Author Topic: A Slightly Different D.VII in 1/72 Scale  (Read 493 times)

Offline Brian da Basher

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A Slightly Different D.VII in 1/72 Scale
« on: August 18, 2018, 11:19:56 PM »


While the Fokker D.VII is perhaps one of the most famous W.W. I aircraft,



far less known are the prototypes that preceded it.



Few realize that the initial D.VII prototype had the signature Fokker "comma" shaped rudder.



Fewer still know that at first it even omitted the inter-plane struts.



These weren't needed due to the Fokker D.VII wings' cantilever construction but were added later to ease the minds of pilots who found their omission disconcerting.

Or so the perhaps apocryphal tale goes.







I came across this D.VII origin story in a book I read as a lad. It may have been by Quentin Reynolds but it's been so long I can't remember.

However, the story stayed with me all these years. I knew someday I'd have to model that D.VII and here it is.



I started with the venerable 1/72 Esci kit that's a re-pop of the old Revell kit. You've got to admit, that's some nice box art.



The instructions begin with a scholarly history of the aircraft.



Then they progress to assembly which isn't complicated and about what you'd expect from a kit of early 1960's vintage.



Last is a helpful paint guide.



As is customary, this would be utterly ignored.

And here's how the classic Esci D.VII looks in the wild.



That's not bad considering it's a 1980's boxing and the molds had been in use for 20 years by then.

I wasn't feeling so sure about the original decals though.



Not to worry, I found replacements from a sheet for an Eduard Albatros.



I started by getting out the old hairy stick and painting as much as I could while still on the sprues.



I also did what little there is of the interior and cut a new rudder from card.



I used acrylics, Polly Scale Aged White mostly along with Model Masters Steel and Aluminum on the cowling.

Assembly was straight forward except for covering over the gap where the guns are supposed to go with card.

I put the main decals on before mounting the wing.





Here's a look at the new rudder cut from card and covered with some of my diminishing Polly Scale Reefer White.





The prop was painted Model Masters Dark Earth with a stripe of Sand. Testors Gold was used for the boss.



The prop was then given a coat of Liquitex acrylic Gloss Medium before I added the logo decals. I was pleased with that extra bit of detail.



I also added a windscreen cut from clear blister pack and attached with PVA Gator Glue.

Then I put those cabanes together and attached the upper wing.



Few things are as satisfying as successfully mounting that top wing.





I decided to go with a minimal prototype marking scheme. Maybe someday I'll do a camouflaged combat version.



It took me about a week to put this one together. I'd like to thank Bill for sending me the kit, I couldn't have done it without you!



I hope you enjoyed this unique version of the famous Fokker D.VII.

Brian da Basher
« Last Edit: August 19, 2018, 10:32:30 AM by Brian da Basher »

Offline Frank3k

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Re: A Slightly Different D.VII in 1/72 Scale
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2018, 06:07:42 AM »
The D. VIII is one of my favorite WWI airplanes. Your version looks sleek! The colors are nice and basic. Gator glue is great! I have both the thick and thin versions.

Of course, I'm 12 and the name reminds me of this joke...

Offline elmayerle

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Re: A Slightly Different D.VII in 1/72 Scale
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2018, 11:44:48 AM »
Beautiful project and excellent back-dating.

Offline Camthalion

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Re: A Slightly Different D.VII in 1/72 Scale
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2018, 06:36:16 PM »
very nice

Offline AXOR

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Re: A Slightly Different D.VII in 1/72 Scale
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2018, 07:10:28 PM »
Well done Brian !!!
Alex

Offline The Big Gimper

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Re: A Slightly Different D.VII in 1/72 Scale
« Reply #5 on: August 19, 2018, 09:52:35 PM »
You get seven out of seven stars on this build Brian!
Work in progress ::

I am giving up listing them. They all end up on the shelf of procrastination anyways.

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Offline b29r

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Re: A Slightly Different D.VII in 1/72 Scale
« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2018, 10:10:42 PM »
I sure enjoyed seeing this, well done!
Best, Kem

Offline KiwiZac

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Re: A Slightly Different D.VII in 1/72 Scale
« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2018, 10:27:42 AM »
Top job Brian! I don't think I've ever seen that version built. And I rather like the idea of doing a camouflaged version!
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Offline apophenia

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Re: A Slightly Different D.VII in 1/72 Scale
« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2018, 02:58:02 AM »
Excellent job Brian! Love it ... and it is a genuine whif too  :smiley:

Nerding out for a moment, there's been some historical confusion over the Fokker V 6 - a cantilever triplane fighter prototype of early 1917 - which was also designated D VII. But that 'D VII' was an internal Fokker designation.

The Fokker V 11 flown in December 1917 was single-seat biplane fighter - complete with wing bracing struts. With a few tweaks, the V 11 became the prototype for the production D VII ... in this case, the D VII being an official Idflieg designation.

BTW: There is still some debate about changes to the V 11 at the January 1918 Idflieg fighter competition. The V 11 involved was werk nummer 1883. Some say that the V 11 was submitted (in your plain canvas finish) with comma tail and short fuselage, then modified literally overnight. Others say that the 'modified' machine was actually the V 11/II ... which just happened to receive the same werk nummer.

There is a photo of painted "V 11/II" with its fuselage lengthened 40 cm (as per D VII) but retaining the comma tail. [/nerd]
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Offline Kelmola

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Re: A Slightly Different D.VII in 1/72 Scale
« Reply #9 on: August 23, 2018, 04:23:34 AM »
Didn't the real D.VII have cantilever wings though (hence the lack of bracing wires which were used well into the 1930's in other types), the struts were there just to strenghten the structure? Damaged D.VII's with their struts shot off made it back to the base on several occastions (latter claim appears in Squadron/Signal's D.VII in Action, p.11).

The Albatros fighters had been eager to shed their wings so one could assume that fuselage mounts alone would not have been trustworthy enough for the LsK or the pilots even with a cantilever wing, so it was purposefully over-engineered.

Offline Brian da Basher

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Re: A Slightly Different D.VII in 1/72 Scale
« Reply #10 on: August 23, 2018, 05:19:47 AM »
You guys are sharp as all get-out and make me feel lucky to know people with so much knowledge & expertise.

The story is perhaps apocryphal. I'm sure a lot of those books targeted at young boys back then were full of things like that.

The first prototype Dr.I was indeed missing the interplane struts and they were added later. In both the Dr. I and D.VII the interplane struts were noted as not being a structural necessity but they did minimize wing flexing.

Much of what I know is a bit old, like the rest of me. More recent research may have proved all of this wrong. It's a great story regardless.

Now that I think of it, I might have to do a camo Dr.I minus the interplane struts. Spats are a possibility.

Brian da Basher

Offline finsrin

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Re: A Slightly Different D.VII in 1/72 Scale
« Reply #11 on: September 17, 2018, 06:33:53 AM »
Lack of outer struts says improved structure mid 1920s version to me.