/He%20100/He100Buchon.jpg.html)
(http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/ee312/Talos5/He%20100/th_He100Buchonbubblecanopy.jpg) (http://s229.photobucket.com/user/Talos5/media/He%20100/He100Buchonbubblecanopy.jpg.html)

Thumbnails, of course. Click for the full-sized ones.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-1 Wolfpack
Post by: GTX_Admin on December 07, 2013, 11:52:42 AM
This should hold you over:

'The Jägermeister' [US National Air Races, ex Heinkel He-100D Unlimited Class]
 ([url]http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,37479.0.html[/url])

([url]http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3683/9461883849_7bc621bc4c_c.jpg[/url])

Cheers,

Logan


Sweet! :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought V-507 Vagabond - VF-1 Wolfpack
Post by: JP Vieira on December 07, 2013, 09:08:30 PM
Very good
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Willi Fronhöfer's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 10, 2013, 03:54:09 AM
Thanks for the kind words, everyone!  As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Willi-Fronhoefer-s-Heinkel-He-100D-2-418779288).  I've also submitted this to the Clear Your Workbench GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=3873.0).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/GermanHe100D4.jpg~original) (http://fc01.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2013/343/c/c/willi_fronhoefer_s_heinkel_he_100d_2_by_comradeloganov-d6xbw60.png)

Full backstory below:

Quote
On 31 August, JG 26 mounted various missions throughout the day and claimed 22 victories for the loss of five aircraft and pilots, the heaviest loss of pilots in a single day during the whole of the Battle of Britain. During a late afternoon mission the entire Geschwader took off to rendezvous with KG 76, which was to attack the RAF aerodrome at Hornchurch. As soon as the aircraft of Stab III./JG 26 crossed the coast, they were attacked by RAF fighters and Oblt. Wilhelm Fronhöfer of 9./JG 26 was one of three pilots shot down.  His aircraft, 'Yellow 10' was shot down by a Spitfire piloted by P/O C.F. Gray of RAF No. 54 Squadron. Fronhöfer made a force landing at Jubilee Hill Farm, Ulcombe, Sussex, England. He was uninjured. Fronhöfer had three kills to his credit at the time he was shot down. One known victory, his 1st, a Mureaux at Löwen on 15 May, 1940. His 2nd, a Spitfire I west of Dunkirk, 29 May, 1940. His 3rd, a Hurricane of RAF No. 141 Sq. at Folkestone on 15 August, 1940.

With an upper scheme of 70/71 Fronhöfer He 100D-2, WrNr 1184, was finished in the commonly seen III./JG 26 high demarcation camouflage style with no discernible mottling on the sides of the fuselage, fin or rudder. In keeping with the other aircraft of this Gruppe, the Balkenkreuz, Gruppe bar and aircraft number were smaller than usually seen. The 9. Staffel Hollenhund emblem and JG 26 'Schlageter' shield were carried on both sides of the fuselage beneath the cockpit. It is understood that the tip of the spinner was a lighter green than the remainder. The Werk Nummer on the fin is applied on a dark green rectangular background indicating that this aircraft was originally finished in a low-demarcation 70/71 camouflage scheme.


Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Willi Fronhöfer's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: GTX_Admin on December 10, 2013, 04:12:45 AM
Subtle - I like! :D
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Willi Fronhöfer's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: lauhof52 on December 10, 2013, 04:30:33 AM
Nice story with a fine airplane-drawing! :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Willi Fronhöfer's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 10, 2013, 05:04:56 AM
Thanks, guys!  The Bf 109 schemes are actually somewhat tough to translate to the He 100 since their shape are almost flipped.  The Bf 109 is basically a straight line at the top with the bottom curving up to meet it.  The He 100 is basically a straight line on the bottom with the top of the plane curving down to meet that line.  As a result, there's usually a significant visual difference between the same scheme on the two airplanes.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Willi Fronhöfer's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 10, 2013, 01:31:46 PM
There, I think I've met all the poll options now, so I hope there's something there for everyone.  Will a moderator remove the poll from this thread, now?  I couldn't see a way that I could do it myself.  Thanks in advance!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - RAF Handley Page Panther - Falklands 1982
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 11, 2013, 03:25:31 PM
This one should be familiar, but it was never truly finished.  This is a Handley Page Panther as a Black Buck bomber from 1982.  As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://www.deviantart.com/art/RAF-Handley-Page-Panther-B-I-4-Falklands-1982-419091985).  I've also submitted this to the Clear Your Workbench GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=3819.msg59987#msg59987).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/B-51%20Panther/900px/RAFPanther3b.jpg~original) (http://fc07.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2013/344/7/3/raf_handley_page_panther_b_i__4___falklands_1982_by_comradeloganov-d6xilg1.jpg)

Quote
The weather over the Falkland Islands on 3 June 1982 was poor, and the only offensive air action was an air strike by Panther B(I).4 XM267.  Flown by Flt Lt Steve Griggs and his No 14 Sqn crew, 'Black Buck 6' carried four Texas Instruments AGM-45A Shrike anti-radar missiles to use against the radars around Port Stanley that were directing air raids on the Task Force, targeting Exocet attacks, warning Argentine aircraft of Sea Harrier patrols and gun-laying for AAA batteries. Griggs approached the target from the northeast at low altitude, before popping up to 16,000 ft to begin his attack. But experience from previous 'Black Buck' raids had taught the Argentine radar operators what to expect from a bomber behaving in this way. 'As we got to about nine miles from Port Stanley', recalled Griggs, 'the radars started to switch off, and as we went past and out to sea again, they came on. We went round and round repeating that process for about 40 minutes. Then, on the final run before we had to go home, I decided to go into a descent towards Port Stanley airfield to tempt them into switching on the radars to have ago at us'. Griggs eased back the three throttles and XM267 started to descend. 'We got down to about 10,000 ft, heading towards Sapper Hill, and sure enough one of their radars came on. Then the guns started firing at us. I saw flashes in the sky as four shells burst below me and to the right'. Meanwhile, Navigator Flt Lt Alistair Inverarity locked on two Shrikes and launched them one after the other at the radar. As Griggs pulled the Panther up so as to avoid going too low, he saw an explosive flash light up the mist just above the ground. One of the missiles had impacted close to a Skyguard fire control radar, where it caused damage and killed four of the operating crew - an officer, a sergeant and two soldiers.

XM267 flew 'Black Bucks 5' and '6', firing Shrike anti-radar missiles carried on twin adapters against Argentine radar units. XM267 carried and fired two Shrikes during 'Black Buck 5', and carried four for 'Black Buck 6', firing two 'in anger'. The aircraft is seen here as it appeared post-war, with mission markings consisting of Argentine flags and missile silhouettes and a Brazilian flag, and carrying four Shrike missiles on the fuselage pylons. The Brazilian flag marked the aircraft's unscheduled visit to Rio de Janeiro after 'Black Buck 6', when its refueling probe tip broke as it attempted to refuel.


Obviously, this is a "what if" aircraft in the markings of a Black Buck Vulcan from the Falklands.  The text above is likewise modified from the actual incident.  Some of you may recognize the names Steve Griggs and Alistair Inverarity.  They were involved in another live fire incident from 1982.  That incident was not as auspicious as McDougall and Trevaskus', however.

The profile, when submitted the first time was actually about 85% done.  Talos and I finally got around to finishing it this time.  I'd been waiting for the IFR probe from him before, but life got in the way, so I just submitted it 'as is'.  Now, though, it has the probe as originally intended.  I also added some markings, gave it a full backstory, and fixed some of the image text.  I hope you all like this one a bit more!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - RAF Handley Page Panther - Falklands 1982
Post by: lauhof52 on December 11, 2013, 06:07:03 PM
As always a nice story and Talos and you did a great job!

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Romanian Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 13, 2013, 01:57:58 PM
Thanks, Paul!  As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Romanian-Heinkel-He-100D-2-419479570).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/RomanianHe100D1.jpg~original) (http://fc07.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2013/346/f/b/romanian_heinkel_he_100d_2_by_comradeloganov-d6xqwia.png)

In April of 1939, as a result of a European tour by Charles II, King of Romania, a wide range of modern military equipment, including aircraft, was acquired from France, the United Kingdom and, above all, Germany.  The Third Reich made every substantial effort to attract Romania, a country rich in oil and wheat, to its side by promising the preferred Messerschmitt Bf 109s for future delivery, and by offering twenty-four of the less advanced Heinkel He 112 in the interim.  The shapely Heinkel fighter was no mystery to the Aeronautica Regală Română (ARR, Royal Romanian Aeronautics) since a prototype had been extensively tested during late 1938 by pilots of the ARR's Escadrila de experiente (Experimental Squadron) based at Pipera-Bucharest airfield.

Unfortunately for Romania, the Heinkel He 100 had recently been selected by RLM for operational service and--as a result--the He 112 was no longer in production.  In a visit to the Heinkel plant, however, the Romanian delegation was allowed to test fly the Heinkel He 100 V8 prototype.  Understandably, they were smitten.  Unable to provide the promised He 112s, the RLM agreed to instead deliver the Bf 109s sooner.  Romania was no longer interested in the Bf 109, though, they only wanted the He 100.  This put Germany in a tough position.  The Heinkel He 100 was the fastest fighter in the world and the Luftwaffe didn't want to part with any of its newest fighters.  Despite the RLM's objections, the Reich Foreign Ministry pushed the sale of the He 100 through, in an effort to curry favor with the strategically important Romanians.  Aircraft originally intended for the Luftwaffe were diverted to meet the Romanian order.

A group of Romanian pilots soon arrived in Germany to begin their transition training on the new machine.  The Heinkel fighter represented a completely new aircraft type with unique handling techniques.  They were unprepared for flight in a high-speed, all metal monoplane, with retractable undercarriage and enclosed cockpit.  After completion of the training program at the Heinkel Flugzeugwerke, the first batch of Romanian pilots proudly boarded their new fighters returned home.  Immediately after their arrival, the Heinkels were promptly painted with Romanian Red-Yellow-Blue roundels and hasitly impressed into service.  In this way, the ARR high command attempted to upgrade the quality of Romania's fighter force, which left much to be desired.

A new fighter group was formed within the 1st Fighter Fleet, the front-line Romanian fighter force.  Grupul 5 vânătoare (5th Fighter Group), made up of Escadrila 51 and Escadrila 52 (51st and 52nd Squadrons), was re-equipped with the newly arrived He 100Ds.  The 5th Fighter Group's responsibility was the defense of the capital.  Using Nardi FN.305 monoplane trainers, the handful of assigned pilots began their transition from the old Polish-made PZL P.11 fighters to the new German aircraft.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Romanian Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: GTX_Admin on December 14, 2013, 03:15:28 AM
(http://digigum.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/comment-friday-damn.jpg)

And with sound ;):

DAAAMMMMMMMMMMMN!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=95SYdjRVCR0#)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Romanian Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: lauhof52 on December 14, 2013, 04:34:24 PM
 :) :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Romanian Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: GTX_Admin on December 15, 2013, 02:35:05 AM
How about some captured He100s?  Say one in RAF captured markings and one in Soviet...
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Romanian Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: perttime on December 15, 2013, 02:42:57 AM
I think there was a mention of later model He 100, at some point somewhere. Can we expect to see a He 100 E, F, G or H, later on?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Romanian Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 15, 2013, 04:15:52 AM
Greg, this profile (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?action=post;msg=38376;topic=144.330) basically had RAF markings.  That should have fit the bill.

http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?action=post;msg=38376;topic=144.330 (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?action=post;msg=38376;topic=144.330)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/AustralianHe100D1.jpg) (http://fc02.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2013/043/e/5/gibbes__australian_heinkel_he_100d_4_trop_raaf_by_comradeloganov-d5urpdk.png)

Captured Soviet and later RAF ones are eventually planned.  As for later He 100 variants, yes, at least an -F is planned with the DB605.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Romanian Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: GTX_Admin on December 15, 2013, 04:27:55 AM
Doh!!  Forgot that one. :-[
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Hungarian Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 15, 2013, 02:10:10 PM
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Hungarian-Heinkel-He-100D-2-419899121).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/HungarianHe100D1.jpg~original) (http://fc01.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2013/348/2/8/hungarian_heinkel_he_100d_2_by_comradeloganov-d6xzw8h.png)

In June of 1938, a Hungarian "civilian" delegation visited the Heinkel Flugzeugwerke factory.  On this occasion, Örnagy (Major) Barkász and two other pilots were allowed to fly the He 112 V9.  It was during this visit that they first saw the He 100, though they were not permitted to fly it at this time.  The delegation formed a highly favorable impression of the He 112 and their reports prompted the Hungarian Hadügyminisztérium (Ministry of War Affairs) to place an order for thirty-six He 112Bs in late September of 1938.  At that time, however, there were no aircraft ready for delivery.  Japan and Spain were on the waiting list, and all aircraft were on back order.  All pleas for priority consideration by the Hungarians proved futile, the RLM would not approve the He 112s for quick delivery.  The Germans deliberately delayed the fulfillment of the order using it as political extortion against the Magyars and their rivals, the Romanians.  On 14 January 1939, Major Barkász pressed once more for the delivery of the thirty-six He 112s on order, but again his efforts proved futile.  In fact, the order was impossible to fill from the moment the order was placed.  The He 112 line was already shutting down, and Heinkel was switching over to production of the He 100 to meet Luftwaffe orders.  All extant orders for the He 112 would either be replaced by another type or left unfilled.  For the Hungarians, it would be a combination of the two, with an emphasis on the latter.

Another Hungarian delegation led by Major Barkász arrived at Heinkel works on 10 March 1939 to inquire about the status of their He 112 order.  They soon determined that it would never be completed as there we no longer any He 112s being produced, but they were permitted to test fly one of the He 100s at this time.  The Hadügyminisztérium requested their order of He 112s be switched for He 100s, but also realized that this order could be delayed indefinitely as well, so decided to inquire about license production of the He 100.  In May of 1939, the license documents were handed over to the Hungarians.  Only three He 100D-2s of the thirty-six ordered were delivered.  These fighters received the typical Hungarian camouflage scheme of Dark Green, Dark Brown, Terra Cotta uppersurfaces and over German Light Gray undersurfaces.  They were coded V.301, V.302, and V.303 (V for vadász, or fighter) and the forward pointed triangular chevron national marking was applied to the wings and tail.  All three Heinkels were assigned to the Repülö Kísérleti Intézet, where they participated in comparison tests against various aircraft in MKHL service.  They were evaluated against the new Reggiane Re-2000 Héja I, which was to become the standard fighter of the Hungarian air force during the early stages of the war.  The Commander-in-Chief of the MKHL, Ezredes (Colonel) László Háry, a veteran pilot of the First World War, recommended the Heinkel He 100 as the standard Hungarian fighter.

Note: The propeller is camouflaged.  No, seriously, the Hungarians actually applied the complex three-color camouflage to the propellers of two of the He 112s they actually operated.  Crazy.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Hungarian Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: lauhof52 on December 15, 2013, 03:15:27 PM
Love that camo Logan! Nice job! :)

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Hungarian Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: elmayerle on December 16, 2013, 01:14:23 AM
With that production licnese, particularly if it also includes license-rights to product the DB601, I could see the Hungarians beating the Italians in installing a DB601 in an Re.2000 airframe to develop an equivalent of the Re.2001 (not as good as the He.100, but likely to be more available).
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Hungarian Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 16, 2013, 02:36:19 PM
Thanks, guys.  Elmayerle, that's possible, but I think if they'd had more DB601s, I think they'd have preferred to slap it on the He 112 or He 100 over the Reggianes.  That having been said, there will be more Hungarian He 100s.

I'm working on another USAAF P-61F, by the way.  It should be finished tomorrow, but I'll probably need another day to do the write-up/backstory.  So, plan for Wednesday on that one.  I have to say, one of the things that I love about profiling USAAF aircraft is no underwing roundel to profile!  Those things suck, honestly.  The USAAF doesn't mess with those under the left wing and I love them for that.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Hungarian Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: elmayerle on December 17, 2013, 03:08:14 AM
Hmm, He112's with DB601's would be something a bit different.  Looking forward to seeing more P-61F's and He100's.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Putt Putt Maru" - Col. MacDonald
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 17, 2013, 01:29:04 PM
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Northrop-P-61F-Putt-Putt-Maru-Col-MacDonald-420316037).  I've also submitted this to the Asiarama GB (http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,37354.msg621917.html#msg621917) over at the What If Forums.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/1080px/USAAFWidow4.jpg~original) (http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2013/350/6/a/northrop_p_61f___putt_putt_maru___col__macdonald_by_comradeloganov-d6y8txh.png)

Another Fifth Air Force ace to fly the P-61F long range escort fighter variant of the Black Widow was Col. Charles H. MacDonald, commanding officer of the 475th Fighter Group.  Each of ‘Mac' MacDonald’s assigned Lightnings were named PUTT PUTT MARU, and he continued this tradition when he converted to the P-61F.  The fifth PUTT PUTT MARU (P-61F-1-NO 43-14024) has Col. MacDonald’s 27 victory flags painted under the canopy.  This is what Col. MacDonald wrote about long-range combat operations in the Pacific after transitioning to the new P-61F Widows.

Quote
Up to the present operation, our missions were averaging around seven hours of flying.  For these missions it is necessary for each pilot to know, unequivocally, the maximum performance of his aeroplane.  It is more important for a fighter pilot in the SWPA to know how to get the most distance and the most time from his gasoline than to know the minimum speed from which he can do an Immelman.  Of course, a good fighter pilot should know everything, far from the least of which is how to shoot.  Never fire long bursts.  This procedure not only wastes ammunition, but heats the guns to the point where the bullets lose speed and direction.  With the new aeroplanes our enemy is developing, and the psychological effect of fighting closer to his home land, I do not doubt that we will have to revise our opinions and our tactics.



Here's a detail shot of the nose art on this profile.  I have to admit, I am quite proud of how the markings on this aircraft turned out.  I had to do a lot custom work to get those to turn out alright, more than I expected.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/Detail/USAAFWidow4.jpg~original) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/Detail/USAAFWidow4.jpg~original)

I hope you all like it!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Putt Putt Maru" - Col. MacDonald
Post by: lauhof52 on December 17, 2013, 06:02:08 PM
Of course I really like it. Very nice detail work!

regards
lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Putt Putt Maru" - Col. MacDonald
Post by: elmayerle on December 18, 2013, 11:56:06 AM
Damn, that's a gorgeous piece of work.  Bravo!!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Putt Putt Maru" - Col. MacDonald
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 18, 2013, 12:30:54 PM
Thanks guys!  I think this variant is really coming alive in all the various service schemes.  You might also notice that it's got the larger long-range tanks normally fitted to the P-61.  With those, this thing would have had an insane range from Okinawa, likely over almost all of Japan.

Not sure what I'll be doing next, likely a German He 100 on the Russian Front in 1942.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Putt Putt Maru" - Col. MacDonald
Post by: taiidantomcat on December 19, 2013, 04:27:36 AM
Brilliant work!!  :-*

You know what might look really good are some of those really vibrant P-51 long range escort schemes
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop P-61F - "Putt Putt Maru" - Col. MacDonald
Post by: Logan Hartke on December 19, 2013, 07:23:24 AM
That's what the Grossheusch plane (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=144.msg58820#msg58820) was.  The markings are entirely from his P-51D.  In fact, the tanks I did for this profile were the 110 gallon long-range Mustang tanks that were used in the Pacific, too.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/900px/USAAFWidow3.jpg~original) (http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2013/330/a/a/northrop_p_61f___little_girl___capt__grosshuesch_by_comradeloganov-d6vsbg9.png)

http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=144.msg58820#msg58820 (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=144.msg58820#msg58820)

(http://cobraintheclouds.com/images/500_Gross_Mustang5.jpg)

The blue on the spinner and on the engine come from it, as do the tail stripes and two command stripes.  I don't know if they'd have done them on the booms AND the center fuselage, but I did.  I originally was copying the black bars, too, but something I had read was nagging at me, so I did some more research to jog my memory.  So, quick history lesson here.  The Fifth Air Force in the Philippines painted black stripes on the wings and fuselage of their single-engined fighters in that theater.  This was to prevent their pilots from mistaking other US aircraft for Japanese aircraft.  Many units carried this practice over to Okinawa and the 35th FG did this with their P-51s.  The Fifth Air Force did NOT, however, do this with the P-38 Lightning.  Why not?  Well, how many Japanese fighters look like the P-38?  Exactly.  Well, the same would have held true for the P-61F, so I deleted them from the final profile.  They may yet make an appearance, however.  The next scheme might come from a P-47N when I get around to it eventually.  Maybe a P-51D.  We'll see.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Hannes Trautlof's Heinkel He 100D-4
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 27, 2014, 01:12:14 PM
Here's another He 100 profile that I just finished.  As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Hannes-Trautlof-s-Heinkel-He-100D-4-436970508).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/GermanHe100D6.jpg~original) (http://fc03.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2014/057/6/9/hannes_trautlof_s_heinkel_he_100d_4_by_comradeloganov-d785slo.png)

Full backstory below:

Quote
When Hannes Trautloft passed away on January 12, 1996, Germany lost "one of the great educators in the fighter arm," in the words of historian Ernst Obermaier.  Trautloft earned great respect for his able command of JG 54 from August 1940 to July 1943.  His personal insignia, the "Green heart of Germany" (Thuringia region) was adopted by the entire JG 54, which became famous as Jagdgeschwader Grünherz.  He achieved eight victories during the Battle of Britain.  Following his nineteenth and twentieth victories on July 24, 1941—two Soviet SB bombers near Soltsy, USSR—Major Trautloft was awarded with the Knight's Cross.  Under Trautloft's command, JG 54 was credited with 1,200 victories on the Eastern Front through January 2, 1942.  Geschwaderkommodore Trautloft scored his personal fortieth victory—against a Pe-2—on May 9, 1942.  On July 6, 1943, Trautloft's personal friend, General der Jagdflieger Galland, appointed him inspector of the Fighter Air Arm on the Eastern Front.  Trautloft ended the war with a total of 53 victories (plus four in the Spanish Civil War) on 560 combat sorties.


Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Hannes Trautlof's Heinkel He 100D-4
Post by: Matt Wiser on February 28, 2014, 10:56:19 AM
Nice work, Logan! What's next?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Hannes Trautlof's Heinkel He 100D-4
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 01, 2014, 01:35:17 AM
Hmm, not sure.  Was there something in particular that you really wanted to see?

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Hannes Trautlof's Heinkel He 100D-4
Post by: Matt Wiser on March 01, 2014, 11:56:26 AM
How about that alternate F-14 again? IIAF or the what-if NORAD bird....may I suggest the 144th FIW at Fresno in the same scheme as their F-106s?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Hannes Trautlof's Heinkel He 100D-4
Post by: apophenia on March 01, 2014, 12:09:44 PM
Love the Grünherz He-100  :-*  Gorgeous work as always Logan!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Hannes Trautlof's Heinkel He 100D-4
Post by: Geist on March 02, 2014, 10:50:13 PM
Really good! Beautiful.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Iranian Vought V-507 Vagabond
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 08, 2014, 10:33:33 AM
Finally got the chance to do an Iranian one.  It'll get missiles after the Revolution.  As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Vought-V-507-F-14A-Vagabond-Iran-438918283).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/1080px/IranianVagabond1.jpg~original) (http://fc08.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/066/4/f/vought_v_507_f_14a_vagabond___iran_by_comradeloganov-d79bjij.png)

Iran ordered a total of 80 Vought F-14A Vagabonds in two batches, one of 30 and another of 50 aircraft, in early 1974. The first F-14 was delivered to the Imperial Iranian Air Force (IIAF) in January 1976, and the first two units were fully operational by the summer of 1977, by when the training of additional crews was advancing at a very high pace.

By late 1978, the 80th F-14 produced to Iran was built as well; instead of being delivered, however, the aircraft was kept in the USA to be used as test-rig for installation of the USAF-style "boom-and-receptacle" in-flight refueling system. Meanwhile, over 120 Iranian pilots and 80 RIOs were qualified for the Vagabond, and an additional group was about to finish their training.

Since 1977 the IIAF F-14s were engaged in a series of tests, which put the plane and its weapons system to the extremes, and eventually ended by several spectacular test-firings of AIM-54s, two of which might have scored unofficial world-records for the range, speed, and the height reached by the missiles in flight. In October 1978 also two IIAF F-14As intercepted a high and fast-flying Soviet MiG-25 over the Caspian sea, forcing it to abort a recce run over Iran, and in turn ending similar Soviet operations over the country.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Iranian Vought V-507 Vagabond
Post by: Matt Wiser on March 08, 2014, 10:41:08 AM
Thanks!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Iranian Vought V-507 Vagabond
Post by: Talos on March 08, 2014, 11:28:00 AM
That one came out really nice, Logan. The camo, just like on the IIRAF F-14s, looks so weird after being used to gull grey.  ;D
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Iranian Vought V-507 Vagabond
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 08, 2014, 11:35:28 AM
Though I'll bet that even you, Talos, didn't notice the removal of the IRST under the nose on the Iranian F-14.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Iranian Vought V-507 Vagabond
Post by: GTX_Admin on March 09, 2014, 02:30:29 AM
 :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Iranian Vought V-507 Vagabond
Post by: Matt Wiser on March 09, 2014, 02:22:40 PM
On their real F-14s, the IIAF never installed the IRST. They were waiting for the TCS system to become available, but the Revolution ensured they would never get it, along with swapping out the TF-30 engine for the GE F110, and 70 more F-14s.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Iranian Vought V-507 Vagabond
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 09, 2014, 02:38:33 PM
Indeed.  And that's why I omitted it on this one, too.  They were also looking to convert them to boom style refueling as I understood it, too (that's what happened to the 80th F-14A of the initial order.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Iranian Vought V-507 Vagabond
Post by: GTX_Admin on March 09, 2014, 04:15:30 PM
They were also looking to convert them to boom style refueling as I understood it, too (that's what happened to the 80th F-14A of the initial order.

That's the first I have heard of that.  Do you have any details?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Iranian Vought V-507 Vagabond
Post by: finsrin on March 09, 2014, 05:59:52 PM
Schemes of P-61 and He-100 are tops :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Iranian Vought V-507 Vagabond
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 09, 2014, 09:23:43 PM
That's the first I have heard of that.  Do you have any details?


ACIG (http://www.acig.org/artman/publish/article_212.shtml) and the Osprey (http://books.google.com/books?id=MCzk0cARvjAC&lpg=PA21&ots=LphvWDXm-T&dq=%22f-14a%22%20iran%20boom%2080th&pg=PA21#v=onepage&q=%22f-14a%22%20iran%20boom%2080th&f=false) on the subject both mention it.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Iranian Vought V-507 Vagabond
Post by: elmayerle on March 10, 2014, 01:09:17 AM
Beautiful.  I'd love to see where they were planning to put the boom receptacle (I've got my own ideas that follow a reasonable logic, but...).
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Iranian Vought V-507 Vagabond
Post by: GTX_Admin on March 10, 2014, 02:50:18 AM
Thanks Logan

I'd love to see where they were planning to put the boom receptacle

Likewise.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Iranian Vought V-507 Vagabond
Post by: elmayerle on March 10, 2014, 12:09:08 PM
Thanks Logan

I'd love to see where they were planning to put the boom receptacle

Likewise.
My own thoughts are in front of the windscreen, either on centerline and plumbed to the pilot's right to pick up the line from where the probe regularly is or directly in front of the probe's location.  I suspect what equipment would need relocating would drive the location, but either of those would be the minimum-change locations.  I've looked at a cutaway of the F-14 and these still look like the best choices of locations.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Checkerboards Suck
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 24, 2014, 12:17:30 PM
Working on another profile.  I highly doubt anyone can guess the squadron, since it's not in the top 100 you'd associate with this, but still...checkerboards suck.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Checkerboards Suck
Post by: GTX_Admin on March 24, 2014, 04:49:02 PM
Working on another profile.  I highly doubt anyone can guess the squadron, since it's not in the top 100 you'd associate with this, but still...checkerboards suck.

Cheers,

Logan

German, Us , British or otherwise?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Checkerboards Suck
Post by: lauhof52 on March 24, 2014, 05:40:51 PM
Checkerboards.. US?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Checkerboards Suck
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 24, 2014, 10:40:36 PM
British, actually.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Checkerboards Suck
Post by: Volkodav on March 24, 2014, 11:20:35 PM
Tornado F2/3 alternative?  I cant wait.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Checkerboards Suck
Post by: GTX_Admin on March 25, 2014, 02:10:16 AM
It wouldn't happen to also have Shark's teeth would it...

(http://www.hasegawausa.com/product-images/hsgs9978main-lg.jpg)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - RAF SEAC P-61F Widow
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 25, 2014, 04:30:01 AM
Nope, no shark mouth this time.  As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Northrop-P-61F-Widow-Sqn-Ldr-Neil-Cameron-442534693).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/900px/RAFWidow1.jpg~original) (http://fc07.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2014/083/4/c/northrop_p_61f_widow___sqn__ldr__neil_cameron_by_comradeloganov-d7bh1yd.png)

In preparation for invasion of Japan, the RAF knew that it would need fighters with the range to escort the long range Lancasters and Lincolns being developed for Tiger Force.  Since the RAF had no suitable types for the role, it had a number of P-61Fs shipped directly from the US to India for training and operational experience on the type.  South East Asia Command (SEAC) was already flying Thunderbolts in the long range escort role, and it was one of these units that the RAF selected to be the first to transition to the big, new Northrop fighter.  No. 258 Squadron received its P-61Fs in Spring of 1945 and it soon came to appreciate the exceptional range and firepower of the Widow.  Its commander, Sqn. Ldr. Neil Cameron, had recently become an ace flying Thunderbolts.  While escorting Liberators over Rangoon on 11 February 1945, he shared in the destruction of a Ki-61, Cameron having previously enjoyed success flying Hurricanes in the UK, Russia, and the Middle East.  The aircraft of this initial batch of P-61Fs delivered to the RAF received the standard camouflage of Dark Earth and Dark Green uppersurfaces and Medium Sea Grey undersides.  They also reintroduced the checkerboard engine nacelles on the new aircraft, which came to be frequently employed in the ground attack role.  Subsequent P-61Fs would be delivered in the natural metal scheme common to USAAF aircraft at the time.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - RAF SEAC P-61F Widow
Post by: GTX_Admin on March 25, 2014, 03:19:56 PM
 :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - RAF SEAC P-61F Widow
Post by: apophenia on March 27, 2014, 09:52:16 AM
Well done Logan! The Widow looks really slick in SEAC colours  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 27, 2014, 10:47:29 AM
Thanks, guys!  As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Teodor-Moscu-s-Heinkel-He-100D-2-443049578).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/RomanianHe100D2.jpg~original) (http://fc09.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/085/6/a/teodor_moscu_s_heinkel_he_100d_2_by_comradeloganov-d7bs38q.png)

By the early summer of 1941, Romania—having allied herself with Hitler's Germany the previous year—was preparing for war with the Soviet Union, in order to recover Bessarabia (Eastern Moldavia) and Northern Bulkovina, territories lost the previous year.  The ARR (Aeronautica Regală Română), incorporated into Luftflotte 4, repositioned its units to Moldavia, close to the Soviet frontier.  Among the forward units was Grupul 5 vânătoare with its Heinkel He 100s.  On 15 June 1941, a week prior to Unternehmen Barbarossa, both Heinkel Escadrile were ordered to move to Focsani-North airfield in Southern Moldavia.

On Sunday, 22 June 1941, at dawn, the Romanian Heinkels took off on their first combat missions of the Second World War.  Their very first mission was to provide air cover for Potez 63 light bombers of Grupul 2 bombardament attacking the Soviet airfields of Bolgrad and Bulgãrica.  Twelve He 100s took off from Focsani at 1050, in gloomy weather and rendezvoused with the bombers over the airfield.  Light anti-aircraft fire was encountered en route, but this increased considerably over the first target, Bolgrad airfield.  Despite the heavy flak, the Soviet planes lined up on the runway were successfully hit by bombs and gunfire.  The warning, however, was immediately sent out to other units.  When the Romanian formation reached the second target, Bulgãrica airfield, it was greeted by numerous Soviet fighters, already alerted to the impending raid.  A bitter combat ensued between the dozen He 100s and some thirty I-16 Ratas.  In the event, the first air battle between the Russians and the Romanians was a victory for the latter.

At 1205, Sublocotenent aviator Teodor Moscu dove on the last pair of I-16s as they took off.  He fired a burst into one of them, sending it crashing in flames.  Pulling out of his dive, Moscu suddenly found himself face to face with another Rata.  He squeezed off a burst hitting Russian fighter in its radial engine.  This proved to be fatal for the Rata.  The wrecks of the aircraft went down in the Danube and quickly sank.  Now Moscu had his hands full!  Several I-16s bounced the Heinkel, one firing from Moscu's right front quarter.  He was hit in the starboard wing, his fuel tanks punctured and was losing fuel rapidly.  The rear fuselage received hits as well.  Second Lieutenant Moscu in a final effort fired a long burst at the attacking fighter, which abruptly dove and disappeared from sight.  Adjutant stagiar aviator Pavel Barbu, Moscu's wingman, joined up with him, escorting the damaged Heinkel home following the Danube River back to base.  The fuel warning light came on and, taking stock of his fuel crisis and structural damage, Moscu decided to put his machine down at the first available airfield.  This was Bârlad airfield, where the bullet-ridden fighter made a successful wheels-up landing.

Slt av Teodor Moscu was officially credited with two confirmed victories and became the first hero of the Romanian air force, in a war which had just started and was to prove a long and exhausting one.  Later, in an air battle of Cazaclia, Moscu added two more kills to his score.  His He 100D, No. 13, was repaired and rejoined Escadrila 51 vânătoare.  Note Walt Disney's "Pluto" squadron emblem.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: GTX_Admin on March 27, 2014, 03:40:19 PM
 :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: lauhof52 on March 28, 2014, 02:36:58 AM
 :) :) :) for both!

Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Vuk on March 28, 2014, 02:41:23 PM
Another beauty Logan!  :)

Are those colors also whiff or true? Somehow I can't recall of them on romanian wwII aircrafts...  ???
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Talos on March 29, 2014, 03:29:34 AM
Another beauty Logan!  :)

Are those colors also whiff or true? Somehow I can't recall of them on romanian wwII aircrafts...  ???

Logan would have the reference pics on him, but they're quite true. I just did a quick Google search and it returned He 112s in that same grey with yellow trim.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 29, 2014, 03:54:17 AM
Thanks for the kind words, everyone!  I like how colorful this one was.  Indeed, Vuk, it is a scheme from an actual Romanian He 112B/E.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v465/jcarlosroc/he112.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: GTX_Admin on March 29, 2014, 04:37:35 AM
Seen here too:

(http://www.ww2aircraft.net/forum/attachments/aircraft-pictures/173488d1311065718t-romanian-air-force-he_112_no11.jpg)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: apophenia on March 29, 2014, 04:51:20 AM
Sharp markings and they look excellent on the He-100D  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Vuk on March 29, 2014, 10:02:24 PM
Talos, Logan, thanks for the info.

I'm always looking forward to learn something new  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Volkodav on March 29, 2014, 10:09:13 PM
How did the He 100 actually rate against the BF-109, it was a nicer looking aircraft but what did the pilots thing and what was the performance like?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 29, 2014, 11:01:49 PM
Everything I've read about the He 100 seems to indicate that it was just better than the 109.  It was better in almost every way that I can see, except for one.  Its armament was worse.  As standard, the Bf 109E-3 had two 20mm cannons and two 7.92mm machine guns.  The He 100 had one less 20mm cannon as designed.  Even then, though, the armament of the Bf 109 was improved throughout its life and the He 100 would have been no different.

The main thing against the He 100 was that the Bf 109 was already in service and far better than anything in service anywhere else.  Imagine someone trying to replace the F-16 just a few years after it entered service with an aircraft that uses the same engine and is just 10-20% better.  I doubt anyone would have bitten.  Look at what happened to the F-20, for example.  The He 100 was in the same position.

Also, I have to admit, the He 100 never really got its cooling system worked out.  The evaporative cooling system and the retractable radiator both had their issues.  The Luftwaffe didn't consider it worth their time to try to get all that worked out when they had a perfectly good fighter already in service.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Volkodav on March 29, 2014, 11:27:50 PM
Thanks for that and the second I read f-16 I thought F-20 ;)  Good example that gets the point across, it was better in many ways but at the time it didn't matter enough to get it over the line.  I suppose the Martin Baker designs MB3 and in particular the MB5 are in the same boat so to speak, very good, maybe even superb, but the Spitfire was more than good enough at the time.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: GTX_Admin on March 30, 2014, 04:11:39 AM
It was better in almost every way that I can see, except for one.  Its armament was worse.  As standard, the Bf 109E-3 had two 20mm cannons and two 7.92mm machine guns.  The He 100 had one less 20mm cannon as designed. 

Though one should consider that in the F model onwards, the Bf-109 did reduce down to 3 guns for most models (ignoring the various Rüstsätze kits that added additional armament) and indeed, it has been regularly reported that pilots were happy with this set up for most encounters (heavy bombers being perhaps the only exception).  If it had entered service, I can easily see the He-100 ending up with something akin to the Bf-109G-6 onwards with twin 13 mm (.51 in) MG 131s and either a 20 mm MG 151/20 or a 30 mm (1.18 in) MK 108 engine-mounted cannon (Motorkanone) fitted. 

Perhaps the biggest issue counting against the He-100 was its use of the Daimler-Benz DB 601 which was heavily used already at that time.  This was one of the reasons why the Fw-190 with its BMW801 found favour (Kurt Tank, did originally want the DB601 as well I seem to recall).  Perhaps if Heinkel used either a DB 603 or DB605 or even a Junkers Jumo 213 they might have had more luck.  I somehow doubt the production facilities would have existed at this stage though.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 30, 2014, 08:54:39 AM
Oh, absolutely.  I don't think there was anything insurmountable preventing the He 100 from entering service.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: GTX_Admin on March 30, 2014, 09:05:16 AM
Nothing on the airframe side, though I do believe it would have been difficult on the engine front.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 30, 2014, 09:06:37 AM
If you phase out production of the 109 in favor of the He 100, you get the engines you need.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: GTX_Admin on March 30, 2014, 09:10:37 AM
True, though at the time the He100 was being put forward, the Luftwaffe were happy with the Bf109 and didn't see a need for an immediate replacement.

Yes, in the whiffverse one can do anything they like and I am certainly not trying to discourage such ideas.  It's just that in the real world, it didn't happen for valid reasons.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 30, 2014, 09:34:50 AM
Agree completely, as I pointed out in my reply to Volkodov.  There's another reason, as well, that we haven't mentioned.  The RLM at the time had a desire for manufacturers to specialize in certain aircraft types.  For example, they wanted Heinkel to focus on bombers after the success of the He 111 and they wanted Messerschmitt to focus on fighters.  This desire helped kill promising designs such as the He 100, He 280, and Me 264.  It also frustrated Heinkel's efforts to get the He 219 Uhu into service.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Talos on March 31, 2014, 11:53:19 AM
As I recall, there was also a little bit of concern about growth potential of the plane, since it was built around the DB 601 as the smallest airframe possible (which keeps drag to a minimum). Literally so if you take into account the way the engine mounts are integrated.

Mind you, I still had fun putting a Merlin on the He 100 Buchon, though.  ;)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Teodor Moscu's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 31, 2014, 12:30:30 PM
That's another reason why Talos and I both doubt the feasibility of the DB603 or Jumo 213 as viable alternatives on the airframe.  Those engines are really too beefy for that airframe.  It's not that re-engining is out of the question, however.  Something like the DB605 or Merlin would almost certainly work.  They fit on the basic 109 airframe and it was no bigger than the He 100.

I'd also point to the P-51 as a good comparison to the He 100.  It was the smallest production single seat airframe ever put behind the Allison V-1710.  It was designed to be that way.  Despite that, it took well to the Merlin and racers have even put Griffons on it.

All that to say, we don't really consider any of these impossible, but we do take these modifications very seriously.  We look at the weights, the internal layout, the engine dimensions, etc.  We scale all modifications and make sure they will or won't work to the best of our abilities.  Fortunately, though, with the exception of the troubling cooling system, Heinkel did most of the job right the first time.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - RAF B-51 Panther - 100 Squadron
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 06, 2014, 01:36:24 PM
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/RAF-Handley-Page-Panther-B-2-100-Squadron-445482986).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/B-51%20Panther/900px/RAFPanther4.jpg~original) (http://fc03.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2014/095/3/b/raf_handley_page_panther_b_2___100_squadron_by_comradeloganov-d7d88ve.jpg)

Here's another profile that I've done in collaboration with talos56.  In 1952 the RAF decided that it needed a low-level nuclear strike aircraft and that the Canberra did not fit this requirement.  This was in no small fact due to the US denying the British request to type approve the Canberra for carriage of the Mk 7 tactical nuclear weapon.  They obtained the production license for the aircraft, immediately transferring Handley Page's Canberra contract to Shorts while contracting Handley Page to quickly redesign the B-51 Panther to meet British service requirements.

The license production aircraft began reaching squadrons in the late 1950s, supplementing the V-bombers entering service at the same time.  Some squadrons used the Panther as an interim training aircraft to assist in transitioning to V-bombers such as the Vulcan and Victor.  Other squadrons operated the Panther in the nuclear deterrence role, based in mainland Europe.  One unit to transition from the Canberra to the Panther was No. 100 Squadron.  Painted in anti-flash white, this profile depicts an aircraft in 1963, after the adoption of the toned down roundels and squadron markings.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - RAF B-51 Panther - 100 Squadron
Post by: lauhof52 on April 07, 2014, 04:28:37 PM
Very nice that white-wash color scheme!! :) :)

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - RAF B-51 Panther - 100 Squadron
Post by: finsrin on April 07, 2014, 04:43:10 PM
Another sweet B-51 :)
Each one you do increases my desire for styrene injected 1/72 B-51. 
Doggone,,, where are model companies on doing this gem ?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Estonian Heinkel He 46G
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 08, 2014, 03:11:21 AM
Thanks, guys!  I'm glad you like it!  Here's one that I've been planning for a while, but just started yesterday.  I've also submitted this to the The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4279.msg68591#msg68591).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/EstonianHe46G1.jpg~original) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/EstonianHe46G1.jpg~original)

I hope everyone likes it!  Information on the Estonian Hs 126s is a little light and what is out there is contradictory, so I combined the elements that I liked the most aesthetically to arrive at this profile.  By the way, this is the first Estonian profile that I've ever done, so another first on the list of countries I've done.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Estonian Heinkel He 46G
Post by: GTX_Admin on April 08, 2014, 07:06:49 PM
 :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Estonian Heinkel He 46G
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 10, 2014, 12:25:15 PM
You ever have one of those cases where you decide to start a little project, then it turns out that it was a MUCH bigger project than you thought it was going to be?

You want to know what is worse?  It's a project that I originally turned down because I decided that it was too hard.  I then managed to convince myself that I was being a sissy and just start working on it.  Turns out that the project is about twice as hard as I ORIGINALLY feared it would be, maybe worse.  So much work left to do...

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Estonian Heinkel He 46G
Post by: apophenia on April 11, 2014, 06:21:42 AM
Ouch!  Love the Estonian Heinkel, though  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Estonian Heinkel He 46G
Post by: GTX_Admin on April 11, 2014, 08:14:37 AM
You ever have one of those cases where you decide to start a little project, then it turns out that it was a MUCH bigger project than you thought it was going to be?

You want to know what is worse?  It's a project that I originally turned down because I decided that it was too hard.  I then managed to convince myself that I was being a sissy and just start working on it.  Turns out that the project is about twice as hard as I ORIGINALLY feared it would be, maybe worse.  So much work left to do...


Oh, stop complaining ya big girl!  Get to it!!! ;)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop XF-15A Reporter
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 12, 2014, 12:20:12 AM
A bit of a rarity for me, this one is actually a real world profile, not a Whif.  As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Northrop-XF-15A-Reporter-446790909?ga_submit_new=10%253A1397229829&ga_type=edit&ga_changes=1&ga_recent=1).  I've also submitted this to the The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4293.msg68853#msg68853).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/1080px/USAAFReporter1.jpg~original) (http://fc00.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2014/101/8/e/northrop_xf_15a_reporter_by_comradeloganov-d7e0a2l.png)

The loss of Army interest in the XP-61E escort fighter was not to be the end of the line for the Black Widow. In the summer of 1945, the surviving XP-61E was modified as an unarmed photographic reconnaissance aircraft. All the guns were removed, and a new nose was fitted, capable of holding an assortment of aerial cameras. The aircraft was redesignated XF-15 (in the pre-1948 F-for photo recon series, not to be confused with the post-1948 F-for-fighter series). It flew for the first time on July 3, 1945, with Northrop test pilot L. A. "Slim" Parrett at the controls.

A P-61C-1-NO (serial number 42-8335) was also modified to XF-15 standards as the XF-15A. Apart from the turbosupercharged R-2800-C engines, it was identical to the XF-15 and flew for the first time on 17 October 1945. The nose for the F-15A-1-NO Reporter was subcontracted to the Hughes Tool Company of Culver City, California. The F-15A used the existing P-61C wings (without fighter brakes), engines and tail sections but with an entirely new, more streamlined fuselage housing a crew of two under a continuous bubble-canopy.

As a result of continuing development trouble with the Howard Hughes-designed XF-11, the staff of the Army Air Force Headquarters determined an immediate need for 320 F-15 Reporters. Even before the first flight of the XF-15 an initial contract for 175 aircraft was signed in June 1945. Following testing it was determined that the F-15 Reporter possessed similar performance and flight characteristics to the troublesome XF-11, despite the Reporter being powered by less powerful engines, and using mostly pre-existing parts. This spelled the end to further development of the XF-11.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/Detail/USAAFReporter1.jpg~original)

As you can see, there was actually a lot of effort that went into the new nose.  The shape is different, the panels are different, the rivets are COMPLETELY different and had to be redone from the XP-61F variant.  The camera fairings were new, as well.

So, why was I griping about this so much?  Why did I complain about it being so hard?  Well, a few reasons. First of all, the existing line art for Reporter noses is terrible.  It's almost all wrong.  Second, the left side and the right side of the nose are different, so you can't used any photos of the right side of the nose as reference.  Some of the line art is actually wrong because you can tell they mirrored the two sides of the nose.  The next problem is that there were a few variations of the nose between the prototypes and the production examples, even over the lifetime of the same aircraft.  There aren't a lot of good detail shots of the nose, either.  There's no surviving examples of the variant.  Those that were used postwar were generally modified to either use different cameras or eliminate the windows entirely, so they're also no help as references.

In short, it sucked.  But I think it turned out nice.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop XF-15A Reporter & NASA V-507!
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 12, 2014, 05:16:44 AM
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Vought-V-507-F-14-1X-Vagabond-NASA-Dryden-446852673).  I've also submitted this to the Space GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4297.msg68891#msg68891).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/1080px/NASAVagabond1.jpg~original) (http://fc05.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/101/c/3/vought_v_507_f_14__1x__vagabond___nasa_dryden_by_comradeloganov-d7e1lq9.png)

NASA 991, an F-14 Navy Vagabond designated the F-14 (1X), the 1X signifying that it was Vought's experimental testbed, was used at Dryden between 1979 and 1985 in extensive high-angle-of-attack and spin-control-and-recovery tests. The NASA/Navy program, which included 212 total flights, achieved considerable improvement in the F-14 high-angle-of-attack flying qualities, improved departure and spin resistance, and contributed to substantial improvements in reducing "wing rock," (i.e., tilting from one side to another), at high angles of attack.

NASA 991 had numerous special additions for high-angle-of-attack and spin-recovery research. These included a battery-powered auxiliary power unit, a flight test nose boom, and a special spin recovery system, consisting of forward mounted, hydraulically actuated canards and an emergency spin chute. NASA's F-14 was first flown by NASA research pilots, but was later flown by Vought, and by Navy test pilots from Naval Air Station (NAS) Patuxent River . The Navy test flights with the spin research vehicle constituted the first program that incorporated air combat maneuvering in its test flights at Dryden. The Navy brought F-14s from Point Mugu and NAS Miramar in San Diego to test the new spin control laws in combat situations.

Among the 212 flights completed for this research project, the F-14 also tested a flush air data system, for gathering data about air speed; provided an updated aeromodel, which is currently in use on Navy F-14 training simulators; created natural laminar flow baseline data for many of NASA's later laminar flow programs; and tested low altitude, asymmetric thrust. F-14s were later used in laminar flow studies in the Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment program (VSTFE) on NASA's F-14 #834. NASA 991 was delivered back to the Navy on September 6, 1985.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop XF-15A Reporter & NASA V-507!
Post by: lauhof52 on April 13, 2014, 01:25:47 AM
Bingo! Top drawing, Logan :) :)

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Nakajima A9He1 Herman - Rabaul
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 13, 2014, 10:06:46 AM
Thanks lauhof!  As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Japanese-Nakajima-A9He1-Herman-Heinkel-He-100-447134169).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/JapaneseHe100D3.jpg) (http://fc03.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/102/2/a/japanese_nakajima_a9he1_herman__heinkel_he_100__by_comradeloganov-d7e7mxl.png)

The IJNAF pilots gained experience with the Mitsubishi A6M Zero in combat over China and through continued testing, complains and recommendations began to come in to the Kōku Hombu.  The most vocal complaint concerned the fighter’s poor lateral control at high speeds.  As air speed increased above 180 mph, aileron response deteriorated rapidly, and above 230 mph, the Zero-sen became more difficult to roll.  Additionally, pilots wanted better performance at altitude.

In response, the IJNAF began delivering initial production A9He1s to combat units following successful flight trials in late 1941.  As a result of delays at Hitachi, Nakajima soon caught up in to combat units following successful flight trials in late 1941.  As a result of delays at Hitachi, Nakajima soon caught up in production of the A9He1 and the first units operated a mix of aircraft from both manufacturers.

The first unit to receive the new fighter was the 2nd Kōkūtai during the spring of 1942.  Operating in the New Guinea area, the A9He1’s short range prevented the 2nd Kōkūtai from reaching the battle over Guadalcanal during its early stages.  Other units received the A9He1, mainly in the Solomons area, but the new fighter was initially not well received by front line units due to its shorter range, complex inline engine, and worse maneuverability when compared to the A6M2 Zero.  This profile depicts Q-122, an A9He1 of the 2nd Kōkūtai during the summer of 1942 at Rabaul.  It has a blue fuselage band denoting a section leader and is missing its radio mast.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Nakajima A9He1 Herman - Rabaul
Post by: Matt Wiser on April 13, 2014, 01:37:22 PM
Good work on both, Logan! I take it the He-100 is a land-based interceptor, and the Zero stays on the carriers?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Nakajima A9He1 Herman - Rabaul
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 14, 2014, 01:19:31 PM
Thanks, Matt!  Indeed, that's the idea.  While originally procured with the potential that it might work on carriers, I imagine that the IJNAF would almost immediately regard the He 100 as unsuitable for carrier operations (at least with the IJN).  As a result, I plan to only use the A9He1 with land-based squadrons.  Still, though, that allows me to replace a great many Zero, Jack, and George units as the war goes on.

I must say, I've been surprisingly productive with profiles, lately.  I JUST finished another submission for the Spies GB, but I still have to save it at its various sizes, upload it, type up the backstory, etc.  So, it won't be until tomorrow that it's posted, but then I should get another one after that done pretty quickly, actually.  It's quite possible that I may get as many as six profiles done for the Spies GB if everything comes along well.

(http://i2.cdnds.net/11/41/tv_spy_robert_lindsay.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF RB-51E Patricia Lynn - Vietnam
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 15, 2014, 12:01:36 AM
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/USAF-Martin-RB-51E-Panther-Patricia-Lynn-Vietn-447490830).  I've also submitted this to the The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4304.msg69137#msg69137).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/B-51 Panther/900px/USAFPanther7.jpg) (http://fc02.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/104/b/c/usaf_martin_rb_51e_panther___patricia_lynn___vietn_by_comradeloganov-d7efa4u.jpg)

In 1963, the General Dynamics plant at Fort Worth, Texas was awarded a contract to modify two B-51Bs as all-weather reconnaissance aircraft. The forward nose section was modified to house a KA-1 36-inch forward oblique and a low panoramic KA-56 camera. Mounted inside the specially-configured bomb bay door was a KA-1 vertical camera, a K-477 split vertical day-night camera, an infrared scanner, and a KA-1 left oblique camera. The lengthened nose gave the aircraft -- redesignated RB-51E -- a distinctive appearance.

The RB-51E aircraft were assigned to a secret project known as Patricia Lynn that operated out of Tan Son Nhut airport in Saigon. The lead engineer of the project was given the option of naming the program, so he chose the name of his wife. Beginning in May of 1963, the Patricia Lynn unit flew nighttime reconnaissance missions to identify VC base camps, small arms factories, and storage and training areas. In December 1964 two more B-51Bs were modified to RB-51E specifications and sent to Vietnam. The United States began Operation Steel Tiger over the Panhandle and the DMZ on April 3, 1965, to locate and destroy enemy forces and materiel being moved southward at night into South Vietnam. On a typical mission, the RB-51E was accompanied by B-51B bombers and C-130 flare ships. After a strike, the Patricia Lynn aircraft would complete a bomb damage assessment reconnaissance run over the previous attacked target area.

A fifth aircraft was received in November 1965. These five aircraft formed Detachment 1 of the 460th Tactical Reconnaissance Wing (earlier 6250th Combat Support Group and earlier still 33rd Tactical Group). Two RB-51Es were lost in combat operations. The first (55-4243) was lost as a result of a fuselage fire caused by small arms while on a low level reconnaissance mission. The crew ejected safely when near Tan Son Nhut Air Base. The second aircraft (55-4264) was lost on Oct. 15, 1968, after an engine fire started by ground fire forced the crew to eject. A sixth Patricia Lynn aircraft (55-4251) joined the team in 1968, this one equipped with terrain-following radar. There were frequent changes and updating of the equipment, including the installation of 12-inch focal length KA-82 and 24-inch focal length KA-83 cameras. The infrared equipment was useful in spotting Viet Cong river traffic at night along the Mekong delta southeast of Saigon. In 1969/70, Patricia Lynn missions were flown into Laos and into Cambodia. The aircraft were withdrawn from combat operations in mid-1971.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/B-51%20Panther/Detail/USAFPanther7.jpg)

Here's a closeup of the new nose on the Patricia Lynn B-51.  This profile actually had a LOT of work on it, more than just the nose.  The NMF was redone to make sure that it toned down, less blue, and more worn from service.  I had to redo the engine reflection, tail light & shading, wing tank lighting & shading, weathering, and much of the other paint and markings. 

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF RB-51E Patricia Lynn - Vietnam
Post by: Matt Wiser on April 15, 2014, 09:44:54 AM
Even the He-100 would show its age by 1943, and the Jack and George might still get the go-ahead. The Jack was meant to be a bomber interceptor, and the George turned out to be the best land-based fighter the JNAF had. (and there was a planned carrier-based version as well)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Greek Heinkel He 46K-2 - Tsarouhi
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 15, 2014, 02:29:32 PM
Indeed, Matt.  I don't see it as a complete replacement for any of those types.  It just means I get to steal their markings for future profiles.

Just finished this one tonight.  This one was actually pretty involved.  Custom camouflage, custom roundel, custom numbering, custom Browning FN machine gun, custom bomb rack, custom "American-type" bomb, and custom "Tsarouhi" marking on the side of the aircraft.  All were made just for this profile.  Nothing was an easy drag and drop on this profile, but I REALLY like the way it all came together.  I also submitted this profile to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4306.msg69209#msg69209).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/GreekHe46K1.jpg~original) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/GreekHe46K1.jpg~original)

The acquisition of Heinkel He 46s to augment and replace the obsolete Potez 25 A.2s and Breguet 19 A.2/B.2s was apparently initiated in spring 1935. The Heinkel Flugzeugwerke A.G. was advised by the Reichsverband der Deutschen Luftfahrt-Industrie (RDLI) in July 1935 that the Greek air force was interested in their "multi-role aircraft", whereupon Heinkel made preparations to meet an order for 16 to 32 He 46s. Greek officers visited the Heinkel factory in Rostock-Marienehe in November 1935, and one of them flew an He 46.

The contract finally signed on 18 April 1936, covered the purchase, for approximately three million Reichsmark, of 16 export versions of the Heinkel He 46 (type K) with five spare engines, maintenance equipment and 16 additional bomb racks. In the end, the latter were never delivered and Greece was forced to develop their own solution. The aircraft were also provided with luxurious editions of German maintenance manuals translated into Greek. The contract made provision for possible follow-up sales and license manufacturing parts and materials. The contract did not cover the mounting for the observer's gun on each He 46 or various other items of equipment, which surely included the choice of the type of machine gun the acquisition of these being left to the purchaser. A Greek acceptance commission started work at Rostock-Marienehe in June 1936, Athens having meanwhile expressed a wish to purchase further aircraft. Construction of the 16 export version He 46Ks was completed by September 1936, and Greek ferry pilots arrived in late November for delivery by air to Tatoi aerodrome at Athens.

The suffix "K" (Kampf, i.e. combat) appended to the designation of the He 46s delivered to Greece, also indicates they were neither standard He 46E-1s nor He 46G-ls, that some items of equipment were not identical with those fitted on the Luftwaffe versions and/or that modifications had been specified by the Royal Hellenic Air Force (RHAF). It was powered by the BMW 132 and the radio equipment was downgraded compared with that used by the Luftwaffe. The armament comprised a 7.92 mm FN Browning on a flexible mounting for the observer. Locally manufactured "American-type" 50 kg and 14 kg bombs were carried on racks of RHAF design fitted under the fuselage just behind the landing gear, under the pilot's cockpit and in the bay behind the observer's cockpit.

On 28 October 1940 at 5.30am, Italian troops based in Albania attacked Greece. The Heinkels were entered service with the 3rd Army Cooperation Squadron and were ready for action. The first aircraft lost by the Greek Air Force during the Italian invasion was a He 46. Apart from extensive reconnaissance, the Greek He 46s were often used successfully against enemy troops and ground targets. One of the successful and unusual actions was flown on 21 November 1940, when three He 46s of the 3rd Squadron scattered a 6 km long column of Italian troops at Pogradec in just one attack.

Early on April 6, 1941, Hitler launched the assault on Greece and Yugoslavia, Operation Marita, to rescue the Italian army in retreat in Albania and to prevent British forces from establishing bases in Greece from which bombers could raid the oil fields in Romania vital to the German war effort. Third squadron with its Heinkels was based at Agrinion in western Greece when, on April 22, the airfield was strafed by Messerschmitt Bf 109s with devastating effect, five of the Do 22Kgs and all but one Heinkel being destroyed. Later in the day the last serviceable Heinkel, was flown to Argos in the Peloponnese to join the surviving Potez 25s, PZL P.24s and some other aircraft, as well as RAF Hurricanes. On April 23 Argos was successively attacked by Dornier Do 17Zs, Junkers Ju 88s, Bf 109s and finally almost all the Greek aircraft had been destroyed. The German forces advancing into Greece in April 1941 found a damaged Heinkel He 46 coded Σ (Sigma) 43 on an abandoned Greek airfield. Obviously this or any other Greek Heinkel was never used by the Luftwaffe.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Greek Heinkel He 46K-2 - Tsarouhi
Post by: lauhof52 on April 17, 2014, 01:35:37 AM
The RB-51 looks so real!! 8)

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop F-15A Reporter - NACA Ames
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 18, 2014, 03:05:29 AM
Thanks, Paul!  I was really pleased with how it turned out once I got the funky nose integrated on the aircraft.

Finished another "real world" profile today.  This one required a lot of work to do the drop test object, something there weren't great references for.  As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Northrop-F-15A-Reporter-NACA-Ames-Laboratory-448200013).  I've also submitted this to the Space GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4315.msg69364#msg69364).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/900px/NACAReporter1.jpg~original) (http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2014/107/9/6/northrop_f_15a_reporter___naca___ames_laboratory_by_comradeloganov-d7euhcd.png)

The last flying example of the entire P-61 line was a rare F-15A Reporter (RF-61C) (s/n 45-59300), the first production model Reporter to be built. The aircraft was completed on 15 May 1946, and served with the Army Air Corps and later the U.S. Air Force until 6 February 1948, when it was reassigned to the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory at Moffett Field in California for transonic aerodynamic research. Interest in the transonic flight regime increased markedly after the Second World War, reflecting further attempts to increase aircraft performance. However, wind tunnels of the time were inadequate for carrying out this kind of research. In one approach to acquiring transonic aerodynamic data, heavily weighted models of the configuration of interest were dropped from high altitudes. In those tests, which were conducted at Edwards Air Force Base, aerodynamic bodies that were to be evaluated in the transonic flight regime were released from an aircraft at altitudes up to 43,000 feet. The instrumented bodies would pass through the transonic speed range in free fall, during which they were oscillated through a range of angles of attack and were then decelerated and recovered by means of air brakes and parachutes. Testing at these altitudes was arduous and, although the pilots wore heavy flight suits, the model drops were made on the first run to reduce the pilots' exposure to the extreme cold.

(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8314/7957616158_6ac409bdc4.jpg)

The F-15A-1-NO aircraft, a reconnaissance model of the P-61 night fighter, was reconfigured to serve as a launch vehicle for these tests. The high-altitude capability of the F-15A made it the ideal "mother ship" for this work. An aircraft similar to this one, an ERF-61C, owned by the Smithsonian Institution, was lent to Ames to be used in this program as well. Pilots who participated in this work were George Cooper, Rudolph (Rudy) Van Dyke, Don Heinle, and Fred Drinkwater. As with the wing-flow tests, qualitative results were obtained; nevertheless, the advent of the new transonic tunnels supplanted flight testing as a means of documenting the aerodynamics of this flight regime. The air-brake and parachute systems developed for these tests were subsequently used by many agencies for rocket and satellite payload recovery. In April, 1955, the F-15A was declared surplus along with a "spare parts" F-61C (s/n 43-8357).

(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8308/7958393208_a89a43fdb3.jpg)

Here's a closeup of the nose showing the new pitot, new camera window, new rivet pattern, new panels and panel lines, and new bottom camera fairing.  In short, basically a new nose again.  I feel like a plastic surgeon on this plane, I'm doing so many nose jobs.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/Detail/NACAReporter1.jpg~original)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop F-15A Reporter - NACA Ames
Post by: Matt Wiser on April 18, 2014, 11:06:40 AM
Great work, Logan! Too bad neither the Reporter or the F-61 "spares" bird were picked up by museums. There's only four known Black Widows on display anywhere.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop F-15A Reporter - NACA Ames
Post by: Vuk on April 18, 2014, 02:36:27 PM
Beautiful work as always, Logan.

I mentioned on some other topic that I'm GoldenAge/WWII freak, but there's something in those research/science aircrafts also.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop F-15A Reporter - NACA Ames
Post by: lauhof52 on April 18, 2014, 03:58:47 PM
Really excellent nose-work! :) :)

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Northrop F-15A Reporter - NACA Ames
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 20, 2014, 01:11:26 PM
Thanks, guys!  I'm really glad you liked them.  I thought the recent profile batch has turned out pretty well.  More to come soon!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - V-507 TARPS - VF-111 Sundowners - Miss Molly
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 21, 2014, 03:53:36 AM
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/V-507-F-14A-TARPS-VF-111-Sundowners-Miss-Molly-448930066).  I've also submitted this to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4321.msg69594#msg69594).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/900px/USNVagabond3.jpg~original) (http://fc01.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/110/a/2/v_507_f_14a_tarps___vf_111_sundowners___miss_molly_by_comradeloganov-d7fa4nm.png)

When the USS Carl Vinson was launched on March 15, 1980, the honor of christening the ship was given to its sponsor, Molly Snead, a devoted friend and administrative assistant to Congressman Carl Vinson who nursed his wife (who suffered from severe arthritis) during the years that led up to Mary Vinson's death in 1950. Molly was honored further when a C-1 Trader carrier onboard delivery (COD) aircraft was named for her, but with the C-1's retirement from active service in 1988, VF-111 chose to adopt the scheme. Lt. Mark Conn, an artist, kept the tradition alive on VF-111's CAG bird, painting WWII style nose-art of a Navy nurse and the name "Miss Molly" on BuNo 161621 (TARPS). The unique combination of bold artwork and bright squadron markings made "Miss Molly" one of the most colorful F-14s ever flown.

The Sundowners were originally commissioned as VF-11 at NAS North Island on October 10, 1942. The name Sundowners refers to the squadron's job of shooting down Japanese "Suns", but it also refers to an old nautical term. A Sundowner was also a ship's captain who directed his crew towards hard work until the day was ended. The term originated in the days of sailing ships when grog was customarily served on ships. A strict captain might withhold the ration until dark, but others allowed the grog to be served when the sun dipped below the yardarm.

By the mid-1970s the Navy was looking for a new reconnaissance platform to replace the RA-5C Vigilantes and RF-8G Crusaders, which by this time were showing their age. Initial studies looked at a dedicated recon variant of the Vagabond, the RF-14, but by 1974 this was dropped in favor of an 'interim' solution-the TARPS (Tactical Air Reconnaissance Pod System).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/Detail/TARPS.png~original)

The TARPS system began development in April of 1976, using a system originally developed for the A-7 Corsair II. Flight testing of the pod began in April 1977, using the no.5 F-14A (BuNo 157984). At this stage the pod was carried on the right hand wing pylon, in place of a drop tank and resembled a squared off version of the drop tank, including fins on the rear of the pod. During development the pod was moved to the center fuselage station and became more rounded in appearance. After successfully completing testing, procurement began in 1978 and was completed by 1984. To carry the pod F-14s had to be specially adapted to the task and as a result 65 F-14A aircraft were modified. The modified aircraft received extra electrical power and air-conditioning, as well as undergoing modification to the NFO cockpit to add a new display and operating controls for the pod. Carriage of the unit had a negligible effect on performance and handling. The unit could be fitted or removed in 30 minutes.

Designed for the low/medium altitude clear air reconnaissance role, TARPS consisted of a 17.29ft (5.27m) shell with a max width of 2.21ft (0.67m). Fully equipped weight was 1,760lb (798kg), with a standard load consisting of a KS-87M conventional frame camera in the nose, with a KA-99 low altitude panoramic camera mounted at the midpoint. Next to the KA-99 was an AN/AAD-3A infrared line scanner, for all weather/all hours reconnaissance missions. TARPS received its operational debut during the second half of 1982, when TARPS F-14s flew over Lebanon to pinpoint terrorist positions.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - V-507 TARPS - VF-111 Sundowners - Miss Molly
Post by: lauhof52 on April 21, 2014, 05:36:57 PM
This is really a purchase fro the Sundowners! TOP!

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - V-507 TARPS - VF-111 Sundowners - Miss Molly
Post by: Volkodav on April 21, 2014, 05:40:23 PM
The TARP and tanks just make an already cool looking aircraft super aggressive, top job.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - V-507 TARPS - VF-111 Sundowners - Miss Molly
Post by: Slerski on April 21, 2014, 08:26:28 PM
Very nice plane, I like it. May I request one in French markings ? I think it might be a very plausible interceptor for the French Navy
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - V-507 TARPS - VF-111 Sundowners - Miss Molly
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 21, 2014, 10:39:00 PM
Thanks, guys!  I think it is definitely looking more "real" with all the stuff hanging off it now.  Don't worry, Slerski, you'll definitely end up seeing one in Aéronavale markings.  It's a Vought product with French roots, so it only made sense.  It's something we planned from the beginning, but we need a bit more to do it.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - V-507 TARPS - VF-111 Sundowners - Miss Molly
Post by: taiidantomcat on April 22, 2014, 06:43:42 AM
Any planes to do a "bombcat" style like Iraq in 2003-5 or Afghanistan? Any plans for Iran?

Keep up the great profiles  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - V-507 TARPS - VF-111 Sundowners - Miss Molly
Post by: Matt Wiser on April 22, 2014, 09:59:32 AM
Great job! Always nice to see the Sundowners. Now, what about the IRIAF and a MiG-25 killer from the 1980-88 unpleasantness?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - V-507 TARPS - VF-111 Sundowners - Miss Molly
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 22, 2014, 10:20:12 AM
Thanks, taiidan and Matt!  We've already done one Iranian bird, but we'll be doing some IRIAF ones later.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/900px/IranianVagabond1.jpg) (http://fc08.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/066/4/f/vought_v_507_f_14a_vagabond___iran_by_comradeloganov-d79bjij.png)

As for a B-model, we have one planned, but it will be pretty extensive, so it won't happen for a little while.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - V-507 TARPS - VF-111 Sundowners - Miss Molly
Post by: apophenia on April 23, 2014, 07:35:39 AM
The TARP and tanks just make an already cool looking aircraft super aggressive, top job.

Agreed. Gorgeous work, Logan!  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - V-507 TARPS - VF-111 Sundowners - Miss Molly
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 23, 2014, 12:39:23 PM
Thanks, apophenia!  I've got a couple more profiles almost finished and will be posting them in the next couple of days.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF Martin RB-51A Panther - Europe
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 24, 2014, 12:50:46 AM
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/USAF-Martin-RB-51A-Panther-449499654).  I've also submitted this to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4328.msg69753#msg69753).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/B-51 Panther/900px/USAFPanther8.jpg) (http://fc01.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2014/113/c/c/usaf_martin_rb_51a_panther___europe_by_comradeloganov-d7fmc5i.jpg)

The Martin RB-51A was a reconnaissance version of the B-51A bomber. The decision to develop a reconnaissance version of the B-51A was made in 1951, guided by experience in the Korean War, which had underscored some USAF reconnaissance shortcomings in the face of increasingly effective enemy air defenses. Cameras and the removal of the 20mm guns constituted the main differences between the RB-51A and the B-51A. The cameras (P-2s, K-17s, K-37s, K-38s, or T-17s) could be interchanged according to the aircraft's mission. The intended mission included day and night, high and low, and visual and photographic reconnaissance. It was painted with a high gloss black paint which was intended to minimize detection by searchlights.

The 30th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron at Sembach received it's first RB-51 on the 30th November 1954. The RB-51As were mission ready in early 1955 and shared the workload with the RB-26s. The latter aircraft took the lion's share of the mission responsibility in Exercise Carte Blanche, which took place in June 1955; but the RB-51s participated. This exercise was designed to test the latest concepts in dispersal, tactical air control and execution of alert plans in the event of an atomic war. The squadron completed 94 out of the 122 missions assigned to it; of which 81 were deemed successful. During the latter months of 1955 the 30th TRS, 66th TRW built up to full strength on the RB-51A. The RB-51's were ferried from the states by the squadron crews who had gone over to pick them up.

Several exercises during the period held the attention of the aircrews of all the tactical reconnaissance squadrons, not least the 'freshmen' RB-51 crews. Exercise Fox Paw from the 1st to the 4th October engaged the 30th TRS for the first time on night reconnaissance missions. Exercise Whipsaw from the 26th to the 28th September 1956 involved all the tactical reconnaissance units of USAFE. It was a major exercise 'designed to test, practice and evaluate current plans, policies and procedures promulgated by SACEUR and subordinate commanders for the employment of nuclear weapons in the defence of allied Europe.' The principle mission profile for tactical reconnaissance was to fly pre-strike, post-strike and weather reconnaissance missions. The 30th were more than satisfied with their performance. 33 bombing sorties were flown against 54 targets, all of which were hit. Total flying time was 100 hours of which 25 were at night. A total of 58 photographic sorties were flown and photo coverage of 4 targets was completed.

Following the problems that had been encountered with the RB-51s the success of Whipsaw was a boost for the 30th TRS; but, in any event, the days of the aircraft were numbered as the McDonnell RF-101A Voodoo began to go into production; arriving in the European theatre during late 1951.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF Martin RB-51A Panther - Europe
Post by: GTX_Admin on April 24, 2014, 02:07:18 AM
Sweet. :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF Martin RB-51A Panther - Europe
Post by: ChernayaAkula on April 24, 2014, 02:55:50 AM
Absolutely gorgeous!  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 24, 2014, 05:15:34 AM
Thanks, guys!  More yellow stripes to follow.  As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/USAAF-F-15A-Reporter-Flying-Undertaker-Shomo-449614595).  I've also submitted this to the The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4329.msg69766#msg69766).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/900px/USAAFReporter2.jpg~original) (http://fc02.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/113/6/6/usaaf_f_15a_reporter___flying_undertaker___shomo_by_comradeloganov-d7fosub.png)

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR to

(https://www.ww2incolor.com/d/498000-4/CaptShomo)(http://graphics.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/medal-of-honor/img/medal-army-lg.jpg)

MAJOR WILLIAM A. SHOMO
UNITED STATES ARMY AIR FORCE

for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

Quote
  Maj. Shomo was lead pilot of a flight of 2 fighter planes charged with an armed photographic and strafing mission against the Aparri and Laoag airdromes. While en route to the objective, he observed an enemy twin engine bomber, protected by 12 fighters, flying about 2,500 feet above him and in the opposite direction Although the odds were 13 to 2, Maj. Shomo immediately ordered an attack. Accompanied by his wingman he closed on the enemy formation in a climbing turn and scored hits on the leading plane of the third element, which exploded in midair. Maj. Shomo then attacked the second element from the left side of the formation and shot another fighter down in flames. When the enemy formed for Counterattack, Maj. Shomo moved to the other side of the formation and hit a third fighter which exploded and fell. Diving below the bomber he put a burst into its underside and it crashed and burned. Pulling up from this pass he encountered a fifth plane firing head on and destroyed it. He next dived upon the first element and shot down the lead plane; then diving to 300 feet in pursuit of another fighter he caught it with his initial burst and it crashed in flames. During this action his wingman had shot down 3 planes, while the 3 remaining enemy fighters had fled into a cloudbank and escaped. Maj. Shomo's extraordinary gallantry and intrepidity in attacking such a far superior force and destroying 7 enemy aircraft in one action is unparalleled in the southwest Pacific area.


After Major William Shomo achieved his stunning success on 11 January 1945, the 71st Reconnaissance Group re-equipped with Northrop F-15A Reporters. Unlike the earlier North American F-6A Mustang that retained its six .50 cals, the F-15A Reporter was unarmed as built, the 20mm cannon ports being covered. Based on experiences such as Shomo's, the Fifth Air Force refused to fly the F-15A on combat missions until they had 20mm cannons installed, just as the Black Widow had. Northrop shipped kits out to equip the rest of the aircraft, while future F-15As produced by Northrop were armed. On his previous aircraft, Shomo had "The Flying Undertaker" painted on the left side and "Snooks" painted on the right. Given the greater real estate of the F-15 Reporter, Shomo's crew chief decided to paint "The Flying Undertaker" on both sides of the fuselage and "Snooks 7th" on both engine cowlings.

And here's a closeup of some of the noseart that I made for this profile.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/Detail/USAAFReporter2.jpg~original)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
Post by: lauhof52 on April 24, 2014, 02:06:14 PM
Both profiles are TOP! Logan and so are the stories! :)

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
Post by: Diamondback on April 24, 2014, 02:27:11 PM
For some reason, I wondered if Capt. Shomo was going to show up... :) he's one of the Mustang aces I wish were better known, because of the fact that while he wasn't a top scorer he did his thing while nominally flying RECON missions.

Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 24, 2014, 10:57:01 PM
Thanks lauhof and Diamondback!  Shomo's story really is amazing.  There are two things I love about it.  First is that he and his wingman were supposed to meet up with a Mustang squadron for the recon flight over the enemy airbase, but their escorts never showed up so they decided to just complete the mission unescorted.  Turns out they didn't need it!  The second thing that I love is that in most of these stories from WWII are tempered by later evidence that the enemy only lost four aircraft total, for example.  In this case, though, Shomo and his wingman flew over all the crash sites and took photos of all their kills.  That's one way to confirm them!

I've loved the story of his incredible story since having first read about it in this book as a kid.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51-%2BI6HDdXL._SL500_AA300_.jpg) (http://www.amazon.com/Top-Guns-Joe-Foss/dp/0671683179/)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
Post by: Matt Wiser on April 25, 2014, 09:12:06 AM
In all fairness to the people who claimed x number of kills on a particular mission, they were made in good faith, and medals often were awarded based on the best intelligence information available at the time. The same went for the USN submarine force: skippers claimed sinkings and were duly awarded medals for those patrols, but postwar accounting either cut the number of sinkings, the tonnage amount, or both. Even when skippers presented photographic evidence of ships sinking when the postwar accounting was wiping the claim, their claims were not recognized. But conversely, skippers who were only credited with "damage" to a ship during the war were surprised at the end of the war to find that the ship they had "damaged" had in fact gone down!

Sorry for the above-but it had to be pointed out. Nice artwork, and you can bet that in OLYMPIC, he would've had the opportunity to add to his score..
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 25, 2014, 10:23:31 AM
I don't disagree, Matt!  I don't blame pilots for overclaiming.  It happened with all countries, all service, and it has throughout history.  I remember one Soviet apologist on a forum recently who was investigating USAF claims in the Korean War and their excessive kill ratio.  His research quickly showed that the USAF pilots were indeed overclaiming.  Unfortunately, as he dug further, he discovered that his heroes, the expert Soviet pilots of the 64th Fighter Corps, were just as guilty of this as the American pilots he was looking to expose.  In short, everyone did it, and it wasn't intentional.  It's just human nature.

I also agree that commendations or official claims shouldn't retroactively be changed as research sheds new light on actual losses.  One of my favorite subjects to read about are cases where a pilot or submarine captain sunk a major vessel without even realizing it.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
Post by: Volkodav on April 25, 2014, 10:32:57 AM
I don't disagree, Matt!  I don't blame pilots for overclaiming.  It happened with all countries, all service, and it has throughout history.  I remember one Soviet apologist on a forum recently who was investigating USAF claims in the Korean War and their excessive kill ratio.  His research quickly showed that the USAF pilots were indeed overclaiming.  Unfortunately, as he dug further, he discovered that his heroes, the expert Soviet pilots of the 64th Fighter Corps, were just as guilty of this as the American pilots he was looking to expose.  In short, everyone did it, and it wasn't intentional.  It's just human nature.

I also agree that commendations or official claims shouldn't retroactively be changed as research sheds new light on actual losses.  One of my favorite subjects to read about are cases where a pilot or submarine captain sunk a major vessel without even realizing it.

Cheers,

Logan

I remember reading something on the Shinano sinking where the captain claimed a carrier and they gave him a freighter as no such carrier existed.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
Post by: Matt Wiser on April 25, 2014, 12:59:34 PM
The best way to prevent overclaiming: a gun camera in every bird. Nowadays that's a given, but in those days? Not very likely. And there's been rumors that one guy who had the opportunity to become an ace in two wars passed it up. Robin Olds had four MiG kills in his SEA tour, and almost had #5 if not for the wretched AIM-4 Falcon missile. Once Sidewinders were refitted to his F-4s, he had ten chances to get his fifth MiG, but he'd been told that once he did that, the Secretary of the Air Force, Harold Brown (Carter's SECDEF) would pull him from combat as a publicity asset. It's rumored he did kill his fifth MiG, but either didn't claim it, or let his wingman take credit.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 25, 2014, 01:08:10 PM
German pilots in Spain reportedly did the same thing.  They didn't claim kills in order to not get pulled from the theatre.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
Post by: Old Wombat on April 25, 2014, 04:03:52 PM
I remember one story about the Luftwaffe, where one of their senior generals wryly pointed out that in (iirc) a single week his pilots claimed to have wiped out the RAF twice over with the number of kills claimed.

Also, kills could be rejected (post-war) on the basis that a plane made it back to base, even if that plane was unable to be restored to service.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
Post by: arc3371 on April 25, 2014, 06:52:10 PM
A lot of great planes Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Bulgarian Heinkel He 46G Sova
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 26, 2014, 06:39:59 AM
Thanks, arc!  Here's one that I like because it's quite plausible, and it's just pretty.  In fact, it's often misreported that the Bulgarian Air Force operated He 46s (on Wikipedia, for example), but they didn't--just He 45s and 51s.  I've also submitted this to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4337.msg69949#msg69949).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/BulgarianHe46G1.jpg~original) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/BulgarianHe46G1.jpg~original)

In the mid-1930s, Tsar Boris III of Bulgaria initiated a rearmament policy which virtually ignored the restrictions of the Neuilly Treaty. On 28 July 1935, the war minister officially created the new Bulgarian Air Force (Vâzdushni Voyski).

In 1936 Hitler supplied the new air arm with 12 Heinkel He 51B fighters and 18 He 46 reconnaissance aircraft. These aircraft were the personal gift of Reichmarschall Hermann Göring to Boris III and were delivered in late 1936. The He 46 was nicknamed "Sova" (Owl) and was used by the Troop Yato (Squadron) of the 3. Army Orliak (Group) and the Recce Yato of the Training Orliak for the reconnaissance role. They served with the 2nd Army Orliak until 1942 and operated with the fuselage codes of 11, 22 and 33.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Bulgarian Heinkel He 46G Sova
Post by: GTX_Admin on April 26, 2014, 06:44:29 AM
That is nice! :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Bulgarian Heinkel He 46G Sova
Post by: apophenia on April 28, 2014, 10:59:06 AM
It is. I love those pre-war Bulgarian markings! Nice work, Logan  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Bulgarian Heinkel He 46G Sova
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 29, 2014, 03:07:47 AM
Thanks, guys!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought SB4U Viking - USS Wasp
Post by: Logan Hartke on May 07, 2014, 01:17:41 AM
As per usual with the Vikings, note that this is reduced to 33%. Click on the profile to see it on Photobucket where you can click again and see it at 100%. I've also submitted this to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies etc GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4371.msg70573#msg70573).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/USNViking12.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/?action=view&current=USNViking12.jpg)

Rising sun ‘victory flags' were exceptional on SB4Us at any time. Erroneous profiles published in the past 30 years display 'meatballs' on some scout-bombers, especially the Scouting Two aircraft of Lt. (jg) Leppla and Radioman Liska. However, the USS Wasp’s two SB4U squadrons flaunted their success over Japanese aircraft at the start of the Guadalcanal campaign. Wasp's Vikings stole a march on the carrier's two fighter squadrons, with seven actual shootdowns before the F4Fs notched their first. VS-71's Lt. (jg) R L Howard shot down a Rabaul-based A6M2 fighter over Tulagi on 8 August 1942 at the start of the Guadalcanal campaign.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c9/USS_Wasp_%28CV-7%29.jpg)

On 25 August, SB4U-4 BuNo 03315 was flown by two pilots to shoot down three Japanese aircraft. During the morning search at 0657 about 150 miles northwest of the force, VS-71's Lt. (jg) Chester V. Zalewski noticed a twin-float seaplane cruising at 1,500 feet. It fled towards some clouds, but Zalewski's below-rear attack swiftly flamed it. One crewman jumped from the burning plane, but never opened his chute. "Feeling pretty good over his achievement," as Zalewski later wrote, he resumed his search. At 0825, only 30 miles from home plate, he spotted a similar seaplane approaching about 500 feet above. This time he torched the enemy plane before the crew could react, and again a hapless Japanese jumped before his flaming aircraft crashed into the sea. The sharpshooting Zalewski destroyed two Type 0 reconnaissance seaplanes commanded by WO Nakamura Saburō and WO Adachi Hisaji from heavy cruiser Atago (Kondō's flagship). Lt. Roy E. Breen, Jr. (USNA 1939), of VS-72, shot up a third enemy seaplane, another Type 0 from the Myōkō, only 30 miles from TF-18. The Japanese got away, but only after Breen expended all his bullets.

(https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8459/8023779906_b91a9d18ee_z.jpg)

Other than raising havoc with Kondō's morning search, the Wasp's SB4Us sighted no ships, because the Japanese drew northward out of range. From the AirSoPac morning search reports, Rear Admiral Noyes learned of more ships too distant to attack. More accessible targets appeared to westward. At 1007 Lt. James J. Murphy in 23-P-1 sighted Tanaka's battered invasion convoy, with the Kinryū Maru being abandoned. A little later, CACTUS announced Mangrum's attack. Hoping his forces would renew battle that morning, an impatient Nimitz sent the following to Ghormley and Fletcher: "Realize situation still critical but exchange of damage to date seems to be in our favor...Let's finish off those carriers." Fortunately the Japanese had withdrawn out of reach of the outmatched Wasp.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9b/HIJMS_Akitsushima_and_Kawanishi_H8K1_in_1942.jpg)

Noyes turned northwest, and at 1326 the Wasp dispatched Lieutenant Commander Beakley with twenty-four SB4Us and ten TBFs on a search/attack mission against the convoy. Among these aircraft was SB4U-4 BuNo 03315 that Zalewski had piloted that morning. While they took off a 14th Air Group Kawanishi Type 2 flying boat (Spec. Duty Ens. Itō Tatsuhisa) snooped TF-18 and at 1345 reported one carrier, two cruisers, and six destroyers ("whether enemy's or ours unknown") bearing 110 degrees and 514 miles from Shortland. Easing into position several miles to abeam as the Wasp planes climbed to 12,000 feet, Itō shadowed the strike group as it headed west toward his base. After about 40 minutes, the big Type 2 flying boat had foolishly closed within 3,000 yards of the nearest Wasp planes, which had finally noticed it. VS-71's 2nd Division of Lt. Morris R. Doughty, Ens. Howard N. Murphy, Lt. (jg) Charles H. Mester, and Ens. Robert A. Escher climbed above the target and rolled into a rear attack. The Japanese gunners could not prevent Doughty from igniting the right inboard engine. In deep trouble, Itō reefed the Kawanishi into a chandelle, but the other three SB4Us quickly charged in from the rear. At 9,000 feet the Type 2 shed its wings in a fiery explosion. VS-71 scored a remarkable victory against a tough, swift target.

Three documented victory flags on one Navy SB4U undoubtedly stood as a record. Since 8 August the two Wasp scouting squadrons, 71 and 72, shot down seven enemy aircraft, while a frustrated VF-71 had yet to even see an enemy plane aloft. All of these claims are substantiated by Japanese records, and Wasp's fighter pilots insisted that the SB4U pilots 'tend to their own business'!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought SB4U Viking - USS Wasp
Post by: lauhof52 on May 07, 2014, 01:26:44 PM
Thanks Logan for the nice story and the beautiful SB4U! As Always a big fan of the viking :) :)

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USMC F-14A TARPS - VMFP-3 "Eyes of the Corps"
Post by: Logan Hartke on May 08, 2014, 04:14:46 AM
Thanks, Lauhof!  I thought you'd like this one.  This is the first mid-1942 scheme with the canopy closed up.  I thought it looked appropriate given the aircraft's air-to-air kills. The backstory is an adaptation from John P. Lundstrom's fantastic book "The First Team and the Guadalcanal Campaign". I mostly just replaced "SBD" and "Dauntless" with "SB4U" and "Viking", then added context to the beginning and end of the account.

As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/V-507-F-14A-TARPS-USMC-VMFP-3-Eyes-of-the-Corps-452637698). I've also submitted this to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies etc GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4376.msg70645#msg70645).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/900px/USMCVagabond1.jpg) (http://fc00.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2014/127/0/d/v_507_f_14a_tarps___usmc_vmfp_3_eyes_of_the_corps_by_comradeloganov-d7hhlhe.png)

The United States Marine Corps was initially interested in the F-14 as an F-4 Phantom II replacement; going so far as to send officers to Fighter Squadron One Twenty-Four (VF-124) to train as instructors. The Corps' enthusiasm for the F-14 cooled, however, when development of the stores management system for ground attack munitions was not pursued. With the development of the TARPS camera pod, the Marines Corps once again looked at procuring the F-14, this time as a replacement for the aging RF-4B Phantom IIs serving with Marine Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron 3 (VMFP-3).

VMFP-3, the "Eyes of the Corps", began slowly converting to the F-14A Vagabond in 1981, but they retained a flight of RF-4Bs for operation from the USS Midway (CV-41) until 1984 when the remainder of the unit converted. Since the RF-4Bs were completely unarmed, ground attack capability was not an issue. In fact, the F-14's considerable air-to-air armament meant that it required no escort, a great improvement over the RF-4B. The F-14s were initially operated in a high visibility scheme to match the RF-4Bs, but quickly switched to a low visibility overall gray with subdued national markings.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USMC F-14A TARPS - VMFP-3 "Eyes of the Corps"
Post by: arc3371 on May 08, 2014, 06:32:28 AM
I like that
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USMC F-14A TARPS - VMFP-3 "Eyes of the Corps"
Post by: Matt Wiser on May 08, 2014, 09:44:15 AM
Good one! IRL the first two squadrons the Marines tapped for F-14s were VMFA-122 and VMFA-531. Both squadrons had people going through ground school at Miramar when the Commandant of the Corps canceled the Marine Tomcat program. They say it's a wonder the Miramar Officers' Club was still standing afterwards...
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USMC F-14A TARPS - VMFP-3 "Eyes of the Corps"
Post by: lauhof52 on May 11, 2014, 01:32:36 AM
 :) :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Photo-reconnaissance Heinkel He 100D-4/F3, Sicily
Post by: Logan Hartke on May 12, 2014, 11:40:30 PM
Thanks, guys!  Matt, we're still considering doing some for those units, but we'll see.

As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Photo-reconnaissance-Heinkel-He-100D-4-F3-Sicily-453636729).  I've also submitted this to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4394.msg70949#msg70949).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/GermanHe100D7.jpg~original) (http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/132/c/b/photo_reconnaissance_heinkel_he_100d_4_f3__sicily_by_comradeloganov-d7i30c9.png)

This profile depicts a Heinkel He 100D-4/F3 of 1. Staffel (F)/Aufkl.Gr.122 (Long range Reconnaissance Group) at Catania, Sicily, during the summer of 1942. It carries the Staffel emblem of a stylized white stork flying across a red and white symbol representing the field of view of a camera. The fairing for the Rb type aerial camera is clearly visible beneath the lower fuselage.

On 3 June, 1942, 1(F)./122 flew several He 100 recce sorties over Malta. Two He 100s were sent on separate sorties to Malta. One aircraft was to check and photograph the airfields while the other was to check for shipping in both Valetta and Marsaxlokk harbors – neither aircraft was intercepted. At the time, 1(F)./122 was under the control of Luftflotte 2 in the Mediterranean with a mixed stock of Ju 88 and He 100 aircraft – 12 on strength of which 5 were servicable.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/In%20Progress/Wing-Tanks-amp-Camera-3.jpg)

Many of you will notice the tanks and camera fairing that Talos drew up and I added to this profile.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Photo-reconnaissance Heinkel He 100D-4/F3, Sicily
Post by: lauhof52 on May 13, 2014, 03:13:36 PM
This one is really very nice. So real! :) :)

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF B-51G Night Intruder - Vietnam
Post by: Logan Hartke on May 14, 2014, 07:09:49 AM
Thanks, lauhof!

As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/USAF-Martin-B-51G-Night-Intruder-Tropic-Moon-III-453913983). I've also submitted this profile to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4398.msg71050#msg71050) where you can see the profile's progression, as well.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/B-51 Panther/900px/USAFPanther9.jpg) (http://fc00.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/133/7/1/usaf_martin_b_51g_night_intruder___tropic_moon_iii_by_comradeloganov-d7i8y9r.jpg)

The B-51G was the designation assigned to sixteen B-51Bs that were modified as night intruders for use in Vietnam under a project known as Tropic Moon. Late in 1967, three of the 3rd Bombardment Group's B-51Bs were experimentally fitted with a pod-mounted low light level television system. Operational trials with this equipment took place in Southeast Asia between December 1967 and August 1968, mostly over the Ho Chi Minh Trail. The results of the trials were sufficiently encouraging that the USAF awarded a contract to Martin and Westinghouse to modify 16 B-51Bs as night intruders under the designation B-51G.

Early in 1969, the Westinghouse sensor system was installed in a new nose section designed by Martin. The new nose contained a low light level television camera plus a forward-looking infrared (FLIR) set and a laser guidance system. This new equipment was operated by a specialist sitting in the rear cockpit. The relevant information was fed by the system operator into the pilot's cockpit so that he could select the appropriate combination of weapons to attack the target. The laser guidance system now made it possible to carry four 500-lb "smart bombs" on the exterior of the rotating bomb bay door. The modified aircraft were redesignated B-51G, and they were easily recognizable by their bulbous "chins" that contained the low light level television equipment.

The first B-51G was taken on charge by a reactivated 13th Bomb Squadron at MacDill AFB in Florida in July of 1969. The 13th Bomb Squadron deployed to Ubon in Thailand with eleven B-51Gs in September of 1970. When it arrived there, it became part of the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing. Four B-51Gs remained at MacDill AFB for conversion training with the 4424th Combat Crew Training Squadron. They went into action over the Ho Chi Minh Trail. They used laser-guided smart bombs, often achieving an accuracy of 15 feet.

Only one B-51G was lost in Southeast Asia, in a tragic midair collision at night with an O-2 Skymaster FAC over southern Laos on 12 December, 1970. Flying B-51G 53-3931 was squadron CO Lt Col Paul Pitt and WSO Lt Col Ed Buschette, who was the 13th BS's chief sensor operator. The men believed that they had been hit by anti-aircraft fire, and flying conclusion. Ejecting near Ban Vangthon, the pair spent a terrifying night on the ground within earshot of enemy troops, before being airlifted out the following day from separate hiding places.

In the event, Nail FAC O-2A 67-21428 of the 504th Tactical Air Support Group, flown by 1Lt Thomas Allen Duckett with observer Maj Owen George Skinner, failed to return to its base at Nakhon Phanom that night. The following day the mostly intact wreckage of the O-2 was found on the ground. It was reported that emergency radio contact was made with someone in the area, but neither man was ever found. It is possible that their survival radios were taken by the enemy in an attempt to 'sucker' rescue forces into the area. Both men remain listed as missing.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/B-51%20Panther/Detail/USAFPanther9.jpg) (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/loganov/media/Profiles/B-51%20Panther/Detail/USAFPanther9.jpg.html)

And here's a closeup of the new nose that I made for the B-51G variant.  It has the radar and LLTV, along with lots of little antennae on the top and bottom of the fuselage.  You can see 13th Squadron's mascot, Oscar, on the nose.  Yes, apparently the Grim Reaper's name is Oscar.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF B-51G Night Intruder - Vietnam
Post by: ChernayaAkula on May 14, 2014, 07:37:47 AM
 :-* My, that's purrty!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF B-51G Night Intruder - Vietnam
Post by: arc3371 on May 14, 2014, 07:54:51 AM
:-* My, that's purrty!

Indeed
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Bolivian Heinkel He 46G
Post by: Logan Hartke on May 15, 2014, 01:04:18 AM
Thanks, guys! And here we have another colorful and plausible Heinkel He 46G from a user I've never depicted before, the Bolivian Air Corps. I've also submitted this to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4400.msg71097#msg71097).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/BolivianHe46G1.jpg~original) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/BolivianHe46G1.jpg~original)

After the Chaco War, the air arms of both Bolivia and Paraguay were practically exhausted, not to mention the down-trodden and long-suffering ground forces. Their air arms had suffered considerably during the war and losses had been tremendous. However, although financially strapped, both nations almost immediately set about rearming should hostilities once again break out. It should be recalled that, although an Armistice had been agreed upon in 1935, an actual settlement of the war and a peace treaty were not signed until 1939.

Bolivia felt very strongly that she had "won" the war in the air, and that her forces need only be strengthened along certain very particular lines. Before the ink on the armistice agreement was even dry, circa October 1935, German sources had offered Bolivia terms on a number of Heinkel He 46 single-engined reconnaissance monoplanes.

These aircraft were delivered in overall silver dope, but some were painted with a tortoise shell green and brown scheme on their upper surfaces much like that applied to the Bolivian Ju 52/3m "Huanuni" that saw service during the Chaco War.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Bolivian Heinkel He 46G
Post by: perttime on May 18, 2014, 12:43:21 AM
Haven't dropped by here for many days... I really like the He 100, as a design, and the latest color scheme is very much to my taste.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 1: Bikini to Blizzard
Post by: Logan Hartke on May 21, 2014, 02:09:57 AM
Thanks, perttime! It was colorful, indeed. This next one's for you!

Here's another Reporter profile. This is the first profile I've done with a pinup and it works pretty well on the Widow. This is the first part of a multi-part series that will follow the "what if" history of this airframe. As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/USAF-RF-61F-Reporter-Over-Exposed-455238448). I've also submitted this profile to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4421.msg71516#msg71516) where you can see how it all came together.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/900px/USAFReporter1.jpg) (http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/140/d/7/usaf_rf_61f_reporter___over_exposed__by_comradeloganov-d7j1c8g.png)

Over Exposed! - Part 1: Bikini to Blizzard

'Over Exposed!' (44-71999) was an F-15A Reporter photo reconnaissance aircraft—hence the name—that participated in Operation Crossroads, the 1946 atomic bomb tests at Bikini Atoll in the Pacific Ocean. Photographic aircraft displayed a black square with a yellow 'F' on the vertical tail. Yellow bands were painted on the fuselage, outer wings, and, in some cases, engine nacelles of the participating aircraft, and the last three digits of the aircraft serial number were placed aft of the fuselage band. There was a very liberal use of aircraft nicknames and nose art, some comical, others more serious minded, during Operation Crossroads and 'Over Exposed' (44-71999) was no exception.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/09/Operation_Crossroads_Baker_Edit.jpg/1280px-Operation_Crossroads_Baker_Edit.jpg)

The 311th Reconnaissance Wing assigned to the Strategic Air Command on 21 March 1946, was the Army Air Forces' world-wide photographic and mapping unit. All mapping and charting agencies of the United States government were dependent on it for their area photography. From 1946 through 1949 the 311th was engaged in hundreds of separate projects. One of the most important projects of the 311th Wing in 1946 and 1947 was Operation Nanook, which consisted of the aerial mapping of parts of Greenland (Project Eardrum) and the establishment of weather stations in the Greenland area. Late in 1946 Army Air Forces aircraft began flights along the borders of the Soviet Union and its satellite states in missions known as the Peacetime Airborne Reconnaissance Program, or PARPRO. These PARPRO missions collected electronic and photographic intelligence, but their intelligence coverage was limited to peripheral regions. Before long, commanders of the new United States Air Force (USAF), formed by the National Security Act of 1947, sought permission to conduct direct overflights of Soviet territory, especially those regions in Siberia closest to Alaska.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3e/Rb-29s-alaska-2-1949.jpg)

Also at this time, under the new U.S. Air Force designation system the F-15 (F designating Photo under AAF classifications) became the RF-61 (R for reconnaissance and F for fighter). This immediately caused confusion, both because the F-15A was unarmed and was never considered a fighter, and because the F-15A was now reclassified as the RF-61A both by the USAF and in squadron records (the P-61A already existing as the earliest variant of the original 'Black Widow'). The designation of RF-61F was applied later, but by this the unit had unofficially returned to calling the aircraft the F-15A, and would continue to do so for most of their operational time with the machine.

(http://www.bz-berlin.de/multimedia/archive/00055/luftbr_cke2_55205a.jpg)

In 1948, the initiation of the Berlin Blockade by the Soviet Union increased the level of mistrust on both sides; however, the closed Soviet society made gathering intelligence about the development of new weapons very difficult and greatly concerned the US and its allies. After the Berlin Airlift began, reconnaissance forces in Europe were augmented by the dispatch of five aircraft of the 91st Strategic Reconnaissance Group to the United Kingdom, and 'Over Exposed' was among the five. In an effort to obtain information about weapons development and deployment, the USAF conducted regular routine reconnaissance missions near the Soviet land borders or just outside the 12-mile limit defining international waters. In most cases, the planes were forbidden to fly into Soviet airspace, but in a few cases the need for information outweighed the risk of overflight and a plane was sent into the Soviet Union. President Harry S. Truman soon authorized the first overflight of Soviet territory, and on 5th August 1948 a Boeing RB-29 Superfortress took-off from Ladd AFB, Alaska and, after routing over Siberia and spending over 19 hours in the air, eventually landed at Yokota AB in Japan.

Another such flight occurred on 3rd November 1948. The US Air Force had strong suspicions that the Soviets were producing large numbers of jet fighters and needed to find out for sure. Additionally, the USAF's Strategic Air Command needed to know whether Soviet long-range bombers were stationed at the northern bases on and near the Kola Peninsula. In an effort to answer these questions, Captain Landon P. Tanner and his co-pilot Captain Harry Stroud took off from RAF Scampton in Lincolnshire for a reconnaissance flight near Murmansk in the northern Soviet Union. The crew of ‘Over Exposed’ had nearly completed their tours of duty and were scheduled to return to their homes in the United States in less than a month. Waiting for 33-year-old Captain Landon P. Tanner were a wife and two daughters, Jean and Jane. The flight would take the RF-61F Reporter over Norway, Sweden, northern Finland, and ultimately the Soviet Union itself. The plane flew over numerous Soviet airfields and naval facilities conducting photographic reconnaissance of the various facilities. Soviet Air Defence Forces (PVO) fighters were spotted after being over Soviet territory for about 50 miles, but they were unable to catch the high-speed, high-altitude reconnaissance aircraft. While the PVO may not have been able to put a stop to the intruder, Murphy could.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/XF-15A-X3.jpg)

Still over Soviet territory, Capt. Tanner noticed that the left engine had started getting rough. The pilot checked all the instruments, but everything indicated normal. He turned back towards Finland, but the left engine kept getting worse and the pilot was eventually forced to feather it. When the propeller stopped, Capt. Tanner could see that one of the blades had broken at least three-fourths of the way around about a foot from the spinner and was bent slightly backwards. He put the aircraft in a shallow dive and headed straight for the Russo-Finnish border. Capt. Tanner and Capt. Stroud were now over Soviet territory, flying on one engine, losing speed, losing altitude, and had Soviet fighters closing the distance between them. As the letters on the side of the plane grimly spelled out, they were truly 'Over Exposed'.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/Detail/USAFReporter1.jpg)

And here's a closeup of the nose and corresponding nose art. This was adapted from a grainy black and white photo and was actually a pretty big pain that took me a couple of days on its own. I'm definitely no Alberto Vargas.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 1: Bikini to Blizzard
Post by: Matt Wiser on May 21, 2014, 12:31:52 PM
Nice work! And a noble effort on the nose art. The planes that flew at Bikini may have been the "hottest" aircraft in the Pacific those particular days, if you get my drift...
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 1: Bikini to Blizzard
Post by: lauhof52 on May 21, 2014, 06:48:48 PM
Very nice work!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 1: Bikini to Blizzard
Post by: apophenia on May 22, 2014, 01:58:06 AM
Very nice! And well worth the work on the pin-up. The effect is very convincing  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 2: Crossing the Finnish Line
Post by: Logan Hartke on May 25, 2014, 11:00:55 AM
Thanks, guys! Indeed, Matt, the B-29s that participated in Operation Crossroads were certainly...colorful!

And now for part 2 in the series following the "what if" history of this airframe. As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Finnish-RF-61F-Reporter-Over-Exposed-456088486). I've also submitted this profile to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4421.msg71746#msg71746) where you can see how it all came together.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/900px/FinnishReporter1.jpg~original) (http://fc07.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2014/148/e/8/finnish_rf_61f_reporter___over_exposed__by_comradeloganov-d7jjk4m.png)

Over Exposed! - Part 2: Crossing the Finnish Line

As Capt. Tanner and Capt. Stroud nursed their stricken RF-61F towards the Finnish border, the PVO aircraft could tell that it was in trouble and attempted to force it to land on Soviet territory. Even on one engine, however, the Reporter was not easy prey. Tanner jettisoned the drop tanks, and the fact that one engine was feathered seemed to streamline the plane considerably. Just as it seemed the American spy plane was boxed in, the Soviet fighters were ordered to return to base as they had crossed the Finnish border near Salla. Even so, Tanner and Stroud were not out of the woods, yet. They were still in a damaged aircraft far from any active airfield, and Lapland in the winter was far from hospitable to stranded aviators.

Once reasonably sure that they were over Finnish territory, the two men began looking for a suitable place to land. Spotting what he correctly assumed was a frozen lake, Tanner began setting up for an emergency landing. At that time, he decided to boost the power on the good right engine for a normal single engine landing, but discovered that the propeller governor was inoperative as well as the manual switches. Also during the descent the propeller had somehow worked itself down to a little less than 1,800 rpm. He realized that he would not be able to get much power out of the right engine and accordingly tried to time his turns to reach the lake in a low power glide. In order to clear the trees on approach, he planned to come in a little high. He dropped his wheels about two miles out and when he was sure of making the lake, he dropped full flaps and opened the cowl flaps to slow the plane down. As the plane touched down, Tanner turned off the ignition and battery switches, skidding to a stop on the lake surface.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/37/Finnish_troops_in_Lapland_War.jpg)

The interception of 'Over Exposed' by the Soviet fighters that had approached the Finnish border was also noticed from the ground by the Frontier Guard. They reported that the aircraft had landed somewhere to the west and patrols soon found the American plane and its crew. The Finnish Ministry for Foreign Affairs notified the American Legation of the incident and arranged for the return of the airmen. The aircraft, however, was a more complicated matter. The two countries recognized that the Soviet Union would object if the Finns merely gave the spy plane back to the United States. In an attempt to avoid an international incident, it was agreed that Finland would 'confiscate' the trespassing Reporter, but turn over the photographs that the plane took on its risky flight over the northern Russia. Additionally, the US would pass along the spares necessary for the Finnish Air Force to repair the plane and return it to flight. The trade benefitted both parties. The photographs reassured Western leaders that long-range bombers were not deployed on the Kola Peninsula. For their extraordinary aerial feat, the aircrew members each two Distinguished Flying Crosses, though the SAC commander, General Curtis LeMay, made it plain he would rather have decorated them with the Silver Star. That award, however required the approval of a board in Washington whose members were not cleared to know about the Soviet overflights.

On the Finnish side, the incident was officially recorded as merely "a high-altitude electric storm". Bringing the matter to light in the media would have been impossible in the political climate of the time. The daily newspaper Uusi Suomi nevertheless got wind of the incident and published a piece about it. The Political Section of the Ministry for Foreign Affairs immediately branded the news item as a cock and bull story. For much of the Cold War, Finland reported that they had merely purchased the RF-61F from the US for evaluation purposes, which was a complete fabrication. An Ilmavoimat team was assembled to recover the aircraft, and—despite their unfamiliarity with the type—they soon had the aircraft repaired and running. ‘Over Exposed’ had its American markings hastily painted over to obscure its origins and Finnish markings were added for its flight south. While all the aircraft numbers and USAF roundels were painted over with light gray, the recovery team could not bring themselves to paint over the pinup.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/jldz2.jpg)
Major R. Birger Ek, Ilmavoimat

The greatest challenge to getting it out of there was the aircraft’s sheer size. The RF-61F was the heaviest aircraft ever operated than the Ilmavoimat, heavier even than the massive LeO H-246s borrowed from the Germans in 1944. This was also the first tricycle landing gear aircraft operated by the Finnish Air Force, as well. A Knight of the Mannerheim Cross, Major R. Birger Ek was one of the most experienced and decorated Finnish bomber pilots of the Second World War and was at the time serving as the Finnish Military Attaché in London. Arrangements were made for Maj. Ek to get a familiarization flight in one of SAC’s remaining RF-61Fs based at RAF Scampton before getting temporarily recalled to Finland. After a few taxi runs across the surface of the frozen lake, Maj. Ek got the big plane airborne and proceeded to the Flight Test Center at Tampere. There the aircraft could also be studied by the engineers of the State Aircraft Factory (Valtion lentokonetehdas, VL). Once a few test pilots were checked out on the aircraft, Maj. Ek returned to his posting as military attaché in London. While his association with ‘Over Exposed’ ended there, RF-61F 44-71999’s career with the Finnish Air Force was just beginning.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 2: Crossing the Finnish Line
Post by: Alvis 3.1 on May 25, 2014, 12:40:26 PM
As usual, astounding artwork and a fantastic back story!

Alvis 3.1
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 2: Crossing the Finnish Line
Post by: lauhof52 on May 25, 2014, 03:17:42 PM
I second that!! :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 3: Trials at Tampere
Post by: Logan Hartke on May 26, 2014, 01:54:26 PM
Thanks, Alvis and lauhof!

We now return to Finland for the third part in the exciting history of 'Over Exposed!', RF-61F 44-71999. As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Finnish-RF-61F-Reporter-Esko-Roope-Halme-456479325). I've also submitted this profile to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4421.msg71806#msg71806) where you can see how it all came together.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/900px/FinnishReporter2.jpg) (http://fc07.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2014/148/b/3/finnish_rf_61f_reporter___esko__roope__halme_by_comradeloganov-d7jrxp9.png)

Over Exposed! - Part 3: Trials at Tampere

After the RF-61F Reporter arrived at Tampere, the black underside was repainted light blue for daylight operations and green bands were added on top of the natural metal. Additionally the black spinner was repainted yellow and an 'F' was painted on the tail. The meaning of the 'F' is unknown, but it seems likely that the letter was chosen because that's what was there when the aircraft was recovered. This is the scheme that the aircraft would wear throughout much of its testing. It was somewhat unusual for Finnish aircraft at the time but harkened back to the Swedish Gladiators of F 19 that fought for Finland during the Winter War in 1940.

The primary test pilot for these trials was Esko 'Scrooge' Halme. Halme was one of the most experienced test pilots in Finland. Having completed 49 sorties flying Blenheims with Lentorykmentti 4 (LeR 4) during the Winter War, Halme was no stranger to multi-engine aircraft, but the Reporter would prove to be a new experience for him.

(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8142/7195344690_3e67dd10e1_o.jpg)

The Nortrop RF-61F Reporter was the most modern aircraft in Finland at the time. It was the faster than the Bf 109G and had a longer range than the recently-retired Ju 88. The aircraft could easily fly from Hanko to Utsjoki and back again, so the acquisition of replacement drop tanks from the US was not a priority. Eventually, the pylons would be removed altogether for normal operations, but they remained during much of the testing phase. Pilots found the aircraft to be very large, but the tricycle landing gear made it easy to handle on the ground. Despite its size, it was as maneuverable as a fighter due to its innovative spoilerons, another first for the Finns, although the Reporter lacked the fighter brakes of the P-61 fighter variants.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 3: Trials at Tampere
Post by: GTX_Admin on May 26, 2014, 05:15:32 PM
Looking good.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 3: Trials at Tampere
Post by: apophenia on May 27, 2014, 07:15:26 AM
Yep. Amost any aircraft looks good in a Finnish scheme but the Reporter is dead sexy  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 4: Russian Treaties and Polish Vodka
Post by: Logan Hartke on May 29, 2014, 01:40:45 AM
Thanks, Greg and apophenia! What do you think of this camouflage?

Coming up next, part 4 of 'Over Exposed!', the story of RF-61F 44-71999. As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Finnish-RF-61F-Reporter-Erkki-Itavuori-457001722). I've also submitted this profile to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4421.msg71949#msg71949) where you can see how it all came together.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/900px/FinnishReporter3.jpg) (http://fc04.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2014/148/f/1/finnish_rf_61f_reporter___erkki_itavuori_by_comradeloganov-d7k34sa.png)

Over Exposed! - Part 4: Russian Treaties and Polish Vodka

The RF-61F successfully completed its trials in early 1949, the Ilmavoimat ordered the aircraft repainted in a more standard scheme of green and black over light blue. After the Finno-Soviet YYA Treaty was signed in 1948, Finland was forbidden from operating bombers with enclosed bomb bays. This forced the Finnish Air Force to either scrap their fleet of Blenheims, Do 17Zs, and Ju 88As or place them in storage. This also freed up a large number of experienced pilots and ground crew when the squadrons were stood down. One such bomber squadron was Pommituslentolaivue (PLeLv) 46, a former Do 17Z squadron that also performed mapping missions. It was redesignated Tiedustelulentolaivue (TLeLv) 46 to reflect its new dedicated reconnaissance mission, as the RF-61F carried no armament.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/Detail/FinnishReporter3.jpg~original)

Aside from its new camouflage, the RF-61F also wore the Żubrówka Bison Grass Vodka-inspired "roaring bull" emblem of PLeLv 46 and a cartoon of a RF-61F holding a camera, much like the "flying pencil" mapping emblem worn by the Do 17Zs. Finally, the aircraft was assigned the serial RP-999. The logic behind the '999' number is unclear, but it's possible that it was reference to the aircraft's USAF serial painted on the aircraft when discovered.

(http://www.virtualpilots.fi/hist/kuvat/RautavaAijo/RautavaAijo4.jpg)
Captain Itävuori, left, 22 March 1944.

The primary pilot of the Reporter during this period was Major Erkki Itävuori, a former test pilot with many combat flight hours in the Junkers Ju 88, the closest analog to the RF-61F Reporter in the Finnish Air Force. While the RF-61F was designed for two pilots, the shorter duration missions flown by the Ilmavoimat saw them carrying a navigator/observer instead of a co-pilot in most cases. During this period, TLeLv 46 continued to operate the RF-61F from Tampere since the extensive facilities there allowed them to better maintain the big, complex, one-of-a-kind airplane.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 4: Russian Treaties and Polish Vodka
Post by: apophenia on May 29, 2014, 10:57:13 AM
... What do you think of this camouflage? ...

Absolutely love it!  :-*  And your amazing backstory continues. Go Logan!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 5: A Day at the Races
Post by: Logan Hartke on May 29, 2014, 11:33:27 AM
Thanks, apophenia! Here's a more colorful one that you might like!

Part 5 of the Finnish Reporter Chronicles, 'A Day at the Races'. As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Finnish-RF-61F-Reporter-Utti-Air-Races-457079400). I've also submitted this profile to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4421.msg71996#msg71996).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/900px/FinnishReporter4.jpg) (http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2014/148/b/7/finnish_rf_61f_reporter___utti_air_races_by_comradeloganov-d7k4sq0.png)

Over Exposed! - Part 5: A Day at the Races

While assigned to TLeLv 46, RP-999 participated in the 'Mid Summer Air Festival' held at Utti Airbase in Finland on 24 June 1950. For this airshow, an air race was planned in which four Bf 109s of HLeLv 31 marked in flashy paint schemes would race around a pylon-type track. The organizers at Utti had only intended for HLeLv 31 to race, but TLeLv 46 personnel heard about the event and decided that the RF-61F could give the Bf 109Gs a run for their money. One can't attend a costume party without a costume, however, so they set about repainting the RF-61F in markings appropriate for an air race. Given its American origins and big twin-row Pratt & Whitney radial engines, the personnel of TLeLv 46 decided to paint the left boom and wing in a scheme inspired by the Gee Bee Model R racers of the 1930s.

(http://www.wwiiaircraftphotos.com/LCBW14/Me109-403f-s.jpg)

When the RF-61F made its unexpected appearance over Utti on the morning of the race, it soon became apparent that not everyone was thrilled with the newcomer's presence at the air show. The facilities at Tampere allowed TLeLv 46 to make a much neater job of the Reporter's scheme than HLeLv 31 was able to hand paint in the field on their Bf 109s. 'Over Exposed' had come to the party in costume, but had just made the faux pas of showing up the host

(http://hsfeatures.com/features04/images/lotovs38md_racer2.jpg)

In anticipation of being allowed to compete against the the 109s marked 'A' through 'D', RP-999 had an 'E' painted on the tail, but she was not allowed to participate in the race on account of 'not having registered' beforehand. After the race, however, 'Over Exposed' was allowed to do a few laps around the pylons on its own where it beat the race times set by the 109s. While the air show was a complete success, the paint used was not temporary and TLeLv 46 was soon forced to repaint the Reporter once again.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/Detail/FinnishReporter4.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 5: A Day at the Races
Post by: GTX_Admin on May 29, 2014, 04:28:37 PM
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_to_dITiFe90/SYCUVAJuEnI/AAAAAAAACUA/IL6k-WfHQ-c/s320/drooling_homer-712749.gif)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 5: A Day at the Races
Post by: lauhof52 on May 29, 2014, 07:31:26 PM
Absolutely TOP!! Logan! Story and profils are excellent!

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 5: A Day at the Races
Post by: perttime on May 30, 2014, 12:33:49 AM
Can you guess who has downloaded all the big images of 44-71999  ;D
I love them  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 6: "You're so near to Russia..."
Post by: Logan Hartke on May 31, 2014, 05:22:37 AM
Thanks, guys! I'm glad you like them! I've still got a couple more left in the story.

We now return to Finland for the exciting part 6 of 'Over Exposed!' As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Finnish-RF-61F-Reporter-Sharkmouth-457472152). I've also submitted this profile to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4421.msg72109#msg72109).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/900px/FinnishReporter5.jpg) (http://fc07.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2014/150/f/3/finnish_rf_61f_reporter____sharkmouth_by_comradeloganov-d7kd7rs.png)

Over Exposed! - Part 6: "You're so near to Russia..."

During the Cold War, Finland occupied a strategic position between two hostile blocks and was an object of interest to the superpowers as both a buffer zone and an overflight and military transit route. Both sides cultivated the potential to use tactical nuclear weapons against targets in our (i.e. Finnish) territory, at least pre-emptively. Both engaged themselves in intensive intelligence activities in Finland and in the bordering areas.

U.S. intelligence services and the United States Air Force had by 1952, if not even earlier, available sets of old aerial photographs almost complete covering the eastern and northern parts of Finland. Some of the pictures were old German ones, and some showed also the Soviet side of the border. In 1951-52, the Army intelligence service (G-2) wished to get their hands on new more detailed maps and aerial photos and directed the Military Attaché's office in Helsinki to expedite delivery from Finland. The entire Finnish coastline was photographed from above.

(http://www.maanmittauslaitos.fi/sites/default/files/1956.jpg)

In 1952, maps and photos of ditches on meadows, fields and swamps all over Finland were demanded, as well as plans of ditch development in general. The Army G-2 (intelligence) requested to be sent three copies of exact photos and maps of each specified location throughout the country. They were needed for possible war-time use and for guidance systems of missiles. Negotiations with the Finnish Mapping Service yielded results: in the 1950's, the Finns handed over to the United States at least 100,000 copies of aerial photo maps and photos of areas of which they themselves had not printed maps yet.

In return the Americans provided the Finns with good-quality photography paper (600,000 sheets sent in diplomatic pouches) and “secret” – not “top secret”, however – intelligence on the socialist countries. All was very secret, because disclosure of this arrangement would lead to difficulties with dire consequences, as G-2 wrote.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/G6910_s250_u5_index-Copy.jpg)

The Military Attaché bureau wrote to G-2 in 1952 stressing that a lot of important information had been obtained from Finns in Helsinki, but the Finnish representatives in Washington had received practically nothing in return. The flow of intelligence information would probably grow, if there were more reciprocity. G-2 agreed that Finland as a neighbor of the USSR was an important observation post. The Department of the Army agreed: there were security risks, but the profit justified them.

An important element to both sides in this exchange was Ilmavoimat's RF-61F Reporter. After three years of service and only limited spares provided by the United States, the Finnish Air Force was having difficulty keeping the aircraft operational. If the US wanted the high quality aerial photos the Reporter could take--especially along the Soviet Border--they would need to provide Finland with the spares necessary to keep 'Over Exposed' flying.

(http://www.maanmittauslaitos.fi/sites/default/files/tiedostolataukset/1943.jpg)

It was in the scheme depicted that RP-999, repainted after the air race at Utti, took many of these photos in the early 1950s. The tally marks on the rudder indicate completed photography sorties.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/Detail/FinnishReporter5.jpg)

Much of the above text comes from this much longer article on the Economist that I'd recommend to anyone interested in the period.

Finland and American intelligence - The Economist (http://www.economist.com/blogs/easternapproaches/2011/12/finland-and-american-intelligence)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 6: "You're so near to Russia..."
Post by: apophenia on May 31, 2014, 08:17:18 AM
Love the 'sharkmouth' repaint!  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 6: "You're so near to Russia..."
Post by: lauhof52 on May 31, 2014, 02:03:32 PM
Very good! :) :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 6: "You're so near to Russia..."
Post by: Geist on June 01, 2014, 07:59:37 AM
They are all great
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 7: The Silver Lining
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 01, 2014, 11:47:47 AM
Thanks, everyone! Coming up next, part 7 of 'Over Exposed!', the story of 44-71999. As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Finnish-RF-61F-Reporter-Hameen-Lsto-457674147). I've also submitted this profile to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4421.msg72221#msg72221) over at Beyond the Sprues.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/900px/FinnishReporter6.jpg) (http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/151/a/8/finnish_rf_61f_reporter___hameen_lsto_by_comradeloganov-d7khjmr.png)

Over Exposed! - Part 7: The Silver Lining

The Reporter's four year run as the fastest and most modern aircraft in the Finnish Air Force came to an end on 22 January 1953 when the first De Havilland Vampires landed at Pori airbase. These were Finland first jet aircraft and, like the RF-61F, they were of the twin-boom, tricycle land gear configuration. Despite being dethroned, the Reporter was still comparatively high performance, and its good camera suite and extreme range meant that it retained its usefulness as a reconnaissance and mapping asset.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/2278836.jpg)

Late in 1953, RP-999 delivered to Valmet for refurbishing where it was again repainted, this time in overall silver dope. In the summer of 1954, it was delivered to 1. Lsto, which became Hämeen Lennosto on 1 January 1957. It continued to operate from Tampere throughout this period. After the retirement of the last Bristol Blenheim, the National Land Survey of Finland purchased two Hunting Percival Pembroke C.Mk.53s for the geographic survey role. Operated by the Ilmavoimat, the Pembrokes were plagued by a number of technical issues with its electrical and communication systems. As a result, 'Over Exposed' continued serving in this role throughout the 1950s.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 7: The Silver Lining
Post by: lauhof52 on June 01, 2014, 01:56:57 PM
As always good work, Logan ! With a story worth to tell! :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Over Exposed! - Part 8: Going Out in Style
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 02, 2014, 01:05:13 PM
After nearly two weeks, we come to the finale in the story of 'Over Exposed!' As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Finnish-RF-61F-Reporter-Retirement-458010633). I've also submitted this profile to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4421.msg71806#msg71806).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/900px/FinnishReporter7.jpg) (http://fc01.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2014/152/b/2/finnish_rf_61f_reporter___retirement_by_comradeloganov-d7kor9l.png)

Over Exposed! - Part 8: Going Out in Style

As the 1950s came to a close, so too did the Reporter's career with the Ilmavoimat. Still serving with HämLsto, the overall silver RP-999 had acquired a helpful strip of anti-glare in front of the cockpit, a red '9' on the rudder, and larger, bordered national roundels. While the Vampire couldn't perform the reconnaissance mission and the troublesome Pembroke didn't have the Reporter's performance, the Soviet Union had a plane that could perform all the missions that the Reporter could, but with the speed of the Vampire—the Il-28. The Ilyushin Il-28 was a Russian three-seat twin-engine light bomber, and the Il-28R was its reconnaissance version.

(http://www.filatelia.fi/dx/pix/iljushin.jpg)

Finland bought four Il-28 aircraft, one bomber variant and three recon variants. All of these aircraft were equipped with cameras (with different optimization) and fitted for target towing. The first two aircraft, bomber and recon, were bought in 1959. As production of the type had ended in 1956 the aircraft were used and overhauled. The second batch consisted of two recon variants purchased in 1965. The operational base was Utti, but the aircraft were based elsewhere as necessary for the complete mapping of Finland. The Finnish aircraft type code of 'NH' may seem unusual given the aircraft manufacturer, but the designation reflected the type's origin and primary role. 'NH' stood for Neuvostoliittolainen Hinauskone, meaning Soviet Tow plane. The designation also has some humor in it. The Finnish transliteration of Nikita Khrushchev is Nikita Hruštšov, so the aircraft were called "Nikitas". The "Nikkes" were reliable aircraft with good flight characteristics, despite being heavy on the controls.

Ironically, the Finns used their Il-28Rs to spy on the neighboring "Bear" to the east, skirting the border and then drifting over when the coast seemed clear to inspect any suspicious activity on the eastern side of the fence. The local Soviet air defense command found the Finnish Beagles a persistent nuisance but never managed to shoot one down. It is interesting to wonder if the Soviets ever thought, when they sold the Il-28Rs to Finland, who besides the USSR the Finns felt they really needed to keep an eye on.

(http://www.filatelia.fi/dx/pix/formation.jpg)

Whatever the case, the Il-28's entry into service soon led to the retirement of the RP-999. By that time, the circumstances surrounding Finland's acquisition of the 'Over Exposed' was somewhat of an open secret and the RF-61F Reporter was no longer state of the art. When put on display, RP-999 was once again adorned with the nose art that she wore when the Finns originally found her. Her display markings were a combination of those from the beginning and end of her service, a fitting tribute to a long and successful career.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/Detail/FinnishReporter7.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought SB4U Viking - USS Ranger
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 04, 2014, 11:59:04 AM
As per usual with the Vikings, note that this is reduced to 33%. Click on the profile to see it on Photobucket where you can click again and see it at 100%. I've also submitted this to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies etc GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4371.msg72404#msg72404).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/USNViking13.jpg) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/USNViking13.jpg~original)

This profile depicts an SB4U-4 of Scouting 41 "Top Hats" flying off the USS Ranger during Operation Torch in November 1942. The account below (with one modification) comes from the Air Group 4 site (http://www.airgroup4.com/edens.htm).


Quote
A Few Things Remembered about Air Group 4 ([url]http://www.airgroup4.com/edens.htm[/url])
By Lloyd E. Edens

Once on board and underway, the Captain of the ship announced on the intercom that we were on our way to Casablanca to participate in the invasion of North Africa. Now if that wasn't enough to throw a scare into a greenhorn, I don't know what was. So we spent the next 4 days flying anti-sub patrols and being briefed on what we would be doing in Casablanca. We were to sink a French battleship called the Jean Bart, which was still under construction and tied to a dock. It seems the battleship was partially constructed in France, and then towed down to Casablanca to be completed about the time France fell to Germany.

([url]http://www.airgroup4.com/lloyd-e-edens-uss-ranger.jpg[/url])
Lloyd E. Edens Aboard the USS Ranger.

We were also supposed to bomb a group of about 13 German U-boats tied up to a dock. Unfortunately, we did not get them all, because a few days later the Ranger was surrounded by U-boats firing torpedoes at it. I will never forget that day. The captain had the men who were not assigned a gun station to stand on the catwalk and watch for torpedoes. Every time one was spotted someone would yell out and a guy on the intercom would relay to the bridge. The captain would then turn hard to port or starboard, depending on which side of the ship the torpedo was come from. It's hard to believe how well they were able to turn and make the torpedoes miss us. One torpedo struck the USS Augusta, but it was a dud. After a while the destroyers eliminated all of the subs and we went back to flying missions again.

([url]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/85/USS_Ranger_(CV-4)_flight_deck_Torch.jpg)[/url]
A U.S. Navy Gleaves-class destroyer passing aft of the aircraft carrier USS Ranger (CV-4) off North Africa on 8 November 1942.

The first time we came down on the Jean Bart, which was my very first combat mission, I could not believe we could get through all of the anti-aircraft fire that was thrown at us. The tracers seemed to be everywhere, and the little black puffs of smoke from the exploding shells were all around us. Amazingly enough, we didn't get shot down and we were able to drop our 1000 lb. armor piercing bombs. We bombed this battleship for 7 days, and it finally was sitting on the bottom at the dock. On the last day we were flying rather low near the battleship and some die-hard sailor was shooting at us with a 30-caliber machine gun from the deck.

([url]http://www.airgroup4.com/jean-bart-casablanca.jpg[/url])
French Battleship Jean Bart at Casablanca harbor showing the stern damage inflicted by USS Ranger planes during OPERATION TORCH.

We would fly back to the carrier about 30 miles, and reload and takeoff again. We finally ran out of targets in the harbor, so we started looking for things to shoot at. One day we spotted some German tanks and the flight leader peeled off and we all followed him as we strafed the tanks. One of the pilots got to concentrating so intensely on the tanks that he flew through the top of a Eucalyptus tree. Would you believe he flew all the way back to the Ranger and landed safely? About a month later we saw a picture of the plane sitting on the flight deck in an aviation trade magazine. The caption under it read ... "Vought Stability". The plane had part of the tree hanging on the tail section and the prop was bent.


Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought SB4U Viking - USS Ranger
Post by: lauhof52 on June 04, 2014, 03:26:41 PM
Hi Logan. Nice to see once more a Viking! Splendid job! Could you send it to me without the blue background? Would be nice.

friendly regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought SB4U Viking - USS Ranger
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 04, 2014, 10:20:16 PM
Thanks! I thought you'd like another USN Viking. Check your email.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Recon Heinkel He 100D-4/F3 Trop
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 07, 2014, 07:49:00 AM
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Photo-reconnaissance-Heinkel-He-100D-4-F3-Trop-459040324). I've also submitted this to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4394.msg72632#msg72632).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/GermanHe100D8.jpg~original) (http://fc08.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/157/3/5/photo_reconnaissance_heinkel_he_100d_4_f3_trop_by_comradeloganov-d7lats4.png)

A substantial number of Heinkel He 100D-4s went to reconnaissance units, equipped with various cameras and assigned a Rüstzustand designation based on the type of camera installed. The He 100D-4/R3 was fitted with a Zeiss Rb 50/30 camera installed vertically behind the pilot's seat. The letters in "Rb 50/30" stood for the type of role the camera was to be used. For example, Rb stood for Reihenbilder, a shortened version of the original name—Reihenbildmesskammer—series-picture, topographic camera. The first number would be the focal-length of the lens in centimetres and the second set of digits would be the film format size, again in centimetres. The Rb 50/30, therefore, was a topographic camera with 50cm (19.69 in) focal length lens and a film width 32cm (12.60 in). This camera was manufactured by Carl Zeiss G.m.b.H. and was fitted with a Tessar 50cm lens.

(http://crimso.msk.ru/Images6/MM/MM-73/0575-03-1-1.jpg)

The Rb 30 series was by far the most widely used reconnaissance camera operated by the Luftwaffe. First introduced in 1938, it was a large format camera designed mainly for task of carrying out photo-mapping work. At the beginning of the World War II, the Rb 20/30 was in general use throughout the Luftwaffe, however, as Allied aircraft slowly forced the Luftwaffe to fly at greater higher heights, the focal length of the lenses increased and the Rb 50/30 and 75/30 became more widely used. The camera was fitted with an iris shutter within the lens and when fitted with a full magazine of film (210ft) and all attachments, its approximately weight was 160lb. Using a large film format, 32cm wide perforated film, this would give a frame size of nearly one foot square. During the exposing of the imagery, the film itself was held flat within the camera by means of dynamic air pressure that was supplied by the camera motor drive.

(http://airandspace.si.edu/webimages/collections/full/A19602433000Cp02.jpg)

This particular aircraft, He 100D-4/R3 Trop, Stammkennzeichen VO+SU, served in the Mediterranean and is equipped with two 300 liter (66 gal) external wing tanks common to the R3 variant. It also has the Trop modifications which consisted of the mounts for a cockpit umbrella on the left side of the fuselage, sand filters on the wing root intakes, and the radiator fairing that fixed the radiator in the lowered position.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Recon Heinkel He 100D-4/F3 Trop
Post by: lauhof52 on June 07, 2014, 03:05:38 PM
Nice story and excellent profile! :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Recon Heinkel He 100D-4/F3 Trop
Post by: apophenia on June 08, 2014, 12:16:15 PM
Indeed! Would the He 100D-4/R3 have been unarmed or did it retain some of the He 100's fixed armament?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Recon Heinkel He 100D-4/F3 Trop
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 08, 2014, 01:06:02 PM
Thanks, guys! I was most happy with how the heavy exhaust stains turned out on this profile. I think it lends an air of authenticity to it. As for the modifications involved with the recon variants, many would be produced with armament but no radio. As with many German fighter sub-variants, however, there were many exceptions to this. Some reconnaissance aircraft their armament removed and many had a radio retrofitted to the aircraft. There were also standard fighter aircraft converted to the reconnaissance role with the addition of the camera fairing.

As such, it can often be difficult to determine the exact variant of aircraft depicted, even if the modifications are clearly visible. It's almost impossible to tell if an aircraft was built in that configuration or modified at a depot.

Obviously, this was the case with the Bf 109s and Fw 190s that I studied as the inspiration for these profiles.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - V-507 TARPS - VF-32 Swordsmen - Grenada
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 10, 2014, 06:08:28 AM
Thanks, guys! There'll be a lot of difference between the different variants of the He 100 when Talos and I are all done with them!

As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/V-507-F-14A-TARPS-VF-32-Swordsmen-Grenada-459712424). I've also submitted this to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies etc GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4321.msg72834#msg72834).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/900px/USNVagabond4.jpg~original) (http://th08.deviantart.net/fs70/PRE/f/2014/160/7/8/v_507_f_14a_tarps___vf_32_swordsmen___grenada_by_comradeloganov-d7lp8dk.png)

This profile depicts a Vought F-14A Vagabond of VF-32 'Swordsmen' as it would have appeared in October 1983 flying off the USS Independence during Operation Urgent Fury, the invasion of Grenada. BuNo 161159 is shown equipped with a TARPS reconnaissance pod on the centerline station and was crewed by Lt. Byron 'Bammer' Olson (pilot) and Lt. Randy 'Cock' Roach (RIO).

On October 18, 183, Commander John F. Manning, Jr., then skipper of Fighter Squadron (VF) 32 aboard Independence (CV-62), noticed something was amiss. The aircraft carrier and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 6 were supposed to relieve Eisenhower (CVN-69) off the coast of Lebanon. But instead of heading east across the Atlantic Ocean, the Norfolk-based flattop was sailing south toward the Caribbean. By day's end, Captain W.A. Dougherty, Indy's commanding officer, informed CVW-6 and the ship's crew that a crisis was brewing on the island of Grenada, and American naval presence was necessary in case the situation got worse.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/64/USS_Independence_%28CV-62%29_bow_view_1979.jpg/1280px-USS_Independence_%28CV-62%29_bow_view_1979.jpg)
A bow view of the aircraft carrier USS Independence (CV-62) underway.

However, before Indy reached Grenada, the political structure on the once placid island paradise deteriorated. The government was overthrown by a radical Marxist group in a bloody coup that left more than 50 people dead. Once in power, the Cuban-backed junta deported all international journalists and issued a shoot-on-sight curfew which jeopardized the safety of the isle's 1,000 Americans. On October 23, the day 241 Marine, Navy and Army personnel were killed by a car bomb in Lebanon, Cdr. Manning's operations officer told him US ground and air forces were going to rescue the Americans on Grenada. The decision to launch the operation—codenamed Urgent Fury—was made by President Ronald Reagan a few days earlier. In addition to protecting American lives, the operation was designed to thwart the formation of a communist government which would threaten Caribbean stability.

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_2ObBaAa9oeU/TTO0vgEQqOI/AAAAAAAAAqo/EKm6PmtiyKc/s1600/USMarineslandBeirut1982.jpg)

For most of the following 30 hours, the skippers of CVW-6's nine squadrons (VAs 87, 15, and 176; VFs 32 and 14; VAW-122; VAQ-131; VS-28; and HS-15) met with the battle staff officers and planned their strategy. One of the air wing's primary missions was to have A-7E Corsair IIs from VAs 15 and 87, and A-6E Intruders from VA-176 fly close air support for US Army and Marine Corps ground troops. Other CVW-6 tasks included using E-2C Hawkeyes from VAW-122 to provide constant airborne early warning protection; S-3A Vikings from VS-28 to conduct antisubmarine warfare surveillance; SH-3 Sea Kings from HS-15 to perform ASW and search and rescue operations; and F-14 Vagabonds from VFs 32 and 14 to fly photoreconnaissance missions and maintain combat air patrol.

The attack against the Calivigny military barracks on October 27 was a good example of the squadrons' integrated effectiveness. Eight A-7s from VAs 15 and 87 participated in that assault while F-14s conducted pre-strike reconnaissance. It was Urgent Fury's last serious attack mission.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1b/Grenada_barracks_before_and_after_attack_1983.jpg)
Two aerial photographs showing the Calivigny military barracks at Egmont, Grenada, before and after attacks of U.S. Navy aircraft from the aircraft carrier USS Independence (CV-62), 27 October 1983.

Calivigny military barracks was a terrorist/guerrilla warfare training camp, which Cuban forces were using to fend off attacking US troops. They put up stiff resistance until Indy's attack aircraft leveled many of the buildings with Mk 82s and Mk 20s. What buildings VAs 15 and 87 left standing were riddled with more than 7,000 20mm rounds of ammunition. The attack resulted in several large explosions and fires, which indicated some of the barracks were being used for storing ammunition. F-14s equipped with TARPS pods also conducted post-strike bomb damage assessment (BDA) missions. The photographs revealed how effective the strikes had been.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/63/Explosion2_during_Grenada_invasion_1983.JPEG/1024px-Explosion2_during_Grenada_invasion_1983.JPEG)
An explosion during the bombing of Point Calvigny, "Operation Urgent Fury", Grenada, 25 October 1983.

"We did a real nice job on that place," said Cdr. O'Brien, CO of VA-87.

Indy's F-14s also conducted nighttime reconnaissance flights over the island. Using their sophisticated radars and infared detection equipment, the F-14s were able to locate enemy targets which were later attacked by US ground troops and Indy's A-7s. In addition, VF-32's Vagabonds provided area commanders with more than 20 miles worth of high-quality photographs of Grenada which were analyzed for targeting and bomb assessment.

"They [VFs 32 and 14] also conducted 24-hour combat air patrol, just in case any suspicious air contact came too close to the carrier battle group," said Cdr O'Brien.

(http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/multimedia/archive/00287/104178170_grenada_8_287975b.jpg)

On October 29, most of the American students on Grenada were safely back in the United States praising the US military for rescuing them from possible captivity. US ground troops numbered nearly 6,000 by that time, and had secured most of the island at the cost of 19 dead, 87 wounded. The enemy, a small element of which was continuing to resist capture, had suffered about 70 dead and 396 wounded.

(http://m9.i.pbase.com/o6/19/653719/1/102038799.sQUt1odP.DFSN8311226sm.jpg)

"It was very gratifying for me as CO of VA-87 to see the CVW-6 team come together on such short notice and make a very significant contribution in Urgent Fury," said O'Brien. "Although the ground troops in Grenada deserve the most credit, we [CVW-6 and Indy] played a strong supporting role.

In an article published in Indy's newspaper, The Guardian, on November 5, 1983, Colonel J. P. Faulkner, then Commander 22nd Marine Amphibious Unit, concurred. "We [Marines] couldn't say enough about the air support Indy provided," he said. "We knew [they] were there whenever the call went out."

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9e/A-7E_over_Port_Salines_airfield_Grenada_1983.jpg)
A U.S. Navy Ling Temco Vought A-7E-4-CV Corsair II (BuNo 156807) from attack squadron VA-87 Golden Warriors in flight over Port Salines airfield, Grenada, during the U.S. invasion of Grenada (Operation Urgent Fury), on or after 25 October 1983.

According to O'Brien, Indy and CVW-6 were at their "peak" in combat readiness when they were detoured to Grenada, because both had recently finished spending several months on predeployment exercises in preparation for possible operations in Lebanon.

"As it turned out, we went to Grenada first, and that's exactly the kind of real training we needed," said Cdr. O'Brien. "They performed well in Grenada."

(http://i0.wp.com/www.defensemedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/Operation-Urgent-Fury5.jpg)

If the Grenada operation taught Cdr. O'Brien anything, it was never doubt the importance of combat readiness. "Usually before every major training exercise a squadron or ship commanding officer will say training is important because it keeps you at your peak," he said. "But sometimes those words have a hollow ring because you know you're just going on another routine training exercise. Well, our involvement in Grenada proved that combat readiness is a day-to-day necessity. The mission was totally unexpected, but [Indy and CVW-6] were ready at a moment's notice. We went down there prepared and did the job right."

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Hungarian Heinkel He 46K 'Lucifer'
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 11, 2014, 02:31:46 AM
And back to Eastern Europe for another Heinkel He 46 that's even more plausible. Click on the profile to see it on Photobucket where you can click again and see it at 100%. I've also submitted this to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4337.msg72877#msg72877).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/HungarianHe46K1.jpg~original) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%2046/HungarianHe46K1.jpg~original)

Hungary was one of the largest operators of the actual Heinkel He 46, but their version had a different powerplant. So I did one of the "G/K" in their colors. As a result, the write up on this one is going to be shorter than usual. I encourage you to read more about the real ones if you're interested.

On 10th April, 1924, with the permission of the government, the Air Office—Légügyi Hivatal - LÜH—was established within the Trade Ministry. On 16th December, 1928, Altábornagy—Lieutenant General—Vassel was appointed to a post which did not exist on paper: Inspector of the Air Force. Leadership of the LÜH fell on Doctor György Rákosi who served on the General staff as a Colonel—Vezékariezredes. Even during the period of complete concealment there were nine air squadrons forming three air group cadres in the MKHL—Magyar Királyi Honvéd Légierő—Royal Hungarian National Air Force, then under the control of the air department.

With the development of home aircraft production in mind, Dr. György Rákosi gave orders for the construction of the AVIS experimental fighters. Not only this, orders were placed the year after, 1930, for Italian aircraft imports. Orders for German aircraft imports followed in 1935. Consequently, 76 CR 32 fighters soon arrived. Thereafter 66 Junkers Ju 86K-2 bombers, 46 Heinkel He 46K-2, 5 He 45 and 18 He 70K reconnaissance planes were delivered to Hungary. Including training machines, German imports amounted to 190 aircraft.

(http://home.mit.bme.hu/~tade/ac-pict/Hung-AF/pre-1945/He46/H46p1.jpg)

This profile depicts a Heinkel He 46K-2Un of the II 'Lucifer' Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron based at Székesfehérvár during the mobilization against Slovakia in 1939. Note the crudely applied camouflage paint on the wing struts, stabilizer struts, radio aerial, spinner, and even the propeller blades themselves. Note also the Gebauer 1934.M machine gun on the observer's ring mount.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Hungarian Heinkel He 46K 'Lucifer'
Post by: GTX_Admin on June 11, 2014, 02:46:43 AM
Nice.  I hope you know that I only have one He-46 kit in the stash and you are making it hard to choose what to do with it!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Hungarian Heinkel He 46K 'Lucifer'
Post by: apophenia on June 11, 2014, 03:12:31 AM
Love those early WWII Hungarian schemes  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Hungarian Heinkel He 46K 'Lucifer'
Post by: Matt Wiser on June 11, 2014, 11:23:34 AM
Logan; nice work on the VF-32 Vagabond. You planning on an ODS bird, where somebody gets a kill or two, besides the single Mi-8 Hip VF-1 splashed?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Hungarian Heinkel He 46K 'Lucifer'
Post by: lauhof52 on June 11, 2014, 02:05:43 PM
Very nice colorscheme! Love the Hungarian one! :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Tank Concepts
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 17, 2014, 02:36:50 PM
Thanks, guys! Apophenia, the Hungarians are the only ones that that I see camouflaging propellers. Really weird. Matt, I'll definitely do an ODS bird eventually, but I'll determine the circumstances when I get there! It'll be a little ways off, though.

The following images are only mockup concepts, not finished profiles. I made them for my own reference and hadn't intended to post them anywhere, but I know there's a number of tank buffs on the forum and I thought they might be interested in the concepts.

There isn't a real backstory to these. I have a few Excel files that I update pretty regularly where I have outlined my "ideal" Table of Organization & Equipment (TOE) if I had my pick of WWII equipment. It's just a little exercise that I use to help me evaluate the relative merits and disadvantages of equipment in WWII. It also helps to understand the problem of things such as "why did Germany use so many different types of trucks?"

Anyway, to permit the interoperation of different types of equipment, I do allow myself a limited amount of equipment swapping for comparable armament, engines, radios, etc. So, here are some examples of the designs I've gone with.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/OD-IS-122.png)

The first is an IS-2 variant. It's actually pretty standard. I've extended the turret rear somewhat to give more room for ammunition and operation of the radio. I've also eliminated the machine gun at the turret rear, replaced the cupola, and added an M2 .50cal machine gun for the commander. I'd keep the original main gun, suspension, engine, etc. I'm really of the opinion that the IS-2 was one of the best tank designs of WWII. The more I study it in comparison to its contemporaries, the more I like it. Armed with the 122mm D-25T howitzer, a single battalion of this variant would serve as an integral part of late war infantry divisions.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/OD-IS-88.png)

The second is a more drastic modification. This involves the replacement of the 122mm gun with the German 88mm KwK 43 from the King Tiger. This would give the tank greater armor penetration, greater accuracy, greater rate of fire, and a greater ammunition load. This would be at the cost of barrel life and much worse high explosive content. This variant would essentially be a late-war medium/heavy tank making up nearly half the tanks in a 1945 tank division. Why bother with this variant rather than a standard IS-2? Well, a couple reasons. First is that it's more likely to engage in tank vs. tank combat compared to an infantry support tank. The second reason is that a tank division operates cut off from supplies for up to days at a time. As a result, 28 rounds is really insufficient for the deep penetration mission. Swapping out the gun for the 8.8cm KwK 43 should alleviate some of this without a reduction in anti-tank firepower.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/OD-M36E4-Firefly.png)

The next profile is a far more extensive modification, however. This is the final variant of the Sherman, which would be my standard medium tank of the war.

The initial 1942 M4A1 would be almost unchanged from the historical vehicles. I haven't given it a ton of thought, but I'd likely replace the M3 75mm gun with the 7.5cm KwK 40 from the PzKpfw IV, extend the turret bustle a little bit à la Firefly to better accommodate the longer 75mm gun and the radio, and that's about it. The standard turret is fine, the VVSS suspension is fine, and the R975 engine is fine, at least for mid-WWII.

Very soon thereafter, however, I'd switch to the M4A2 with the GM 6046 engine and the M4A3 with the Ford GAA engine. The lower silhouette of these engines would allow the switch to the lower hull height of the M10 tank destroyer. For this, imagine an M10 hull, but with the hull machine gun and thicker frontal armor of the Sherman retained. I won't bother showing a preview of this, because the forum's very own wandering engineer mocked up a very similar concept himself here (http://i1154.photobucket.com/albums/p532/wandering_engineer/M7Thomas.jpg).

By 1944, however, there are even better options available. For the armored divisions, at least, I'd adopt the torsion bar suspension of the M4A2E4 (https://worldoftanks.com/dcont/fb/imagesforarticles/chieftains_hatch/m4a2e4/m4e4frontleft.jpg). As soon as possible, I'd also switch the gun out for the British QF 17-pdr, supported in smaller numbers by howitzer armed tanks for HE firepower. I'd adapt this to the "T23 turret", eventually upgrading that to the "Jumbo" turret, again extending the turret rear to account for the 17-pdr's greater recoil. Finally, I'd increase the frontal hull armor to 102mm by 1944, also like the Jumbo. Unlike the Jumbo, however, side armor would remain the same as the standard tank in an effort to keep the overall weight down. In case anyone is wondering about all these modifications, they were all incorporated on Sherman variants at one point or another. For example, for the last year of the war, Patton had his Third Army Shermans fitted with the glacis armor plates from knocked out tanks, effectively doubling their frontal armor.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/OD-M36E4-122.png)

I mentioned earlier that the Fireflies would be supported by howitzer-armed tanks to make up for the Firefly's lack of HE firepower. Due to my choice of standard army howitzer, this gun would be the Soviet U-11 122mm howitzer. It is scaled to fit and seems to work pretty well. This would also be the standard armament for Sherman engineering tank variants.

Anyway, I thought some of the forum's tank buffs would like to see some of these concepts since the modifications really affect the appearance of the vehicles, especially the Sherman. It also emphasizes how much like a LEGO kit the Sherman was given all the different pieces they tried on it.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Tank Concepts
Post by: Old Wombat on June 17, 2014, 09:15:02 PM
Nice ideas. Slightly off-beat with the German guns fitted to Allied armour but, then, I don't know your tech tree for the background to these.

:)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Tank Concepts
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 17, 2014, 09:26:37 PM
Well, it's sort of a "best of" type list, with no limitations other than rough entry dates for equipment. Of the 4 vehicles, though, there's only 1 German gun (the 8.8cm KwK 43). The 122mm guns are Soviet and the 17-pdr is British.

My early war tank guns are Austrian and Czech, for example.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Tank Concepts
Post by: Volkodav on June 17, 2014, 09:30:02 PM
Well wasn't the famous 75mm used in the Sherman based on a French WWI field gun?  Will stand corrected if I am wrong.  It does make sense to use the best available although I do find the UKs use of 7.92mm in tanks interesting, they could have extended it further i.e. Vehicle crews Mech Inf etc. using the same calibre.  ;)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Tank Concepts
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 17, 2014, 10:05:07 PM
Yeah, but only loosely, Volkodov. The main thing was that they all used basically the same ammunition. As I remember it, during the fighting in North Africa, French 75 cases and powder were combined with the German AP rounds from the PzKpfw IV's 7.5cm KwK 37 and fired out of the M3 Grant's M2/M3 75mm guns. Interestingly, that means that the 75mm gun used on Chaffees until the 1990s used ammunition of the same dimensions as that of the original 75mm Mle 1897, nearly 100 years old.

The 7.92 caliber of the BESA also struck me as odd. As I understand it, the BESA was just a copy of the Czech ZB-53 and the RAC just never bothered to convert it, considering it to be more trouble than it was worth.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Tank Concepts
Post by: von hitchofen2 on June 17, 2014, 11:26:40 PM
The 7.92 caliber of the BESA also struck me as odd. As I understand it, the BESA was just a copy of the Czech ZB-53 and the RAC just never bothered to convert it, considering it to be more trouble than it was worth

converting it to .303 from 7.92 Mauser/.318 was viewed as too much of a logistical challenge, and didn't matter too much as the Royal Armoured Corps supply chain was entirely separate from the rest of the British Army

conveniently, captured stocks of German 7.92x57 S Patrone could be used to feed the tank BESA guns, so units rarely ran short of ammo
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Tank Concepts
Post by: dy031101 on June 17, 2014, 11:31:09 PM
I think I would steal some of your ideas somewhere down the road  :) ;D
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Tank Concepts
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 23, 2014, 01:54:11 PM
So, I've also been studying the idea of airborne armor for my "What If" TOE recently, and I came to the unsurprising conclusion that both the M22 Locust and the Tetrarch sucked. The problem is that, given the 7 ton weight limit imposed by the Hamilcar glider, how do you get much better? Well, the short answer is that it isn't easy. Seven tons isn't much to play with. Both the PzKpfw II and the T-26, for example, were around 9 tons—too heavy. Fortunately, the vehicle that I think could have been the answer to this problem was one that I'd already selected as my early war tank destroyer—the Skoda Š-I-j (successor to the Skoda Š-I-D).

(http://ftr.wot-news.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/mxM8WTc.jpg)

Now, you could use the vehicle as-is and I think it would've been superior to either the Locust or the Tetrarch. I think, however, that with a couple of modifications you could arrive at an even better vehicle. I put 7.5cm StuK 37 "Stummel" on it in place of the A9J 47mm main gun, raised the superstructure slightly, and gave it a German-style cupola. Other than that, I just swapped out the horn for a light and installed an MG 34 in place of the existing machine gun. Obviously, if you were going for Allied-only weapons, you could just as easily go for the M3 75mm howitzer and an M1919A4 or BESA.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/OD-Scaron-I-j-75mm.png)

So, what does this nifty little vehicle get you? Well, 30mm frontal armor, for one. It gives you far superior HE support than the Locust and Tetrarch. It is lighter, better protected, and smaller in every dimension. It also requires fewer crew.

What are the disadvantages? Well, it certainly couldn't carry quite as much main gun ammunition, but you could at least bum some more rounds off your airborne artillery since they share the same ammo.

(http://livefromww.files.wordpress.com/2014/06/50f74f4f656bc.jpg?w=360&h=360&crop=1)

It also lacks the turret of the other two tanks, is slower, and forces the commander to load and fire the main gun. Still, you only need to keep up with paratroopers (who are walking), you get that nice 75mm howitzer, and double the armor of the Locust or Tetrarch. I think it's a very good trade-off, personally.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Tank Concepts
Post by: Volkodav on June 23, 2014, 05:12:57 PM
Why am I now imagining a shortened Hetzer with a 6pdr?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Tank Concepts
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 23, 2014, 11:19:56 PM
It would be neat, but it would definitely be too heavy for a Hamilcar. You might be able to do something AH-IV based, but that'd basically end up with something a whole lot like an Skoda Š-I-D!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Tank Concepts
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 24, 2014, 12:51:12 AM
Here's another modification of the vehicle with a more angled front superstructure, like the Hetzer. It would still have nearly vertical sides.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/OD-Scaron-I-j-Hetz.png)

It definitely has a bit of an SdKfz 140/1 Aufklärungspanzer 38(t) mit 7.5 cm KwK37 L/24 look to it. Sort of a scaled-down version.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF EB-51E - DSES Bicentennial
Post by: Logan Hartke on August 16, 2014, 01:31:55 AM
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/USAF-Martin-EB-51E-Panther-DSES-Bicentennial-475775790).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/B-51 Panther/900px/USAFPanther10.jpg) (http://fc07.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2014/227/1/7/usaf_martin_eb_51e_panther___dses_bicentennial_by_comradeloganov-d7v9iy6.jpg)

The "what if" story below comes from Phil Peterson (philp) on the forum. The profile is a tribute to his father, who served with the 17th DSES.

Quote from: philp
Capt. Weber of the MTANG is sitting in the recliner in the Alert shed sucking on a Coke and trying to find anything on besides the Soaps when the calm is broken by the Alert siren.

He and his wing-man race to their F-106s.  The sleek, grey delta winged aircraft look fast even sitting still in the cool Montana morning.

As he straps in he gets the info.  An enemy bomber has pierced the northern defenses and is heading for SAC Headquarters at Malmstrom AFB.  His mission is simple, find the bomber and splash him before he gets near enough to drop his payload.

In just a few minutes "Astro" and his wing-man have leveled off at 30,000 and are zooming at Mach 2 towards the spot the ground controllers have indicated the bogey's last position.  As they close in he starts getting some return from his radar.  The enemy plane is low and using some active jamming.  Astro noses down in an attempt to acquire a lock on for his AIM-4 Falcon missiles when suddenly the radar signature blossoms into a huge target.  Chaff, a weapon first deployed back during WWII, has hidden the bomber from his view and combined with other jamming, it has lost the Delta Dart.

Looks like the bad guys are going to get through.  Luckily, in this case, the bad guy is an EB-51 Panther of the 17th DSES (Defense Systems Evaluation Squadron), the last Active Duty squadron flying the ECM version of the Panther.

Their role is to probe our defenses looking for weaknesses so that they can be upgraded making a successful attack that much harder should a real shooting war break out.


There's actually a lot of custom work that went into making the B-51B an "EB-51E" ECM aggressor aircraft for the 17th Defense Systems Evaluation Squadron (DSES).

You'll notice the "antlers" or "horns" on the nose and tail, the extra antenna all over, including new blade antennas and fairings on the bomb bay door, and a new chaff pod that would be on a hardpoint on the exterior of the bomb bay door.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/B-51%20Panther/Detail/17thDSESBicentennial.png) (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/loganov/media/Profiles/B-51%20Panther/Detail/17thDSESBicentennial.png.html)

Just as much work, though, were all the custom markings that I had to put on the aircraft. Most of them are in different places on my EB-51E than the were on the EB-57s, because of the configuration of the aircraft and the limitations of the profile layout. For example, the Bicentennial marking (above) that I custom made for the profile was on the chaff dispenser of the EB-57 and I put it on the engine of the EB-51E. Likewise, I move the unit markings on the right side of the tail to the left side so that they could be seen in the profile. They include the ADC badge and the Outstanding Unit ribbon with Oak Leaf cluster. Finally, the Bicenntial band on the fuselage was a neat detail that I really liked and I think helps highlight the era the aircraft served in.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF EB-51E - DSES Bicentennial
Post by: lauhof52 on August 16, 2014, 02:14:10 AM
Logan, you did an outmost good job! Very good! :-*

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF EB-51E - DSES Bicentennial
Post by: The Big Gimper on August 16, 2014, 05:31:14 AM
As always Logan, my jaw drops hard and then my orthodontist has to wire it shut again.

Could you do one with the markings of the Vermont ANG 158th Defense Systems Evaluation Group (158 DSEG) "Green Mountain Boys". Their EB-57s visited CFB Comox when I was posted there.

Carl
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF EB-51E - DSES Bicentennial
Post by: Logan Hartke on August 16, 2014, 12:59:36 PM
Thanks, Lauhof!

Carl, I was looking at doing a 158th DSEG VTANG bird somewhere down the road, but I was actually going to do one based on their B-57C dual control trainer. That close enough for you?

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF EB-51E - DSES Bicentennial
Post by: Matt Wiser on August 22, 2014, 12:17:42 PM
Nice work, Logan.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF EB-51E - DSES Bicentennial
Post by: finsrin on August 22, 2014, 02:09:24 PM
You are the master of B-51s  :)
Each of yours is a hit with me.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - V-507 - VF-143 Pukin' Dogs - AIM-54 Phoenix
Post by: Logan Hartke on August 23, 2014, 03:23:28 AM
Thanks, guys! How about another Vought V-507 Vagabond? Talos and I have finally finished those Phoenixes that we've been promising since the beginning!

As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/V-507-F-14A-VF-143-Pukin-Dogs-AIM-54A-Phoenix-477371040).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/900px/USNVagabond5.jpg~original) (http://fc07.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/234/8/6/v_507_f_14a___vf_143_pukin__dogs___aim_54a_phoenix_by_comradeloganov-d7w7puo.png)

Development of the Phoenix began in late 1960, after the U.S. Navy's projected F6D Missileer and the associated AAM-N-10 Eagle long-range interception missile had been cancelled. Hughes then started to develop a new long-range missile, designated AAM-N-11 by the Navy, together with the AN/AWG-9 FCS (Fire Control System). The new missile and FCS used technology previously tested by the AIM-47 Falcon and AN/ASG-18, respectively, in the USAF's YF-12A program. The Phoenix/AWG-9 combination was originally intended as the main armament for the F-111B, then planned to become the Navy's new air superiority fighter and long-range interceptor. In June 1963, the AAM-N-11 was redesignated as AIM-54A. Flight tests of XAIM-54A prototypes began in 1965, and the first guided interception succeeded in September 1966. While the Phoenix test program continued, the F-111B was cancelled, and the AIM-54 and AN/AWG-9 were incorporated into the new F-14 Vagabond which was to take over the role of the F-111B. The first production AIM-54A missiles were delivered in 1973, ready for deployment with the first F-14A squadron in 1974.

One of the world’s most technologically advanced tactical guided missiles, the Phoenix was the first operational radar-guided air-to-air missile that could be launched in multiple numbers against different targets from an aircraft. The Phoenix, coupled with the AWG-9 fire control system, was the heart of the F-14 Vagabond, the only aircraft that carried the Phoenix. The AWG-9 could track up to 24 targets simultaneously and launch up to six Phoenix missiles nearly simultaneously. With a range of over 100 miles, the Phoenix gave the F-14 the greatest standoff engagement capability of any fighter in the world.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/Detail/AIM-54A-Phoenix.png~original)

On April 1, 1975, after completion of F-14A Vagabond transition training, the Pukin’ Dogs permanently moved to their present home at NAS Oceana, VA. As part of CVW-6, VF-143 made its first F-14 carrier deployment aboard USS America (CV 66) from April 15 to October 25, 1976. During this Mediterranean deployment, the squadron participated in “Operation Fluid Drive,” providing CAP for the evacuation of American citizens from Beirut in 1976. In the following years the Pukin’ Dogs participated in a South Atlantic cruise (June 10 to July 19, 1977) followed shortly thereafter by a Mediterranean cruise (Sept. 29, 1977 to April 25, 1978).

The squadron adopted its current insignia in 1953, a winged black lion (or a mythical Griffin) on a blue shield. The distinctive squadron name "Pukin' Dogs" came about when the squadron commander's wife saw the creature’s droopy head and gaping mouth design. She stated, in front of the squadron pilots, that it looked like a "pukin' dog." The pilots loved that, and the name stuck.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - V-507 - VF-143 Pukin' Dogs - AIM-54 Phoenix
Post by: Matt Wiser on August 23, 2014, 07:55:43 AM
Love it!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - V-507 - VF-143 Pukin' Dogs - AIM-54 Phoenix
Post by: wandering enginner on August 24, 2014, 10:38:56 AM
Mr Hartke was kind enough to mention one of my concept tanks (M7 General Thomas), So I hope no one minds me posting a few pics of my build of said concept tank.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - P-61F - "Mrs. Bonnie" - Lt. Col. Dunham
Post by: Logan Hartke on August 29, 2014, 03:44:59 AM
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Northrop-P-61F-Mrs-Bonnie-Lt-Col-Dunham-478725040).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/900px/USAAFWidow5.jpg~original) (http://fc02.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/240/e/e/northrop_p_61f___mrs__bonnie___lt__col__dunham_by_comradeloganov-d7x0qls.png)

With little prospect of action over the Philippines by mid-1945, the P-51-equipped 348th and 35th FGs moved to their final wartime base on the tiny island of Ie Shima, off the recently-won island of Okinawa, in July 1945. The commanders of the newly-reformed Far East Air Forces (FEAF) were keen to commit the combat units of both the Fifth and Thirteenth Air Forces to action over the Japanese home islands, and were re-equipping as many squadrons as possible with the P-61F to facilitate these long-range missions. Since the 348th operated the long-range P-51D/K, the P-38 units had priority on the new Widows and the 348th would use a mix of P-51s and P-61s until the end of the war. As a result of the mixed equipment, the 348th's P-61Fs were marked with the black bands found on their Mustangs, but otherwise not seen on the twin boom fighters of the Fifth Air Force.

One 348th FG ace that would score his last victory of the war in the big Northrop fighter was veteran P-47 ace, and now group Deputy Commander, Lt Col 'Dinghy' Dunham, who had rejoined his beloved 348th FG after completing a gunnery course and a P-61F conversion course in the USA. A man of action to the end, Dunham was far from content with administrative duties back at Ie Shima while the shooting war continued, and on 1 August 1945, flying a brand new P-61F-1-NO, he led the 342nd FS CO (and five kill ace), Maj Ed Popek, and two wingmen on a sweep of the home island of Kyushu.

Approaching the southern coast of the target area at a height in excess of 16,000 ft, Dunham spotted a formation of B-24s 5000 ft below them, coming under attack by 20 Japanese fighters as they passed over Take Island. He immediately led his Widows into the fray with no particular plan except to save the American bombers. The enemy fighters were swiftly identified as Ki-84 'Franks'—the ultimate army fighter of the war, and a type rarely encountered by the 348th FG in the Philippines.

Despite the fighter's formidable reputation, 'Dinghy' Dunham had both superior speed and two years of combat experience on his side. With one good burst of cannon fire, he shattered the glass canopy of the pilot, for the Japanese fighter dived straight into the sea. This victory took Lt Col Dunham's final tally to 16, with no probables or damaged claims.

Here's a detail shot of the nose art on this profile.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/Detail/USAAFWidow5.jpg~original)

I hope you all like it!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF P-61F "Mrs. Bonnie" & IJNAF He 100 "Wade"
Post by: Logan Hartke on August 29, 2014, 10:55:50 AM
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Nakajima-A9He1-N-Wade-Floatplane-Aleutians-478801274).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/JapaneseWade2.jpg) (http://fc00.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/240/6/e/nakajima_a9he1_n_wade_floatplane___aleutians_by_comradeloganov-d7x2dfe.png)

On the 1st of November 1942, the remains of the Dai 5 Kaigun Kokutai were renamed the Dai 452 Kaigun Kokutai. At the time, the Nakajima factory produced twelve A9He1-N per month, half of which were sent to the Aleutian Islands and the other half to the Solomon Islands. On the 6th of November, six Nakajima A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane Fighters and three Type 0 Aichi E13A2 "Jake" Reconnaissance Seaplanes arrived at Attu, constituting the first operative forces of the Kokutai. The seaplanes didn't last the Japanese very long. Just two days after they were delivered, a strong storm hit, destroying several of the recently arrived seaplanes. An attack carried out on the 10th (the 9th according to Tokyo time) by Lockheed P-38 Lightnings completed the destruction of the nine machines.

On the 25th of December, the Kimikawa Maru anchored at Attu with nine Nakajima A9He1-Ns and three replacement pilots, which flew to Kiska the following day. On the 31st (Hawaii time), two patrolling A9He1-Ns claimed the defeat of a North American B-25 Mitchell and a Consolidated PBY Catalina, which dived into the sea. According to the United States, the B-25 was hit and obliged to make a sea landing, while the Catalina landed on the sea in order to collect the survivors from the bomber. Later on, an enemy attack was made. Once the alarm had been given in the Japanese base, four seaplanes took off and in the ensuing combat, the Japanese claimed two P-38 Lightnings that were accompanying the bombers and the later destruction of a PBY.

On the 1st of February 1943, the Kimikawa Maru returned to anchor at Kiska, unloading six Nakajima A9He1-Ns and an Aichi E13A2. The nine planes comprising the Dai 452 Kaigun Kokutai attacked the United States ships on the 2nd, losing two planes as a result of the anti-aircraft artillery. On the 14th (Tokyo time) two A9He1-Ns took off, one with 2nd Class Naval Pilot Sasaki and the other with 3rd Class Naval Pilot Naoi, to intercept an enemy force comprising five Consolidated B-24 Liberators and six B-25 Mitchells, protected by ten P-38 Lightnings. The Japanese reported the defeat of a P-38, while the United States claimed two "Wades" and a "Jake".

On the 18th (Hawaii time), two Curtiss P-40s brought down two A9He1-Ns, one of which was 2nd Class Pilot Yoshiichi Sasaki's plane, a veteran of the Kokutai, who had participated in the majority of the combats since the unit's arrival at the Aleutians and that had also pertained to the Tokoh Kaigun Kokutai.

When the United States secured Amchitka Island, faced with a scarcity of resources, the Japanese operations were limited to acting only when the conditions were favorable. On the 16th or 17th of March, depending on where the action was being carried out, seven Nakajima A9He1-Ns intercepted an American attack, claiming two P-38 Lightnings. This was the last aerial battle fought over Kiska.

The United States landed at Attu on the 27th of March 1943, which made it impossible for reinforcements to reach Kiska, as the maritime and aerial control was in Allied hands. The pilots who remained on Kiska were evacuated in submarines and transferred to Yokosuka, where a period of reorganization began for the Kokutai. Once the unit was equipped with aircraft and personnel, it was sent to Chishima, a base situated on Shumushu Island in the Kuriles, where it anchored on the 27th of August, 1943.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF P-61F "Mrs. Bonnie" & IJNAF He 100 "Wade"
Post by: GTX_Admin on August 29, 2014, 09:32:40 PM
 :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF P-61F "Mrs. Bonnie" & IJNAF He 100 "Wade"
Post by: lauhof52 on September 10, 2014, 02:02:18 PM
Back from holidays I saw as Always this nice stuff!! Nice work. :) :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Hans Beisswenger's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 11, 2014, 01:05:27 AM
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Hans-Beisswenger-s-Heinkel-He-100D-2-481487722).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/GermanHe100D9.jpg~original) (http://fc09.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/253/c/e/hans_beisswenger_s_heinkel_he_100d_2_by_comradeloganov-d7ynyay.jpg)

Leutnant Hans Beißwenger became a leading scorer in JG 54 while serving on the Eastern Front. II./JG 54, to which Beißwenger belonged, was the most successful Jagdgruppe during the opening phase of Hitler's invasion of the USSR. On July 5th, this Gruppe surpassed its 300th victory mark. Although Beißwenger was shot down on 17 July 1941 behind enemy lines, he escaped capture and returned to his base. The aircraft depicted in this profile, He 100D-2 'Yellow 4', was flown on 18 August by Lt. Hans Beißwenger when he claimed his 18th victory, a Soviet "I-18" fighter (MiG-3). Remarkably, Beißwenger had claimed his first victory just three months earlier on 7 April 1941, when he shot down a Yugoslav Royal Air Force Hawker Hurricane fighter during the Balkans Campaign. By the end of 1941, his total stood at 32 aerial victories. He claimed his 40th victory on 6 April 1942, on 8 May, he achieved his 50th victory, and the following day, he received the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross. On 11 August 1942, Beißwenger was appointed Staffelkapitän of 6./JG 54.

On 15 August 1942, he claimed his 75th aerial victory and his 100th on 26 September, for which he was awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves on 30 September. He became "ace in a day" on 23 August during three combat missions, when for the first time he achieved five aerial victories in one day. Beißwenger quickly rose to become one of the most successful pilots of the entire Grünherzgeschwader. On 4 September 1942, Hauptmann Dietrich Hrabak, his group commander, filed an officer efficiency report requesting a preferential promotion to Oberleutnant.

Quote
Tall, slender appearance. Very good attributes as an athlete. Open, sincere character. Decisive and mature. Good general knowledge. Officer without criticism with well-rooted, clear opinions and appropriate demeanor. Very good military personality, self-assured. Very talented as a flyer, he has excelled in action as a fighter pilot. During 449 combat flights, he has 97 kills because of his audacity. As a flight and squadron leader in the air, he demonstrated discretion and good leadership talent. He enjoys the full confidence of the other pilots.

Well-liked as a comrade and superior, and correct towards superiors. Positive as a National Socialist. Leutnant Beißwenger has applied for transfer to active duty, regular peace-time officers' list. His activation would definitely be a plus for the officer corps of the Luftwaffe.

As a squadron leader, he fulfilled his task very well and he is fully eligible for promotion to Oberleutnant.


Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Hans Beisswenger's Heinkel He 100D-2
Post by: GTX_Admin on September 11, 2014, 04:54:13 AM
Intricate scheme.  Well done.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - RAF B-51 Panther - No 138 Sqn
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 11, 2014, 01:21:48 PM
Thanks! Here's a new one with a much simpler, cleaner camo, but still quite attractive in its own right, I think.

As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/RAF-Handley-Page-Panther-B-2-138-Squadron-481630127).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/B-51%20Panther/900px/RAFPanther5.jpg~original) (http://fc00.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2014/253/e/0/raf_handley_page_panther_b_2___138_squadron_by_comradeloganov-d7yr06n.jpg)

At the beginning of 1962, C-in-C Bomber Command asked the Air Ministry to approve the modification of these aircraft for low-level operations. As a result, the Vickers Valiant's contribution to Medium Bomber Force came to an end later that same year. No 90 Sqn at Honington was switched to the flight-refueling role, and No 138 and 7 Sqns disbanded at Wittering on 1 April and 30 September, respectively.

No 138 Sqn was reformed less than two years later, receiving new Handley Page Panthers and resuming its nuclear deterrence role. With their new mounts, however, No 138 Sqn was able to perform the low level strike mission very effectively. Painted in the new camouflage scheme adopted by V Force for the low level strike mission, these squadrons operated with the US-supplied Mk 43 parachute-retarded lay-down bombs.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - RAF B-51 Panther - No 138 Sqn
Post by: lauhof52 on September 11, 2014, 04:04:00 PM
Indeed a nice scheme, top! 8)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - IJAAS Nakajima Ki-63-Ia "Haitaka"
Post by: Logan Hartke on September 13, 2014, 02:11:46 AM
Thanks lauhof! As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Japanese-Nakajima-Ki-63-Ia-Herman-Heinkel-He-100-481883561).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/JapaneseHe100D4.jpg) (http://fc00.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2014/255/9/4/japanese_nakajima_ki_63_ia_herman__heinkel_he_100__by_comradeloganov-d7ywfqh.png)

In 1938 Kawasaki gained the right to build and develop their own version of the Daimler Benz DB 601A, one of the best inline aircraft engines of the period. In April 1940 a Kawasaki team visited Daimler-Benz in Stuttgart, and returned to Japan with the blueprints for the DB 601 and a number of completed engines. Work then began on Kawasaki's own version of the engine. The result was the Ha-40, with an improved take-off power of 1,175hp and a slight reduction in weight. The first Ha-40 was completed in July 1941 and it passed its ground tests by November, entering production as the 1,100hp Army Type 2 Engine.

While work on the new engine was going on the Air Headquarters of the Imperial Japanese Army was watching the progress of the air war over Europe, where the Spitfire, Hurricane and Bf 109 dominated the fighting. All three aircraft were high-performance aircraft with inline engines, some armor, and heavy armament, very different to the lightly armed, un-armored, radial powered and slower but maneuverable fighters in Japanese service. In February 1940 the Japanese Army initiated the design of three aircraft - the Kawasaki Ki-61 light fighter, the Nakajima Ki-62 light fighter, and the Kawasaki Ki-60 heavy interceptor, each to be powered by the Ha-40. In addition, Nakajima proposed a license-built variant of the Heinkel He 100, which they were contracted to produce for the Imperial Japanese Navy as the A9He1. Nakajima's proposal was designated the Ki-63 and was intended as the backup for the Ki-60. While these Navy aircraft were powered by the Aichi Atsuta—also a copy of the DB 601—the proposed Army variant would use the Kawasaki He-40. Priority was given to the Kawasaki Ki-60 interceptor, which first flew in April 1941, while design work on the Ki-61 did not begin until December 1940.

The first prototype of the Kawasaki Ki-60 made its maiden flight in March 1941, but from the start of flight testing it became apparent that the design was seriously flawed in several key areas. The take-off run was unacceptably long, while in flight the aircraft displayed some lateral instability, excessively heavy controls and poor control response. The spinning characteristics were described as "dangerous" and the stalling speed was extremely high. Its top speed was also disappointing, far below expectations. The failure of the Ki-60 also raised doubts about Kawasaki's Ki-61, especially given its less mature state of development. Even the best estimates made it clear that it would not be faster than the He 100 that Nakajima was already gearing up to produce. As a result, Nakajima got a contract from the IJAAS to produce the Ki-63, while development of the Ki-60, Ki-61, and Ki-62 was halted.

The Army variant of the He 100 was only slightly different than the A9He1 and it was designated the Nakajima Ki-63 “Haitaka” (Sparrowhawk). In combat, initial production variants were visually indistinguishable from the Navy aircraft, so it was also referred to as the "Herman" by the Allies. Surprisingly the Army Ki-63 actually saw combat before the Navy A9He1 when an early Ki-63 test model from the training field at Mito ran into Doolittle's Tokyo Raiders on 18 April 1942. Army Lieutenant Umekawa turned to pursue one of the North American B-25 Mitchell bombers skimming across Japan at treetop level, but had to break off quickly due to low fuel and the erratic behavior of his machine guns. One of the American raiders, Captain Charles R. Greening of Hoquiam, Washington, spotted the skinny fighter over Japan and reported its presence to the USAAF after his return to safety. This sighting was correctly interpreted as an indication that Japan was importing or producing domestic models of German fighters which prepared Allied pilots for the He 100's appearance in the Pacific.

This particular profile depicts an early production Ki-63-Ia at the IJAAS Akeno Army Flying School in the spring of 1943. The pilot's initials are in Kanji above the Akeno school emblem on the rudder. Type 3 Fighter aircraft assigned to Akeno remained unpainted except for the anti-glare panel forward of the cockpit, red-brown propeller and spinner, yellow wing leading edge, and the doped fabric of the control surfaces.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Talespin - Baloo's Sea Duck
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 15, 2015, 12:21:21 PM
Well, it was a lot of work and we did our best to keep it a secret, but Talos and I managed to get it done in time. We haven't finished a new airframe since the V-507, so we're definitely proud of this one. As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Baloo-s-Conwing-L-16-Sea-Duck-Disney-s-Talespin-514048311). I've also submitted this to The Book/Movie/Game GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=5190.msg85308#msg85308) over at Beyond the Sprues.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Sea%20Duck/900px/TalespinSeaDuck1.jpg~original) (http://fc00.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2015/045/c/c/baloo_s_conwing_l_16_sea_duck___disney_s_talespin_by_comradeloganov-d8i1u7r.png)

For anyone unfamiliar with the subject of this profile, click on the link below to watch the show intro.

TaleSpin Intro Theme (http://youtu.be/CFpZSND3DYM)

The subject itself is the Conwing L-16 "Sea Duck", Baloo's personal aircraft from the 1990s Disney TV Series "TaleSpin". In the two hour pilot episode, Baloo is introduced as the owner/operator of "Baloo's Air Service" and of the Sea Duck, itself. By the end of the episode, Rebecca "Becky" Cunningham purchases both the business—which she renames "Higher for Hire"—and the Sea Duck itself. She does, however, keep Baloo on as the Sea Duck's pilot, and he continues to consider the Sea Duck "his" airplane, regardless of who happens to be in possession of the aircraft's title.

Both Talos and I loved Talespin growing up, and the Emmy Award-winning show remains as entertaining today as it was 25 years ago.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Talespin - Baloo's Sea Duck
Post by: Talos on February 15, 2015, 12:30:48 PM
And so completes a profile idea I had had years before but never had a reason to get past the initial sketching. With some creative reworking of the basic shapes, I think it came out well.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Talespin - Baloo's Sea Duck
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 15, 2015, 01:40:49 PM
And here's a detail shot that shows you the great work that Talos did on the cockpit.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Sea%20Duck/Detail/TalespinSeaDuck1.jpg~original)

And the original:

(http://www.animationsource.org/tssourcepage/images/aircraft/aircraft02/cockpit04.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Talespin - Baloo's Sea Duck
Post by: Vuk on February 15, 2015, 03:18:08 PM
Great work, Logan!  :)

Would You do some other crafts from the cartoon, like Don Carnage triplane?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Talespin - Baloo's Sea Duck
Post by: lauhof52 on February 15, 2015, 05:39:13 PM
Yes great work Logan! :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Talespin - Baloo's Sea Duck
Post by: ericr on February 15, 2015, 06:08:43 PM
great indeed!

Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Talespin - Baloo's Sea Duck
Post by: GTX_Admin on February 16, 2015, 02:49:08 AM
I've also submitted this to The Book/Movie/Game GB ([url]http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=5190.msg85308#msg85308[/url]) over at Beyond the Sprues.



 ???
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Talespin - Baloo's Sea Duck
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 16, 2015, 03:13:08 AM
Thanks everyone! I don't think Talos and I will get to any pirate fighters this decade, but I'm always hesitant to say "never" to those sorts of requests!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Talespin - Baloo's Sea Duck
Post by: taiidantomcat on February 16, 2015, 04:18:04 AM

([url]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Sea%20Duck/900px/TalespinSeaDuck1.jpg~original[/url]) ([url]http://fc00.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2015/045/c/c/baloo_s_conwing_l_16_sea_duck___disney_s_talespin_by_comradeloganov-d8i1u7r.png[/url])



(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-qgatzGNqpTU/UtfyKBKQpVI/AAAAAAAAFk8/M2PZzCqTKrU/s1600/crying-tears-of-joy-gif-i9.gif)

Loved that show, and that airplane. found some paper models, always dreamed of doing it in plastic with a nice blue PBY style scheme.

So... when can er expect some WWII style profiles?  ;)


What a pleasant surprise! great work  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Talespin - Baloo's Sea Duck
Post by: Matt Wiser on February 17, 2015, 08:57:43 AM
Interesting change of pace....never did see the show (I was already in college), but still, seeing designs from movies or TV is always good.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Pan Am Conwing L-16 Sea Duck
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 18, 2015, 04:33:31 AM
Thanks Taiidan & Matt! I'm glad you both liked it!

As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Pan-Am-Conwing-L-16-Sea-Duck-514673545). I've also submitted this to the Floaty/Ship/Naval GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=5201.msg85450#msg85450).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Sea%20Duck/900px/PanAmSeaDuck1.jpg~original) (http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2015/048/2/9/pan_am_conwing_l_16_sea_duck_by_comradeloganov-d8if8nd.png)

Procured as a replacement for Pan Am's Sikorsky S-38, the Conwing L-16 served in the airmail, feeder, and route pioneering roles as its predecessor. While it would never achieve the fame of its bigger, clipper cousins, the L-16 was a reliable, popular aircraft in Pan Am service.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Pan Am Conwing L-16 Sea Duck
Post by: lauhof52 on February 18, 2015, 04:13:37 PM
Excellent work Logan!! 8)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Pan Am Conwing L-16 Sea Duck
Post by: Vuk on February 18, 2015, 06:27:38 PM
Seems so real...  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USN Captured A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 19, 2015, 03:55:11 AM
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Captured-Nakajima-A9He1-N-Wade-Floatplane-514863235). I've also submitted this to the Floaty/Ship/Naval GB (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=5206.msg85507#msg85507).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/USNWade1l.jpg~original) (http://fc03.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2015/049/6/8/captured_nakajima_a9he1_n_wade_floatplane_by_comradeloganov-d8ijb0j.png)

This particular profile is based on a report that I've read of a captured A6M2-N Rufe that was evaluated by the USN at NAS Anacostia. I've not seen any pictures of it and don't even know if any exist. It was apparently assigned the TAICS number of 3, 4, or 5, and is reported to have to have influenced the development of the Wildcatfish. Since I had no details about what such a captured Rufe may have looked like, I took my inspiration from the famous TAICS 1, A6M2 Zero that was captured in Alaska and flown against various US aircraft types and the Wildcatfish which was painted in a very similar scheme.

(https://c2.staticflickr.com/8/7159/6838523841_f2c90be8a0.jpg)

Since details are so scarce on the actual aircraft this one is based on, I won't bother to assemble much of a backstory on it. It's likely to have been captured at Tulagi or the Aleutians. I think the Vought F4U Corsair may been the better basis for a US attempt at a similar floatplane fighter than the Grumman F4F Wildcat.

(https://travelforaircraft.files.wordpress.com/2015/01/blog-f4f-3s-sdasm-charles-danials-collection-15468728043_66f2c1a07b_o.jpg?w=600&h=337)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USN Captured A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: arc3371 on February 19, 2015, 09:53:37 AM
A very goodlooking floatplane
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USN Captured A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Matt Wiser on February 19, 2015, 10:22:28 AM
Nice work! Any more Vagabonds in the pipeline?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USN Captured A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: perttime on February 19, 2015, 03:30:50 PM
Hmmm.... did the British navy capture any?
:)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USN Captured A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Tophe on February 20, 2015, 12:30:05 AM
Your new one is also very harmonious, thanks for the enjoyment!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USN Captured A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 20, 2015, 02:12:12 AM
Thanks, guys! You'll get more Vagabonds eventually, Matt! I've had one half-finished for months now. Perttime, the Brits will end up with one at the end of the war, at least, but I don't know if they will earlier in the war or not...

I'm glad you like the twin boom Sea Duck, Tophe!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Persian V-507 Vagabond - Iran-Iraq War
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 21, 2015, 07:44:54 AM
As promised, here's a fully armed one from the Iran-Iraq War.  As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Vought-V-507-F-14A-Vagabond-Iran-Iraq-War-515361382).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/900px/IranianVagabond2.jpg~original) (http://fc00.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2015/051/5/3/vought_v_507_f_14a_vagabond___iran_iraq_war_by_comradeloganov-d8itzdy.png)

With the change of the regime in Iran, in February-April 1979, and worsening of relations to the USA, it was expected that Iran would not be able to operate its V-507s any more. Such expectations were reinforced by rumors about the US personnel sabotaging aircraft before it was forced to leave the country. By September 1980, however, the Iranian Air Force - re-named into "Islamic Republic of Iran Air Force" (IRIAF) - managed to make an increasing number of airframes operational, despite immense problems due to repeated purges of its officers, some of which were executed, others imprisoned, forced into exile or early retirement. The IRIAF survived these times and its Tomcats were to become involved in the bloody war against Iraq even before this officially began, scoring their first kill already on 9 September 1980.

Within the first six months of the war Iranian F-14s scored over 50 air-to-air victories, mainly against Iraqi MiG-21s and MiG-23s, but some also against Su-20/22s. In exchange, only a single F-14A was damaged - by debris from a MiG-21 that exploded in front of it. The war between Iraq and Iran subsequently turned into a war of attrition, with lengthy breaks - used by both sides for reorganization and resupply of their military power - between short periods of extremely bitter and bloody fighting. Eventually, by the spring of 1982 the Iranians managed to throw Iraqi troops back to the international border.

This particular V-507 shot down two Iraqi MiG-23MSs with a single AIM-54A missile on 21 July 1982 in an engagement fought halfway between Baghdad and the Iranian border after its crew ignored orders not to enter Iraqi airspace. The jet was subsequently used to destroy at least five other Iraqi fighters during the course of the war.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Persian V-507 Vagabond - Iran-Iraq War
Post by: Matt Wiser on February 21, 2015, 12:00:46 PM
Good work, Logan! Is the warload right: Four AIM-9J, two AIM-54, four AIM-7E-2?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Persian V-507 Vagabond - Iran-Iraq War
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 21, 2015, 12:29:10 PM
Thanks! That's almost right, Matt. The real Iranian F-14A Tomcats only carried AIM-9Ps and older since they never bought AIM-9Ls. In this case, though, I think Iran would've saved some money going with the V-507 instead of the Tomcat and it would need the AIM-9Ls since it didn't have the agility of the Tomcats, so I left it with the AIM-9Ls.

Now, as we both know, a real Tomcat couldn't actually carry this loadout. They'd be left with two fewer AIM-9s and that's with the external pylons.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Persian V-507 Vagabond - Iran-Iraq War
Post by: Matt Wiser on February 21, 2015, 01:47:14 PM
Actually, Iran did buy AIM-9L (for their F-16s, which were never delivered because Khomeni canceled the order), and the Ls were also never delivered. If you read the book Iran-Iraq War in the Air, or have a look at the Iranian Tomcat threads over on ACIG.org, there's mention of some AIM-9Ls making it to Iran in the 1980s. But never confirmed.....
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Persian V-507 Vagabond - Iran-Iraq War
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 21, 2015, 01:54:03 PM
Interesting. I read that they didn't buy them for the F-14s for the same reason they didn't bother getting AIM-7Fs even though they were cleared for them. The AIM-54 was always intended to be the primary weapon for their F-14s and the other missiles were secondary.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Persian V-507 Vagabond - Iran-Iraq War
Post by: Matt Wiser on February 21, 2015, 02:35:29 PM
AIM-7E-2 was specifically designed for the F-14. While the AIM-54 was going to be the primary BVR weapon, the IIAF knew that things would get up close and personal eventually.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - F-15A Reporter - "Lindbergh's Own"
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 22, 2015, 11:50:44 AM
Thanks, everyone! Glanini, that means a lot coming from you! I love your work!

As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/USAAF-F-15A-Reporter-We-Three-Maj-Noland-515645391).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Northrop%20P-61/900px/USAAFReporter3.jpg~original) (http://fc05.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2015/052/f/9/usaaf_f_15a_reporter___we_three___maj__noland_by_comradeloganov-d8j02j3.jpg)

Commanding Officer of the 110th TRS, Maj. Noland was leading his unit in the P-51K on 14 August 1945 when a number of Japanese fighters were intercepted over the Home Islands. Six enemy aircraft were claimed to have been destroyed, with three of these being credited to Noland—later assessments revised the major’s score to two kills and a probable. This action was almost certainly the last action to see victories credited to a reconnaissance unit in World War II.

(https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xfa1/v/t1.0-9/10409050_775099799211585_3006818592400792901_n.png?oh=b1f1390dd6ff747dbdc471d22de5f62c&oe=558A0CB2&__gda__=1431033988_899f866ab5c1fa69dee786c1cacf956f)

This profile was actually inspired by the 3rd BG's Olive Drab A-26 Invaders. I wanted to see what a plain, olive drab Reporter would look like and began looking for a candidate unit. The 110th TRS operated P-39s and P-40s in a similar olive drab scheme before getting their F-6Ks (P-51Ks), so they seemed like a good fit. The 110th is actually the unit that my dad served in the whole time I was growing up. It was called "Lindbergh's Own" because Charles Lindbergh had been a member of the 110th and held the rank of captain when he made his historic 1927 Trans-Atlantic solo flight.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - F-15A Reporter - "Lindbergh's Own"
Post by: Acree on February 22, 2015, 12:48:00 PM
Outstanding, Logan!  I always loved the P-61 in all its variants' and this is no exception.  Looks good in OD&Gray
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - F-15A Reporter - "Lindbergh's Own"
Post by: lauhof52 on February 22, 2015, 03:51:02 PM
Outstanding indeed!! 8)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - F-15A Reporter - "Lindbergh's Own"
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 27, 2015, 11:25:49 PM
Thanks, guys!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - F-15A Reporter - "Lindbergh's Own"
Post by: arc3371 on February 28, 2015, 02:59:03 AM
Excellent work as always
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - F-15A Reporter - "Lindbergh's Own"
Post by: apophenia on February 28, 2015, 12:50:57 PM
Yes, very nice! OD suits the F-15A to a tee  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Flying Tigers A-19A Stuka
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 13, 2015, 04:05:57 AM
As per usual with the Vikings, note that this is reduced to 33%. Click on the profile to see it on Photobucket where you can click again and see it at 100%.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/ChineseViking1.jpg) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/ChineseViking1.jpg~original)

When the creation of the "Special Air Unit" for China was authorized, the eventual plan was for there to be three air groups comprised of American volunteers.  These were to be the 1st American Volunteer Group--a fighter unit equipped with the Curtiss P-40s,the 2nd AVG--a bomber group comprised of various bomber types, and the 3rd AVG--also a fighter unit.  Only the 1st AVG would arrive in China before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor saw the plans for the other two groups canceled.  Elements of the 2nd AVG were en route to China when the program was aborted and many of its personnel and resources were diverted to Australia.  A portion of the 2nd AVG's ground crew and aircraft and a single pilot were already in the Far East, however, and many would be folded into the 1st AVG to bolster its strength.  The 2nd AVG was to consist of three squadrons of 33 bombers each, one of Douglas DB-7s (A-20s), one of Lockheed A-29 Hudsons, and the last of Vought A-19 Vikings.  As it was, only the A-19s would reach Burma, the other two types being taken on strength by the USAAF.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/81/REB-AVG-CHIT-1.jpg)

At first, the 33 crated export-standard Vought V-187 Vikings purchased by CAMCO remained at Rangoon until the AVG could figure out what to do with them since the 2nd AVG pilots were no longer coming.  Soon, though, the losses of P-40s suffered by the 1st AVG saw the decision made to use the Vikings to flesh out the three squadrons of the AVG.  Pilots would fly the type of aircraft dictated by the missions assigned to the unit.  Since the P-40s lacked any real ground attack capability, these missions were obviously given to the A-19 Vikings.  Many pilots had little trouble with the transition, often flying a P-40 one day and an A-19 the next.  In fact, this was easier than it might otherwise seem as quite a large number of the 1st AVG's pilots came from the US Navy and US Marine Corps.  Many of these naval aviators had experience flying dive bombers, often on the SB4U Viking, specifically, the naval variant of the very plane operated by the AVG.

(http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL174/1621165/4082695/50591845.jpg)

Not everything went smoothly, however.  Since these Vought V-187s were, like the Curtiss H81s, produced for export, they lacked some of the more advanced features of US aircraft.  They lacked bomb displacement gear, the reflector dive bombing sight, radios, and the later wing racks.  In fact, the AVG didn't even have reliable US bombs to arm the aircraft.  They had to use old Soviet 250 kg bombs from Chinese stocks.  These weren't the best, but they were far more reliable than the Chinese-manufactured bombs and WWI-era bombs that were being offered as alternatives.  Among the pilots with dive bombing experience were Tex Hill, Ed Rector, Tom Jones, Frank Lawlor, Lewis Bishop, Link Laughlin, Frank Schiel, and Bob Little.

(http://www.cieldegloire.com/as_usa/pilotes/avg_bishop.jpg)

This particular aircraft was flown by Lewis Bishop and can be seen with the ochre-colored Soviet bomb underneath it.  In most cases, the rear gunner was Chinese.  It is one of the aircraft assigned to 3rd Squadron "Hell's Angels" and can be seen with its own marking that tied in with the squadron, but had a unique element, as well.  Unlike the female red angels on the rest of 3rd Squadron's planes, this aircraft had artwork of a demon roaming the land, dispensing lightning and bombs to the hapless people of the world.  It was also given the distinctive shark mouth seen on P-40s, though it didn't look quite the same on these new Vikings.

(http://www.oncamouflagedwings.org/aid/hudson/chine02.jpg)

http://www.oncamouflagedwings.org/aid/hudson/mystery.htm (http://www.oncamouflagedwings.org/aid/hudson/mystery.htm)

This profile is based on the actual Lockheed Hudson's used by China and about which relatively little is known. It was the image above and the mysterious "devil" is what I found most intriguing. It's very reminiscent of the Hell's Angels used by the AVG, but the Hudson's weren't actually known to be used by the AVG. I tried to recreate that "devil" on the A-19, but styled a little more closely after the Hell's Angels. I think it turned out alright, personally. It took a lot of work to get the shark mouth looking how I wanted it to, as well.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Detail/ChineseViking1.jpg~original)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Flying Tigers A-19A Stuka
Post by: taiidantomcat on March 13, 2015, 08:11:13 AM
That really fits  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Flying Tigers A-19A Stuka
Post by: lauhof52 on March 13, 2015, 06:01:34 PM
Great Logan! Always love to see you back on track with the vikings! 8)

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Flying Tigers A-19A Stuka
Post by: apophenia on March 14, 2015, 10:51:13 AM
Love the AVG Viking Logan!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Flying Tigers A-19A Stuka
Post by: ChernayaAkula on March 15, 2015, 01:24:32 AM
Wonderful profile!  :-*
That devil looks a lot like the Lightning Demons from Diablo I.
(http://hydra-media.cursecdn.com/diablo.gamepedia.com/9/99/Red_Storm_%28Diablo_I%29.gif?version=7ec0218d3bb6ab77a86bb13f7b7117d9)(http://diablo2.diablowiki.net/images/c/c6/D1-mon-lightning-demons.jpg)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Flying Tigers A-19A Stuka
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 16, 2015, 09:49:11 AM
Thanks, guys! He kinda does, ChernayaAkula, though it wasn't intentional. Originally I had intended the feet to be more like the lightning demon in those images, but that was beyond my artistic ability.

My main inspiration was actually the nightmare fuel known as "Chernabog" from Fantasia.

(http://33.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lyzjn8iLWJ1qj5gcqo4_500.gif)

Considering the time period (Fantasia came out in 1940), that might even have been the original inspiration for the figure (minus the wings).

(http://www.oncamouflagedwings.org/aid/hudson/chine03.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Flying Tigers A-19A Stuka
Post by: upnorth on April 27, 2015, 11:58:16 PM
That's a great reworking of the Stuka.  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Flying Tigers A-19A Stuka
Post by: buzzbomb on May 02, 2015, 10:36:11 AM
Just caught up on this thread.
That Stuka revamp is really, really nice.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Flying Tigers A-19A Stuka
Post by: DaveyBoy on May 05, 2015, 02:59:55 PM
Hello Logan, I've not long joined the forum, so I've been playing catch-up with some of the threads, I'm really Impressed with your profiles and especially the stories you have put with each profile.... they so make great sense.

I'm following this now and I eagerly look forward to what ever else you bring forth.

Dave.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Flying Tigers A-19A Stuka
Post by: Geist on May 05, 2015, 08:05:34 PM
Great work, as always. ;)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought BTU-1 Vandal (Stuka)
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 03, 2015, 05:25:20 AM
Thanks, everyone! I'm glad you liked that one. Here's another one that's been in the works for a long time!

As per usual with the Vikings, note that this is reduced to 33%. Click on the profile to see it on Photobucket where you can click again and see it at 100%.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Reduced%20to%2033%20Percent/USNVandal1.jpg) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/USNVandal1.jpg~original)

The Curtiss Model 84 was declared the winner of the US Navy Bureau of Aeronautics 1938 VSB Competition, but all the designs put forward suffered from serious issues as a result of the demanding specifications. Much like they did with the XSB3U in the 1934 Competition, Vought also decided to propose a more conservative design that was a re-engined variant of an existing airframe. In this case, Vought took their SB4U design and modified it with a new cockpit, a fully enclosed turret, a new horizontal tail, and an 1,800 hp Pratt & Whitney R-2800.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1f/XSB2C-1_18Dec1940.jpg/800px-XSB2C-1_18Dec1940.jpg)
The prototype Curtiss XSB2C-1 Helldiver on its maiden flight on 18 December 1940.

While it was less technologically advanced than the VSB designs, being less streamlined and lacking an internal bomb bay, the Viking variant was smaller, lighter, and based on a proven design. This made it a good alternative to the faster and longer-ranged Curtiss XSB2C. There was no true XBTU prototype, however, just a production SB4U that Vought modified in late 1940 with an R-2800 to be the V-176 demonstrator. Suitably impressed with the performance of this aircraft and increasingly frustrated with the Curtiss XSB2C (which would suffer a major crash on 9 February 1941), the Navy awarded Vought a contract for 370 BTU-1 aircraft which were given the name "Vandal".

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-AoaXRB8K_JI/T5sXP2-yugI/AAAAAAAACZw/aZ5XiynrSa0/s1600/Jack+Delano+-+In+the+Vought-Sikorsky+Aircraft+Corporation%252C+Stratford%252C+Connecticut%252C+1940.jpg)
In the Vought-Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation, Stratford, Connecticut, 1940.

The aircraft was given a new designation (BTU - Bomber, Torpedo, Vought) and new name in part to reflect the changes to the Viking design, but also as a result of Vought lobbying with the Navy. Vought wanted to promote the aircraft as a new design to better compete with the more advanced Curtiss product. It was also fitting since the increased power made the carriage of a torpedo far more practical, but all the extra weight reduced the range, making the aircraft a less effective scout.

Since there was no true BTU prototype, the first BTU-1 Vandal was BuNo 00001, which first flew on 30 June 1942, less than a week after the first production F4U-1 took flight. Unlike many of the other new Navy aircraft entering service around this time, however, production ramped up quickly since it was a modification of the existing SB4U Viking airframe and many of the components were unchanged. The cockpit was raised to help with visibility around the new, larger R-2800 engine. A new horizontal tail was created to replace the draggy, externally braced horizontal stabilizer that was a holdover from the original Junkers Ju 87 V4 prototype purchased by Vought back in 1936.

(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-6bnpXNcR3xk/Utp8AbUONBI/AAAAAAAAWF8/H3iwzbPDPYg/s1600/Boulton+Paul+turret.JPG)
Boulton Paul 'Type A' Turret

The other major change was the addition of a power-operated turret. The problem was that the Viking had also inherited the narrow fuselage of the Ju 87, and there were few suitable turrets that were both small enough to fit the fuselage and allowed the operator to bail out quickly if necessary. Vought opted for the Boulton Paul 'Type A' Turret used on the Defiant turret fighter. The Bendix Corporation had licensed production of the turret in the United States, Boulton Paul having itself licensed the turret from the French aviation company SAMM. Bendix made a number of changes to the turret, most notably replacing the four .303 Brownings with twin .50 cals.

The combination of German airframe, American engine, and French & British turret would prove to be a fruitful one, well-suited to the US Navy's operational needs.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Vought%20Viking/Detail/USNVandal1.jpg~original)

Thanks to Talos for help with the new R-2800 prop and engine lines.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought BTU-1 Vandal (Stuka)
Post by: Old Wombat on June 03, 2015, 11:21:27 AM
That's one nice looking aeroplane, Logan (& Talos)! 8)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought BTU-1 Vandal (Stuka)
Post by: lauhof52 on June 03, 2015, 01:12:54 PM
That Vandal is absolute a hit, Logan! Very nice development on the SB4U! :) :)

regards
Lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought BTU-1 Vandal (Stuka)
Post by: GTX_Admin on June 04, 2015, 02:20:23 AM
It would be interesting to have a go building that.  We have a bit of Ju87, F6 Hellcat, F4U, BP Defiant...what else?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought BTU-1 Vandal (Stuka)
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 04, 2015, 02:56:03 AM
Thanks, Wombat!  I knew that you would like it, Lauhof! You'll like some of the late war schemes even more, I think.

It would be interesting to have a go building that.  We have a bit of Ju87, F6 Hellcat, F4U, BP Defiant...what else?

Shouldn't be any F6F Hellcat needed, the F4U Corsair should get you most of what you need. For a Stuka donor kit, I'd recommend the otherwise hideous 1/48 scale Lindberg Stuka (http://www.amazon.com/Lindberg-70508-Junkers-JU87-STUKA/dp/B000VE5H5I). Nothing on it is accurate, but it would work well as a basis for the highly modified one in my profiles, especially given it's very low price.

The Boulton-Paul turret with a couple of .50 cals and the cockpit fairing is all you'd need there. The rest should come from the F4U Corsair.

The raised canopy on this early one was inspired by the one on the Vought V-173.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/87/V-173maidenflight-1942.jpg/640px-V-173maidenflight-1942.jpg)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought BTU-1 Vandal (Stuka)
Post by: GTX_Admin on June 04, 2015, 02:59:35 AM
Oh, ok.  I mistakenly thought the cockpit canopy was derived from the F6F:

(http://www.markstyling.com/F6F_3_5_JPEGs/F6F.cu,01.jpg)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought BTU-1 Vandal (Stuka)
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 04, 2015, 03:37:00 AM
It's close enough that you could certainly use it and it would likely work just as well as anything else.

I looked at the Grumman products, but it was directly inspired by the F4U-1A with some additional bracing. I was able to justify the curved form with added bracing because of the V-173, which follows a similar line.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought BTU-1 Vandal (Stuka)
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 04, 2015, 09:20:52 AM
Alright, I'm working on a year and a half old request right now, but after that, I don't have a specific profile lined up. Is there a profile that any of you have been absolutely dying to see? Any subject I've done recently is an option.


Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought BTU-1 Vandal (Stuka)
Post by: lauhof52 on June 05, 2015, 02:17:59 AM
Alright, I'm working on a year and a half old request right now, but after that, I don't have a specific profile lined up. Is there a profile that any of you have been absolutely dying to see? Any subject I've done recently is an option.

  • Heinkel He 46G
  • Conwing L-16 Sea Duck
  • Vought SB4U Viking
  • Heinkel He 100
  • Hitachi A9He1
  • Nakajima Ki-63
  • Vought BTU Vandal
  • Northrop P-61F/F-15A Reporter
  • Martin B-51 Panther
  • Handley Page Panther B.2
  • LTV V-507 Vagabond
  • Mil Mi-24V Hind
  • Sukhoi Su-39 Frogfoot
  • AeroTAM L-239 Skorpion

Cheers,

Logan

Well as you know Logan I choose the SB4U and the BTU vandal! My favourites!
And I love to see the later schemes of the BTU!

friendly regards
Lauhof

PS: Working myself on a P-66 variant, the FV-1
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF V-507 Vagabond - 318th FIS
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 05, 2015, 02:38:11 AM
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/USAF-V-507-F-14A-318th-FIS-Green-Dragons-537450872).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/900px/USAFVagabond1.jpg~original) (http://orig01.deviantart.net/7c99/f/2015/155/2/7/usaf_v_507_f_14a___318th_fis___green_dragons_by_comradeloganov-d8vzfqw.png)

By 1975, the Convair F-106 Delta Dart was showing its age and the USAF began looking for a replacement. USAF General Daniel "Chappie" James, Jr. had just become first African American to reach the rank of four-star general, and assumed his position as commander in chief of North American Air Defense Command/Continental Air Defense Command. As the new head of NORAD, Gen. James flew a few test flights in an LTV F-14A Vagabond and loved it. LTV was offering the baseline V-507 with a few Air Force-specific modifications such as boom refueling receptacle and USAF compatible radios, and Gen. James convinced the USAF to buy some as soon as possible. Special funds were allocated for their acquisition and NORAD's new interceptors became the last aircraft purchased during FY 75.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d2/James_DanielChappie.jpg/411px-James_DanielChappie.jpg)

After passing the service's flight testing, the first aircraft were assigned to the 318th Fighter Interceptor Squadron at McChord AFB, Washington to complete the follow-on operational test and evaluation program. The new F-14As soon received the iconic compass rose on the tail to match the squadron's F-106s they replaced. The impressive endurance, radar performance, and Phoenix missile range was appreciated by NORAD and the new aircraft began to attract a lot of attention—not all of it positive.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF V-507 Vagabond - 318th FIS
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 05, 2015, 03:10:20 AM
Thanks to Talos for the gorgeous tail markings. That compass rose wasn't easy to tailor to the V-507's massive tail, but it was really worth the effort. It looks fantastic and the F-106's scheme fits the V-507 better than the F-15s that really replaced them.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/Detail/318th-FIS-Tail-Insignia.png) (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/loganov/media/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/Detail/318th-FIS-Tail-Insignia.png.html)

Also, I forgot to include this originally, but here's a version of the profile with the wing tanks and the 318th's nice arrowhead that Talos also created for this profile.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/900px/USAFVagabond1b.jpg~original)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF V-507 Vagabond - 318th FIS
Post by: dams301 on June 05, 2015, 04:56:26 AM
Arf... Still a big fan of your V-507 profiles Logan  :-*

If you have more of it, I'm interested  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought BTU-1 Vandal (Stuka)
Post by: taiidantomcat on June 05, 2015, 09:36:56 AM
Alright, I'm working on a year and a half old request right now, but after that, I don't have a specific profile lined up. Is there a profile that any of you have been absolutely dying to see? Any subject I've done recently is an option.

  • Heinkel He 46G
  • Conwing L-16 Sea Duck
  • Vought SB4U Viking
  • Heinkel He 100
  • Hitachi A9He1
  • Nakajima Ki-63
  • Vought BTU Vandal
  • Northrop P-61F/F-15A Reporter
  • Martin B-51 Panther
  • Handley Page Panther B.2
  • LTV V-507 Vagabond
  • Mil Mi-24V Hind
  • Sukhoi Su-39 Frogfoot
  • AeroTAM L-239 Skorpion

Cheers,

Logan




Conwing L-16

In WWII Colors? Namely Navy/USMC Blues?  ;) maybe some other WWII nations? RAF? Japan?


Marveling at the USAF Tomcat, Great choice of markings, that is sharp.  :-*  I like how you preserved the F-106 nose marking as well

Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF V-507 Vagabond - 318th FIS
Post by: Matt Wiser on June 05, 2015, 09:52:49 AM
Logan, how about a V-507 from the CA ANG, 144th FIW.

And an Mi-24V for the Red Dawn plus 20 timeline: one in Cuban camo but now "acquired" by the USMC. Cuban markings hastily painted over and U.S. insignia applied.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF V-507 Vagabond - 318th FIS
Post by: Talos on June 05, 2015, 11:30:17 AM
I'm really pleased with how the 318th insignia came out. Logan suggested it around lunchtime yesterday and I gathered references that afternoon and started and finished it that evening. It took a bit of fiddling to get it where I liked it. I thought I would show a little behind the scenes. This is what the framework for the drawing looked like before I took them into Photoshop to become paths.

(http://i.imgur.com/l76FNNG.jpg)

It only ended up becoming three layers, the base shape of the compass rose itself (which got colored light blue), the pinwheel looking parts that became the dark blue sections, and the white circle in the center. The last bit was placing the TAC crest.

That also reminds me, this profile is set after 1979, since that's when the FIS squadrons transferred to TAC from ADC, which is reflected in Logan's text on the profile.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF V-507 Vagabond - 318th FIS
Post by: Matt Wiser on June 05, 2015, 11:48:49 AM
Logan: what's the warload? Four AIM-7s, Four AIM-9s, and two AIM-54?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF V-507 Vagabond - 318th FIS
Post by: Talos on June 05, 2015, 11:52:57 AM
Logan: what's the warload? Four AIM-7s, Four AIM-9s, and two AIM-54?

Yes, the same mixed MIGCAP load we've been using on the USN V-507s. The other two loadouts we've done so far are 4 x AIM-9s and either 6 x AIM-54 or 6x AIM-7.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF V-507 Vagabond - 318th FIS
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 06, 2015, 02:29:06 AM
Arf... Still a big fan of your V-507 profiles Logan  :-*

If you have more of it, I'm interested  :)

Thanks! I think we're going to make you especially happy, dams301. Talos and I have plans...

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF V-507 Vagabond - 318th FIS
Post by: dams301 on June 06, 2015, 04:43:51 PM
That's a good news. Can't wait to see more  :D

When I grew up, I would make a scratch build of this aircraft...
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF V-507 Vagabond - 318th FIS
Post by: Volkodav on June 07, 2015, 10:53:57 PM
Love it and love the concept of the USAF adopting the VFX as an interceptor to replace the F-106. 

Toyed with a similar idea years ago, Grumman F-14 though.  It would have made a very interesting alt USAF and perhaps would have seen a more multi-role F-15 much earlier, a true replacement for the F-4.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - *Spoilers*
Post by: Logan Hartke on August 08, 2015, 09:14:54 AM
Belated "Thank You!" for the kind words, guys!

If the forum had spoiler tags, I'd use them here.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/2015-08-07%2020.53.42-1.jpg~original)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - *Spoilers*
Post by: elmayerle on August 08, 2015, 01:11:03 PM
A single-engine Bf-109 derivative similar to the Yak-15?  It could be an interesting inspiration for using Igor's conversion.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - *Spoilers*
Post by: perttime on August 08, 2015, 09:49:47 PM
Heinkel put a jet engine on He 100?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - *Spoilers*
Post by: Logan Hartke on August 11, 2015, 12:55:55 PM
You all may remember that Talos shared the line art for this project some time ago, (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=722.msg65336#msg65336) so I don't mind giving an actual preview of this next profile. I don't have the panel lines on this one and the canopy will likely change eventually, but it's getting there. I need to add some weathering and put a few dents in the new part, but it's coming along alright so far.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/In%20Progress/JumoPreviewReduced.jpg~original)

Anyway, it should give you some idea of what we're working on. You could probably approximate the look pretty closely with a Yak-15 and He 100 kitbash if you were so inclined.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - *Spoilers*
Post by: lauhof52 on August 11, 2015, 03:28:08 PM
Very promising Logan! Nice work already :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - *Spoilers*
Post by: elmayerle on August 11, 2015, 07:55:20 PM
Now that looks very nice, and quite promising.  I wonder if the nose from Igor's single-engine Bf109TL conversion would work?  I have several of those.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - *Spoilers*
Post by: Logan Hartke on August 11, 2015, 10:12:21 PM
I wonder if the nose from Igor's single-engine Bf109TL conversion would work?  I have several of those.

I don't see why not.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - *Spoilers*
Post by: Tophe on August 11, 2015, 11:12:34 PM
 :-* Marvelous! Thanks!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - *Spoilers*
Post by: M.A.D on September 15, 2015, 07:43:54 PM
You all may remember that Talos shared the line art for this project some time ago, ([url]http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=722.msg65336#msg65336[/url]) so I don't mind giving an actual preview of this next profile. I don't have the panel lines on this one and the canopy will likely change eventually, but it's getting there. I need to add some weathering and put a few dents in the new part, but it's coming along alright so far.

([url]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/In%20Progress/JumoPreviewReduced.jpg~original[/url])

Anyway, it should give you some idea of what we're working on. You could probably approximate the look pretty closely with a Yak-15 and He 100 kitbash if you were so inclined.

Cheers,

Logan


Interesting Logan, and yet seems such a natural progression for a simple jet fighter for the closing years of the Reich's Luftwaffe!

M.A.D
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - *Spoilers*
Post by: Nexus1171 on October 18, 2015, 08:56:39 AM
I'm not sure if you do requests but I was thinking if you have any interest in the following

WWII Era

P-61 / F-15 Reporter Hybrid
Concept: P-61 without the gunner, the radar operator behind the pilot, and the XP-61E/XF-15 Reporter's aft fuselage
Purpose: Looks cooler, and is more practical as the P-61 never needed a turret-operator in practice (plus, the gunner wasn't even fitted always)
Other: Since bubble canopies weren't always used, a canopy configuration something like the A6M, or early Hawker Typhoon, or Grumman XF5F-5, which used metal bracing and multiple window-panels to provide the canopy shape would definitely suffice.

P-65 Tigercat
Concept: F7F-3 in USAAF colors
Purpose: Would have been awesome in USAAF service


Post-War Era

F8U-3 Crusader III
Concept: F8U-3 in USN colors
Purpose: The F8U-3 was a better performer than the F-4 in agility and speed and it looked WAY cooler
Other: It was possible to carry a gun-pack in the rear-fuselage if the need for a gun came into play...


Even if you do take any requests: I don't expect anybody to do all of them, I'd be mostly happy if *any* were done.  It's hard work to make drawings like yours.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - *Spoilers*
Post by: Logan Hartke on October 21, 2015, 02:42:16 AM
A night fighter variant of the P-61F has been planned for some time, and if I can ever discover some free time lying around my house, again, I may actually get to it.

I think the Tigercat is neat, but there are USAAF Tigercats scattered around the internet, already, so that's not something I'd do.

As far as the F8U-3 goes, you might see a full profile set from Talos one of these days, but not me. He likes it, but I find the Crusader III to be absolutely hideous and refuse to do a profile of it. Ugly as sin. No me gusta.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - *Spoilers*
Post by: Nexus1171 on October 21, 2015, 09:38:49 AM
Logan

Quote
A night fighter variant of the P-61F has been planned for some time, and if I can ever discover some free time lying around my house, again, I may actually get to it.
Sounds great

Quote
I think the Tigercat is neat, but there are USAAF Tigercats scattered around the internet, already, so that's not something I'd do.
Okay
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - *Spoilers*
Post by: M.A.D on November 06, 2015, 09:42:17 AM
Quote
I find the Crusader III to be absolutely hideous and refuse to do a profile of it. Ugly as sin

Ha ha  ;D
That's funny Logan


Regards
Pioneer
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - *Spoilers*
Post by: Weaver on November 06, 2015, 10:20:09 AM
I like the jet He-100. Somewhere in the depths of my to-do list is a Spanish Nationalist one, from a timeline where the Spanish Civil War gets stalemated and the two sides are two de-facto separate countries until the early 1990s. Franco's Fascist Spain isn't getting a whole lot of love post WWII, but it's also providing a haven for German scientists and engineers, some of whom help them jetify the He-100s they bought pre-war and manufactured under licence.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aussie Frog...foots? feet?
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 08, 2016, 03:14:05 PM
Wow, first new art in my thread in 7 months and first completed profile in 9 months. That is shameful. I don't even have a convenient 9 month excuse like a new tiny human, either. I just lost inspiration during the latter half of the year, then life events ate up a lot of my time, followed by increased work responsibilities. Now, though, things are a little quieter and I had a nice softball of a request from MAD to get me back into the swing of things.

I'll let MAD cover the details of the backstory, but his request was for two AeroTAM L-239 Skorpions: one in ‘RAAF two-tone grey’, and the other in the ‘three-tone camouflage used by the Australian Army on its helicopter fleet (as seen on my Australian Army ‘Mil Mi-24V ‘Hind’ profile). With that as about all the direction I had, I set about trying to meet the request. In this case, the most difficult part of the profiles was picking the right squadrons to operate the units. I won't go into the details of why I felt 12 and 13 Sqns were the most suitable, but there were a lot of factors that went into the decision.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Frogfoot/900px/AustralianSkorpion1.jpg~original) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Frogfoot/AustralianSkorpion1.jpg~original)

So, with this one, I was fortunate enough to find out that I'd already mounted ASRAAMs on the Indian Navy Skorpion profile that I did years ago. Why did I put ASRAAMs on the Indian Navy L-239 Skorpion? Haven't the foggiest. It was back in 2009, five years before the Indian Air Force signed a deal for them. Weirdly, the layer in that old profile is called "Magic", but the source image I imported it from is clearly called ASRAAM. They don't look anything alike, so I doubt I'd try to pass it off as a Magic. I really don't know. Regardless, I was happy to see that I had the ASRAAM already made up and ready to go. I told MAD that I wasn't going to be adding new ordnance for these profiles (although I did, anyway), so I didn't think he'd be getting the ASRAAMs he wanted. Since it was already done by me 7 years ago, I didn't have to do anything new. Add some drop tanks, HARMs, & JDAMs and call it a day, right? Well, not quite.

Just the gray scheme on the aircraft was boring by itself and the Hawk 127s that inspired this scheme had really pretty full color markings on the tail. But it would be lazy (and wouldn't make sense) to give the Skorpions to one of the Hawk or Hornet units. It's not like the RAAF has a lot of active squadrons to spare, or any combat squadrons that are in dire need of new equipment (that hasn't already been earmarked). That's alright, there's sure to be disbanded squadrons that I could use, or at least active ones that no longer fly aircraft. Once I picked one, I could figure out what markings to put on the tail. Well, I picked 13 Sqn (I had already selected 12 Sqn for the next profile), but there's just one problem: their unit markings are boring.

(http://www.diggerhistory.info/images/raaf-sqns/13sqn.jpg)

A compass rose and...horns? What am I even looking at? Should I care? What's their motto? "Resilient and Ready"? Snore. At least it reflects its current boring role of "Base Operations and Training". It's so boring that even the link to the squadron's website is broken. It wasn't always so boring, though. In WWII, they flew Hudsons, Beauforts, and Venturas. They also had this really cool unofficial squadron badge (although it is way too busy and ugly). Their unofficial WWII motto was also great! Yeah, I'm totally nicking that for the re-formed combat unit.

(http://www.adastron.com/lockheed/ventura/13sqnjpg.jpg)

Still, I've found two badges for the squadron, and they're both ugly and terrible. But, there was this...

(http://militaria-sales.com.au/images/AM02806.jpg)

An unofficial unit patch made up, well...I don't know. In fact, I know basically nothing about it other than it was unofficial and for 13 Sqn RAAF. I have no idea of timeframe (80s, 90s, early 2000s?), origin or use, but at least it looks cool, so I'll nick that, too. Rework it for the tail, come up with a ribbon for it on the tail, redo the font, and call this one done.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Frogfoot/Detail/AustralianSkorpion1_detail.jpg~original) (http://img.photobucket.com/user/loganov/media/Profiles/Frogfoot/Detail/AustralianSkorpion1_detail.jpg~original)

Now, on to the next one. This is the camo that I loved from back when I did the Australian Army Mi-24V Hind (http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view;id=1826) eight (eight!?!? geez...) years ago. I still think it's one of the world's best looking camo schemes in the world.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Mi-24%20Hind/900px/AussieHind1Small.jpg~original) (http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php?action=gallery;sa=view;id=1826)

I still like the way this one looks, but the details do bug me. The colors are a bit more attractive, but they're not totally correct. I probably just eyeballed them. So, I went looking for a little more accurate, more official values. I found some online with nice FS values. I plugged those in and...didn't much like the results. They looked too dark to me. I thought my old 2008 eyeball ones were a lot pretties and semed to look more like the pictures to me in certain lighting conditions, but were probably too bright. So, I split the difference and was actually pretty happy with the result. That's what I ended up using on the second Australian Frogfoot.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Scrapbook/RAAF-Army.jpg)

The paint scheme is actually from the old Australian Army GAF Nomad. Well, actually, most Nomads had a completely different, far more complex paint scheme consisting of the same colors, but a lot smaller bands. It's attractive, but "ain't nobody got time for that". I also doubt anyone in the RAAF would go to that sort of trouble painting and doing the upkeep on a fleet of aircraft with that sort of scheme today. It doesn't even fit in with the current Australian Army helicopter's fleet scheme, either, as you can see here:

(http://www.adf-gallery.com.au/gallery/albums/Nomad-A18-313/Nomad_A18_313_Oakey_1991_Photo_Doug_Mackay.jpg)

It's pretty, just really busy, really complicated, and doesn't really match the other aircraft flown by the Australian Army in those colors. One Nomad, though, dared to be different. A18-309 wasn't painted like the rest of the Nomad fleet. Ironically, in being different, it was a lot more similar to the helicopters it operated with. I quite liked it and I adapted that scheme to the Frogfoot, roughly.

(http://www.adf-gallery.com.au/gallery/albums/Nomad-A18-309/Nomad_A18_309_Sydney_November_1982_Photo_by_Grahame_Hutchison.jpg)

In most cases, the underside of the wings and horizontal tail were left in just tan and not camouflaged. I also had a few detail markings that I took from other aircraft, too. I took the style of unit marking on the tail from this old RAAF Caribou...

(http://www.16right.com/MessageBoard/Military/RAAF%20DHC-4%20Caribou%20A4-210%2019881014.jpg)

...but the actual marking itself is the old 12 Sqn marking found on the unit's badge and on the tail of their Chinooks, before the ADF decided it didn't need Chinooks anymore, which was before they decided they needed Chinooks again, which was before the most recent decision to get more Chinooks. In fairness to the ADF, the Canadians had the same "Baby Come Back" moment with the Chinook. "I was wrong, and I just can't live without you." So, I just low-vis'ed the marking and slapped it in the low-vis band from the Caribou. Finally, there's a detail on the nose that you might miss if I don't mention it. That's the name "Dianne". It's subtle, but it's a reference to the old 12 Sqn Vengeances that they flew in WWII.

(http://home.vicnet.net.au/~maav/vulteelightbox/data/images/vult1.jpg)

It's not without precedent, either, as the ADF's Blackhawks carry a name above the cockpit. They look good, too, except that the font looks like Comic Sans. No, not on my profile. We'll use the original, classy script from the Vultee Vengeance A27-209.

(http://www.adf-gallery.com.au/gallery/albums/Blackhawk-A25-222/IMG_2783.jpg)

That's got to be about it, right? Almost. The drop tank paint scheme also came from the Blackhawk, and I went with more of a CAS loadout here, since it would naturally be supporting ground forces in that paint scheme. Give it LGBs, Mavericks, ASRAAMs, and rocket pods. Normally, I just stick with the B-8M1 rocket pods that I already had for the Su-39 and hand wave it away, but I didn't feel like that would do here. I took a couple of anachronistic 2.75 inch rocket pods (LAU-3, if I recall correctly) and mocked up a crude TER to mount them on. Given how simple rocket pods are and how low of a resolution these eight year old Frogfoot profiles are, I thought it turned out just fine. I sure can't spot the differences between these and newer rocket pods at that size. They look more plausible than the B-8M1s, that's for sure.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Frogfoot/900px/AustralianSkorpion2.jpg~original) (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Frogfoot/AustralianSkorpion2.jpg)

Anyway, I hope you all like them. You can see what all goes into just the thought process behind all the details that go into each profile that many people would never even notice at a glance. I agonize way too long over all of these details, so you can see why each profile can take so long. I didn't even go into the hours of research that I put into studying the candidate squadrons for these and why I ruled out all the other potential squadrons for one reason or another.

By the way, I just wanted to give a shout out to the ADF Serials (http://www.adf-gallery.com.au/) website. What a fanstastic site! I've been using it for years, but I wanted to make sure other people knew about it. It really is fantastic.

(http://www.adf-serials.com.au/adf-serials.png) (http://www.adf-gallery.com.au/)

Again, though, what is it with the ADF and Comic Sans? I can't seem to get away from it.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aussie Frog...foots? feet?
Post by: Old Wombat on March 08, 2016, 05:34:19 PM
'Coz the ADF, despite its many good qualities, knows its miniscule size makes it a bit of a joke in the greater scheme of things? ???
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aussie Frog...foots? feet?
Post by: Tophe on March 09, 2016, 02:11:50 AM
Great profiles, as usual...
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aussie Frog...foots? feet?
Post by: lauhof52 on March 10, 2016, 04:08:50 AM
Nice to have you back on track, Logan. Great profils!

regards
lauhof
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aussie Frog...foots? feet?
Post by: Matt Wiser on March 10, 2016, 12:12:21 PM
Glad to see you back at work, Logan. Nice job!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aussie Frog...foots? feet?
Post by: GTX_Admin on March 11, 2016, 02:13:34 AM
'Coz the ADF, despite its many good qualities, knows its miniscule size makes it a bit of a joke in the greater scheme of things? ???

You might be surprised...
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aussie Frog...foots? feet?
Post by: apophenia on March 13, 2016, 04:21:25 AM
Gorgeous Logan ... and love all the background you've provided  :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aéronavale Vought F-14A Vagabond
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 19, 2016, 01:12:30 PM
Thanks, everyone! It's nice to be back at it! Here's one I've been planning for a while:

As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page (http://comradeloganov.deviantart.com/art/Aeronavale-V-507-F-14A-Vagabond-Flottille-14F-597488029). I've also submitted this to The Cold War GB (http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,42006.msg722027.html#msg722027) over at the What If forum.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/V-507%20Vagabond/1080px/FrenchVagabond1.jpg~original) (http://orig07.deviantart.net/229e/f/2016/078/1/0/aeronavale_v_507_f_14a_vagabond___flottille_14f_by_comradeloganov-d9vq8pp.png)

A great deal of myth surrounds the Aéronavale use of the Vought V-507 Vagabond, much of it the fault of the French Navy itself. The Aéronavale wasn’t confused about the aircraft's intended role, but they would often give misleading statements about the aircraft's roles and capabilities to press or politicians that may not have understood the need for the aircraft the same way the Marine Nationale did.

Probably the most common myth about the aircraft is that France originally ordered them for use on their aircraft carriers. Often, this is related in a humorous fashion to poke fun at France, suggesting that they ordered the aircraft only to find out after they were too big to fit in the aircraft carriers’ hangars. In fact, there is no evidence that the French Navy ever seriously investigated modifying either ship for their operation, either. The F-14 was always going to be too heavy to be launched or recovered from either the Clemenceau or Foch. The extent of modifications necessary would likely have made them impractical on an aircraft carrier of such a small tonnage. It doesn’t even seem as though much consideration was given to making the replacement aircraft carrier class capable of operating aircraft in the Vagabond’s weight class, either. There was a short time after the end of the Cold War where France briefly considered acquiring a Forrestal-class carrier from the United States, but the costs associated with refitting and operating carriers of that size quickly ruled this out.

(http://img.bemil.chosun.com/nbrd/data/10044/upfile/201409/thumb2/20140908001600.jpg)

Another misconception regarding the Vagabond is the claim that the French Navy intended to exchange their Vagabond squadrons for US Navy Hornet squadrons on its own carriers in the event of war. While the commonality of French and US carrier equipment meant that this was a theoretical possibility, neither country had a formal plan for such an exchange nor was there specific provision made for the operation of Hornets from the French carriers. In fact, the French Navy began evaluating the F-18 as early as 1976, before purchasing LTV’s V-507. Had the French Navy intended to swap aircraft with the United States, then it would seem logical to have merely purchased the Hornet at the outset instead of the Vagabond.

(http://www.ffaa.net/projects/hornet/images/hornet-0001.jpg)

Other myths about the Aéronavale’s Vagabonds include those that fall into the category of the purchase being primarily motivated by some rivalry with the Armée de l'Air, the Royal Navy, or some other service. While politics always plays a factor in any large defense contract, the acquisition of the Vagabond was largely driven by external threats. A variation on this theme is that the V-507 was either a response to a failed attempt by Dassault to make a carrier fighter out of the Mirage G, or even that it was a stop gap for some projected Mirage G carrier fighter that never materialized. Neither of these seems to be the case, at least not as a direct influence. The kernel of truth to this myth is found in Dassault’s partnership with Ling-Temco-Vought during the early part of the V-507’s development. While this had a direct influence on major elements of the V-507 design, the technology exchange between Dassault and LTV was largely one directional. Dassault was not provided with any significant technical information by Vought on the V-507 until the aircraft had been ordered and Dassault partnered with Vought to be able to perform major overhauls and depot level maintenance on the Aéronavale’s Vagabonds.

(http://40.media.tumblr.com/9724874ee7ba867f4c1512de231a2206/tumblr_inline_nwbnejiqCf1t90ue7_1280.jpg)

Despite the misinformation surrounding it, the operational needs that drove the French Navy’s acquisition of the Vagabond are actually pretty clear and very similar to the US Navy’s original Fleet Air Defense (FAD) and later VFX programs. The threat the French carriers posed by Soviet Naval Aviation bombers armed with large anti-ship missiles had only been growing since the Clemenceau and Foch were launched, but it was the appearance of the Tu-22M ‘Backfire’ that truly rendered the F-8 Crusader completely incapable of defending their charges. An aircraft with a higher top speed, far longer range, better radar, and much more capable beyond visual range (BVR) missiles was needed as soon as possible. Unfortunately, the small size of French carriers also meant that there was no way that an aircraft with the necessary performance would ever be able to operate from the decks of the Clemenceau-class ships. The French Navy benefitted from operational factors that the US Navy did not, however.

(http://i.imgur.com/qD3cpY2.jpg)

US supercarriers had to be able to operate completely independently in the North Atlantic or Pacific in environments where the only land for hundreds of miles was likely to be hostile territory defended by enemy air cover. French carriers would typically be operating in the Mediterranean, a comparatively small body of water ringed by friendly air bases. The main aerial threat to the French Navy in the Mediterranean came from Soviet Naval Aviation (AVMF) long range bombers armed with anti-ship missiles. The over 500 nm combat radius of the F-14 would allow it to cover most of the Mediterranean from only a couple of NATO bases. This could also be extended through the use of Etendard buddy tankers once the F-14s rendezvoused with the carrier air group.

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0a/Super_Etendards_in_flight_and_refueling_1988.JPEG/1280px-Super_Etendards_in_flight_and_refueling_1988.JPEG)

So, if the Aéronavale never intended to fly their new fighters from carriers, why was it even a requirement for the F-8 Crusader’s replacement to be carrier capable? Well, the answer to that question starts to get into the political considerations that led to all the confusion about the Vagabond’s role. The Marine Nationale was afraid that any attempt to acquire a purely land-based fighter like the F-15 Eagle would face considerable resistance from the Armée de l'Air, who would maintain that land-based air defense was their responsibility. Even if the Aéronavale could overcome that opposition, they would then have to respond to protests from Dassault. As France’s only manufacturer of modern fighter aircraft, they would insist the French Navy select a domestic aircraft design for the role, such as the Mirage F1, the new Mirage 2000, or even the Mirage 4000 then in development. By requiring the fighter to have performance superior to the F-8 Crusader and be carrier-capable, they could side-step both of these objections—even if they had no intention of ever actually taking advantage of that capability.

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e8/F-8E(FN)_landing_on_carrier_c1964.jpeg/1280px-F-8E(FN)_landing_on_carrier_c1964.jpeg)

The Marine Nationale was savvy enough to realize that purchasing the aircraft was only half the battle, politically-speaking. Once they had them, they had to make sure nobody tried to come in and take them away again, especially when the aircraft entered service and did not start appearing on the decks of France’s carriers. The Aéronavale had a few strategies to deflect such criticism. The first was to emphasize the aircraft’s naval pedigree at every opportunity. The Aéronavale’s policy was to refer to the Vagabond as a “carrier fighter” in all documentation, interviews, and press releases. Similarly, Flottille 12F and 14F were maintained as carrier squadrons based at BAN Landivisiau after transitioning from the F-8 Crusader to the F-14 Vagabond. Vagabond pilots had to remain carrier-qualified while they were active. Typically, this was done using the Fouga CM-175 Zéphyr carrier-capable variant of the Magister jet trainer, but this was supplemented by temporary postings to Etendard squadrons and as exchange officers flying with the US Navy.

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CSHOgRJXAAAOIPr.jpg)

The French Navy also took advantage of opportunities to cross-deck on US carriers with the Vagabond, making sure to take plenty of photographs and film footage whenever they did so. Much of this was used in recruitment material that further reinforced the impression of the F-14 as a carrier fighter in the general public. Finally, the Marine Nationale maintained that the Vagabond could land on the Clemenceau or Foch in an emergency. This theoretical possibility was never trialed by the French Navy for fear that attempts to prove the capability had just as much of a chance of disproving it through a crash. Because of the risk that such a large, heavy aircraft attempting an emergency landing posed to the precious French carriers, Aéronavale F-14 pilots were actually trained to eject alongside the carrier or “plane guard” escort in the event they couldn’t safely reach a land base due to damage, technical malfunction, or lack of fuel.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/V-507LowFrontWithSparrows-VAHF.jpg~original)

Regardless of Aéronavale rhetoric, though, the Vought V-507 was almost exclusively operated from land bases, where it would fly far out over the sea to guard French ships from aerial threats. It was most certainly not an attempt by the French Navy to compete with the Armée de l'Air with its own naval “air force”. Rather, it was the result of a practical assessment of the operating environment and realistic capabilities of France's carrier air groups pitted against the threat of Soviet Naval Aviation. In that role, Aéronavale F-14 units would often migrate from NATO base to NATO base during a carrier’s Mediterranean cruise, truly living up to its name of “Vagabond”.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aéronavale Vought F-14A Vagabond
Post by: Matt Wiser on March 19, 2016, 03:36:54 PM
Nice job, and no doubt LTV would've been very happy to have another export customer besides Imperial Iran.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aéronavale Vought F-14A Vagabond
Post by: lauhof52 on March 19, 2016, 04:42:14 PM
Excellent job, Logan!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aéronavale Vought F-14A Vagabond
Post by: Tophe on March 19, 2016, 06:10:47 PM
Almost the same profile (with a few pixel difference after the jet exhaust) could be a rather-light single-engine fighter, good for the Clémenceau... Will you try ou should I do it?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aéronavale Vought F-14A Vagabond
Post by: elmayerle on March 19, 2016, 10:40:52 PM
Almost the same profile (with a few pixel difference after the jet exhaust) could be a rather-light single-engine fighter, good for the Clémenceau... Will you try ou should I do it?
Something like a navalized single-, or twin-, seat Mirage G with a M-53?
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aéronavale Vought F-14A Vagabond
Post by: apophenia on March 20, 2016, 11:54:03 AM
Very nice ... and great backstory  :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aéronavale Vought F-14A Vagabond
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 23, 2016, 11:45:38 PM
Thanks, everyone! This was a lot of fun to do, even though I spent way too long writing the backstory for this one.

Nice job, and no doubt LTV would've been very happy to have another export customer besides Imperial Iran.

Yep! And France won't be the last, either...

Almost the same profile (with a few pixel difference after the jet exhaust) could be a rather-light single-engine fighter, good for the Clémenceau... Will you try ou should I do it?

Go for it, Tophe! I have enough on my play to go modifying the V-507 in that way!

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aéronavale Vought F-14A Vagabond
Post by: Tophe on March 24, 2016, 01:49:28 AM
Go for it, Tophe! I have enough on my play to go modifying the V-507 in that way!
Here is the single-engined F-14F, thanks!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aéronavale Vought F-14A Vagabond
Post by: Logan Hartke on March 24, 2016, 01:54:14 AM
You might want to give it the single-seat treatment while you're at it.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aéronavale Vought F-14A Vagabond
Post by: Tophe on March 25, 2016, 02:39:17 AM
You are very right, sorry: the F-14F is a single-seater:
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aéronavale Vought F-14A Vagabond
Post by: lauhof52 on March 25, 2016, 08:17:09 PM
nice work Tophe!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aéronavale Vought F-14A Vagabond
Post by: Tophe on March 26, 2016, 03:28:35 AM
Thanks! But Logan is the one to congratulate of course!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Aéronavale Vought F-14A Vagabond
Post by: lauhof52 on March 27, 2016, 07:12:58 PM
Thanks! But Logan is the one to congratulate of course!

That is beyond question!!!!
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Now in Czech!
Post by: Logan Hartke on June 28, 2016, 03:26:17 AM
In case you fit into the overlap on the Venn diagram of people who like my profiles, want to see multiple profiles on a single page in a longer form article instead of forum posts, and people that speak Czech, I've got great news for you!

You can now find a selection of my Viking profiles with the background stories in Czech, curated and translated by Lukáš Visingr!

Radio Dixie: Stuky v bitvě o Midway: Německý design v amerických službách (http://www.radiodixie.cz/clanek/stuky-v-bitve-o-midway-nemecky-design-v-americkych-sluzbach)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/RadioDixie.png~original) (http://www.radiodixie.cz/clanek/stuky-v-bitve-o-midway-nemecky-design-v-americkych-sluzbach)

http://www.radiodixie.cz/clanek/stuky-v-bitve-o-midway-nemecky-design-v-americkych-sluzbach (http://www.radiodixie.cz/clanek/stuky-v-bitve-o-midway-nemecky-design-v-americkych-sluzbach)

Thanks,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Now in Czech!
Post by: taiidantomcat on July 28, 2016, 03:02:56 AM
Sorry to be so late to this party. I had typed up a response but it never sent  ::)

Really enjoy these profiles and the colors and squadron emblems and markings. its just like pure sugar to a candy addict. great to see the process broken down especially as I hope to start doing some profiles here sometime. Just really cool all around and I hope to see more of these soon

 :-*
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Marseille's He 100 in plastic
Post by: Logan Hartke on February 03, 2017, 04:02:09 AM
Here are some great images of a 1/32 scale Special Hobby Heinkel He 100 that David Atkin made, inspired by my Marseille He 100 profile. He posted these to my Facebook wall.

(https://scontent.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/16387221_10208549176394514_7991987800169570424_n.jpg?oh=8052d795c949f1921e35dc96b58432f3&oe=59415B5B)

(https://scontent.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/16473176_10208549176474516_6595080362096529812_n.jpg?oh=0ded6864ddb29a21e026f1dd342abc89&oe=59436B92)

(https://scontent.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/16386953_10208549176434515_6174338144618649280_n.jpg?oh=bda127923f7019616c6e4de77135f19e&oe=5907151C)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/loganov/Profiles/Heinkel%20He%20100/900px/GermanHe100D5.jpg) (http://fc08.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2013/042/8/9/marseille_s_heinkel_he_100d_4_z_trop__afrika__by_comradeloganov-d5umkyw.jpg)

http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=144.msg38318#msg38318 (http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=144.msg38318#msg38318)

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Marseille's He 100 in plastic
Post by: GTX_Admin on February 04, 2017, 02:52:21 AM
 :)
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Marseille's He 100 in plastic
Post by: apophenia on February 04, 2017, 10:47:06 AM
Very nice!  :D
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Tank Concepts
Post by: Volkodav on July 16, 2017, 08:34:09 PM
Yeah, but only loosely, Volkodov. The main thing was that they all used basically the same ammunition. As I remember it, during the fighting in North Africa, French 75 cases and powder were combined with the German AP rounds from the PzKpfw IV's 7.5cm KwK 37 and fired out of the M3 Grant's M2/M3 75mm guns. Interestingly, that means that the 75mm gun used on Chaffees until the 1990s used ammunition of the same dimensions as that of the original 75mm Mle 1897, nearly 100 years old.

The 7.92 caliber of the BESA also struck me as odd. As I understand it, the BESA was just a copy of the Czech ZB-53 and the RAC just never bothered to convert it, considering it to be more trouble than it was worth.

Cheers,

Logan

Just reading through the topic to make sure my "new" idea isn't an already mentioned old one when I saw this post.  I have since read that the UK was looking to replace .303 with 7.92 but as with the earlier 7mm and other plans it never went ahead.  Also as this calibre was being used by RAC which had its own unique logistics systems it was thought that it was not worth the effort to convert the BESA to what was seen as an inferior calibre.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Marseille's He 100 in plastic
Post by: Logan Hartke on July 17, 2017, 11:24:17 AM
Yeah, the .303 was supposed to be replaced by a rimless round even before WWI (.276 Enfield) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.276_Enfield), but various wars kept getting in the way. In the end, it wouldn't be replaced until 7.62mm NATO came around.

I'm really of two minds about that. First of all, rimless ammunition is certainly more modern and preferable to rimmed ammunition, so—considering the fact that Germany adopted the Patrone 88 in 1888 and Switzerland adopted the 7.5x55mm in 1889—the .303 British was really obsolete the day it was adopted. In fairness, the US would adopt the .30-40 Krag three years later and it wasn't until 1906 that the US got its ammunition act together, but the .303 would continue to give Britain headaches in weapons development for the next 60 years.

That having been said, the .303 served Britain well for that same 60 years, and the Russians still use the 7.62x54mmR round, which is a rimmed rifle cartridge no more advanced than the .303, and there's no sign of them switching anytime soon. The PKM is arguably the best medium machine gun in the world today and it was designed around the 7.62x54mmR, so it can't be that much of a handicap.

Britain probably should've adopted a rimless rifle round prior to WWI, but—in the end—it really didn't matter very much that they didn't.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Marseille's He 100 in plastic
Post by: Volkodav on July 17, 2017, 01:32:06 PM
Yep, the .276 Enfield was apparently a beast of a round designed following experience in the Boer War for long range engagements.  Its failing was high barrel wear and by the time that was sorted WWI was around the corner so there was no time to convert. 

I've actually thought it a shame the UK looked to Europe for their new calibres when the .30-06 was such a nice round and would have simplified so many logistic issues.  The development of the M1917 Enfield in 30-06 from the .303 P14 Enfield would have been the perfect opportunity to make the change at minimal cost.  This would have justified the retention of .30-06 in the Brownings adopted by the RAF, then in turn, the adoption of the Browning by the RAC instead of the 7.92 BESA, then the .50 Browning M2 instead of the 15mm BESA and maybe even seeing the .50 finding its way onto various British aircraft and even warships.  The BREN would have worked better with the .30-06 as well, with most of its development problems coming from adapting it to the rimed .303.

Miles off topic now, sorry.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Marseille's He 100 in plastic
Post by: Logan Hartke on July 17, 2017, 11:19:21 PM
The BREN would have worked better with the .30-06 as well, with most of its development problems coming from adapting it to the rimmed .303.

Taiwan made a Bren in .30-06 (the T41), so it was very possible.

On the note of the M1917 Enfield, there's a broadening group of shooters that consider the M1917 Enfield to be the finest bolt action battle rifle of WWI, and almost certainly the most underrated. Somewhat accidentally, it combined the best elements of German, British, and American rifles into one fantastic package. From the Germans it got the strong, accurate Mauser action. From the British it got the more ergonomically placed turned down bolt handle for more rapid manipulation of the action and the "short rifle" length at a time when much of the world was still lugging around full length rifles. From the Americans, it got the wonderful .30-06 rimless round. On top of all that, most shooters consider the sights (which it inherited from the Pattern 1913 and 1914 Enfields) to be the best of the period. The Americans liked the sights so much that future American rifles (the M1903A3 Springfield, M1 Garand, and even the M1 Carbine) would use them. A lot of well respected gun channels on YouTube (Forgotten Weapons (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JZLKtm7HcG4), C&Rsenal (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWrRowbvVio), TFB TV (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NePsNH4WQM)) have been positively glowing on it after running some practical shooting exercises with it.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Marseille's He 100 in plastic
Post by: Volkodav on July 18, 2017, 03:02:46 PM
Quite enjoy Forgotten Guns, particularly because it leaves out the gung ho BS of some other channels.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Marseille's He 100 in plastic
Post by: Logan Hartke on July 18, 2017, 10:36:46 PM
In that case, check out C&Rsenal.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - Marseille's He 100 in plastic
Post by: Volkodav on July 18, 2017, 10:51:17 PM
Thanks will do.
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - SdKfz 231 Halbkettenfahrzeug
Post by: Logan Hartke on April 11, 2018, 01:56:38 PM
I know I haven't been around much, lately, but I recently stumbled across this image on DeviantArt (https://flaketom.deviantart.com/art/More-things-to-crush-191276607) and I thought the idea of an SdKfz 231 halftrack conversion was inspired. The problem was the track system used on the concept, though. It's a Citroën-Kégresse style rubber band track system with a Timken suspension, as used on the American T9E1 halftrack truck (https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-14cHowXNn6A/V21boTUSo5I/AAAAAAAAqFY/8CddhokSM5w9KPSKJReKe7f9z79p3tiuQCKgB/s1600/T9E1.jpg) converted by Marmon-Herrington. Better choices would have been something like the German halftrack suspensions used on the SdKfz 250 or Maultier.

So, I decided to make a couple of better-looking and more practical alternatives using some images from Tanks Encyclopedia (http://www.tanks-encyclopedia.com/ww2/nazi_germany/Sd-Kfz-231_6-rad.php) as a starting basis. Normally I'm working with original high-resolution images from line art and am not used to just modifying existing images this way. This is really more up Apophenia's alley. As such, I decided to blatantly rip his presentation style since I was in a thoroughly derivative mode already. Anyway, hopefully you guys enjoy what I cobbled together tonight.

Cheers,

Logan
Title: Re: Logan's Profiles - SdKfz 231 Halbkettenfahrzeug
Post by: BigH827 on July 13, 2018, 09:49:20 AM
Those are both nice, but I think the Germans would have gone with the track system of 250 half-track.
But if what your going for is what would they do after 1940 to keep these armored cars useable, then your idea works. The Panzer 1 was on its last legs in 41, so it's running gear as did happen with the Opel Mule, would be put to other uses.
The six wheeled cars did weigh much more than the Panzer 1. So no real extra stress on the roadwheels and tracks.