Author Topic: Scottish Skorpions (Frogfoot) - "The Lochness Monster"  (Read 8070 times)

Offline Logan Hartke

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Scottish Skorpions (Frogfoot) - "The Lochness Monster"
« on: November 09, 2013, 02:06:49 PM »
As per usual, click on the profile to see it at a larger size.



Wow, here's an aircraft type that I haven't touched in a long time!  And boy does it show...  So much I'd redo on this one if I had the time.  Anyway, no time for the backstory tonight, so you will all get the full write-up later, hopefully tomorrow night, may not be until next week.

Short version, the scheme is based on the Coastal Command aircraft flown by No. 612 Squadron in WWII.  The aircraft is being operated by a recently independent Royal Scottish Air Force in a not-too-distant hypothetical future.  I'll also post the versions of the roundel in a larger size when I do the full write-up.  I hope you all like it!

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Tophe

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Re: Scottish Skorpions (Frogfoot) - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2013, 03:01:50 PM »
Pleasant profile, thanks.

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Scottish Skorpions (Frogfoot) - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2013, 04:44:32 AM »
Looks good.  I am looking forward to the backstory for this one.
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Offline Claymore

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Re: Scottish Skorpions (Frogfoot) - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2013, 05:04:45 AM »
I'll also post the versions of the roundel in a larger size when I do the full write-up. 

Nice - the Lion Rampant from the Scottish Royal Standard - a good choice.  :)
Friendly fire isn't and suppressive fire rarely does!

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Scottish Skorpions (Frogfoot) - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2013, 11:34:33 AM »
So, I'm not too concerned about the details of the transition, but in this scenario, Scotland would end up as a constitutional monarchy, like Canada and Australia.  I did this mainly to keep the roundels and squadrons consistent.  So, as for the Skorpion, though, my idea was that a newly independent Scotland would have a need for an aircraft with a good maritime strike capability that could be used in the air policing role if necessary.  As such, this L-239 has wing tanks, a Litening III targeting pod, Paveway IIs, Mavericks, and AMRAAMs.  It could be fitted with more dedicated anti-ship missiles, if necessary.  I expected that Scotland would have the lineage of at least No. 602, 603, and 612 squadrons transferred with its independence.  In this scenario, Scotland gives 612 Sqn. an active military role again, equipping it with the L-239 in the anti-shipping/strike role.  Oh, by the way, can anyone that speaks Scots Gaelic tell me if I got the translation for Royal Scottish Air Force right?  I tried.

As for the roundel itself, it definitely pays homage to the RAF's roundel and is done in the style of Australia's and Canada's roundels, as well.  The lion is a major difference, however, and it's done in the style of the kangaroo in the RAAF roundel, kiwi in RNZAF roundel, and springbok in the old SAAF roundel.  I know the thistle may be the more appropriate national symbol, but it seemed less martial for a military insignia compared to the lion.  The standard Scottish lion is a bit...intricate for a roundel, so I took the somewhat simplified but still appropriate lion from British Caledonian's logo.  The other big difference is the color blue.  This lighter blue comes from Scottish Saltire instead of the darker blue on the Union Jack.



In the basic, full color variant above, it's seen with the full roundel and Scottish flag as the fin flash.



In this variant, the colors are retained, but with the omission of the fin flash, the same angled cross is overlaid on the roundel.  I really like the way this looked.



Finally, here's the low vis roundel.  It's a variant of the roundel with the cross.  You can see this on the upperside of the wings on the Skorpion profile, too.  When I design my own roundels, this is a pet peeve of mine.  I like a roundel that retains its unique look when all the color is removed and this does that very well, I think.

Hope you all like it!

Cheers,

Logan

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Re: Scottish Skorpions (Frogfoot) - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2013, 11:42:20 AM »
I really like that roundel!
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

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But you can make the Bastard work for it.

Offline ChernayaAkula

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Re: Scottish Skorpions (Frogfoot) - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2013, 02:24:46 PM »
^ Same here!  :) Good job!
Cheers,
Moritz

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Offline Claymore

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Re: Scottish Skorpions (Frogfoot) - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2013, 11:12:02 PM »
Very nice indeed Logan.  I particularly like the Sqn detail as 602 (City of Glasgow) Sqn, 603 (City of Edinburgh) Sqn and 612 (County of Aberdeen) Sqn are 3 of the 4 current RAF Reserve Sqns base in Scotland - the other being my own, 2622 (Highland) Sqn.  Whilst the 600 series Sqns all have flying heritages, 2622 (H) Sqn has always been a Reserve RAF Regiment Sqn.  However none of these Sqns is currently operating in the flying role; 612 (County of Aberdeen) Sqn is currently an Aeromedical Sqn.  Factoids over!  ;)
Friendly fire isn't and suppressive fire rarely does!

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Scottish Skorpions (Frogfoot) - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2013, 12:05:05 AM »
Yeah, Claymore, I do a lot of research on all these and only a tenth of it ever finds its way into the writeup.  I was aware that 602, 603, and 612 are in a non-flying role, but it was their flying heritage that had me figuring that a new RScAF would use their unit lineages in its "new" squadrons.  If they were given the unit resources along with the unit histories, they would probably reallocate them or rebrand the units.  This happens all the time in the military.

My problem with the active RAF flying squadrons was that many of them were founded in England as opposed to Scotland, so I was looking for RAF units with flying histories that were raised in Scotland.  602, 603, and 612 Squadrons seemed to be about the best candidates.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Claymore

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Re: Scottish Skorpions (Frogfoot) - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2013, 07:39:16 AM »
I quite agree, it was a great idea to use those particular Sqns.  Inspired!  :)
Friendly fire isn't and suppressive fire rarely does!

Offline ChrisF

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Re: Scottish Skorpions (Frogfoot) - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2013, 05:38:18 AM »
Love it ! And REALLY love the roundels !

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Scottish Skorpions (Frogfoot) - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2013, 12:56:39 PM »
How about another?  As per usual, click on the profile to see it at a larger size.



Here's another retro scheme trialed by No. 612 on their Skorpions.  This one comes from their postwar Vampires, the last aircraft flown by the unit.  The roundel bars are based on those worn by No. 612 at that time.  All the profiles and models I've seen showing this are of poor quality and/or contradictory.  I haven't seen a good photo of them, either.  I've asked someone more knowledgeable than myself on such things and he advised me that it was based on the Gordon tartan.  That sounded reasonable enough to me and fit the more reliable sources, so that's what I based them on, as well.



Weapons are the RBS-15, Maverick, and AMRAAM in a very anti-ship loadout.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline ChrisF

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Re: Scottish Skorpions (Frogfoot) - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #12 on: November 13, 2013, 07:22:26 AM »
"Very Anti ship"

Love it !!  ;D

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Scottish Skorpions (Frogfoot) - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #13 on: November 13, 2013, 12:09:44 PM »
Now for the final one.  This one is not very anti-ship.  As per usual, click on the profile to see it at a larger size.



Every good European air force needs a representative at a Tiger Meet and the brand new RScAF is no exception.  I call this scheme the "Tiger Shark".  I'll let you guess why.



The loadout is an air-to-ground strike loadout, representative of a Coalition participation mission.  It consists of LGBs, HARMs, JDAMs, and AMRAAMs.  The roundels are all low-vis, finally showing off the integrated Saltire when there is no flag for a fin flash.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Gingie

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Re: Scottish Skorpions (Frogfoot) - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #14 on: November 16, 2013, 02:06:53 AM »
.  I know the thistle may be the more appropriate national symbol, but it seemed less martial for a military insignia compared to the lion.

HEY! We have a leaf in ours!  ;)

Really liking this series of profiles. I have to confess my ignorance (and my laziness to google), but is that a real aircraft, or a whatif based on the Su-25?

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Scottish Skorpions (Frogfoot) - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #15 on: November 16, 2013, 02:25:48 AM »
And a mighty leaf it is, too!  :D

I'm glad you like these profiles, though.  I had a fun time trying to think of ways to keep the camouflage interesting for these, while still being somewhat unique.  As for the aircraft, it's an Su-39 variant of my own design, the AeroTAM L-239 Skorpion.

http://www.whatifmodelers.com/index.php/topic,20962.msg342244.html#msg342244

The L-239 Skorpion is the product of a collaboration between Aero Vodochody of the Czech Republic and TAM (Tbilisi Aircraft Manufacturing) of Georgia.  After the bombing of TAM's factory in August of 2008, TAM began seeking a partner with which to further develop the Su-25 airframe.  This had been done earlier and on a much more limited scale with Elbit when the Su-25KM Scorpion upgrade was developed.  TAM's intention, however, was the marketing, construction, and sale of new-build airframes.  Fearing additional disruption to its manufacturing facilities, however, TAM looked to move the main production line out of Georgia.  A partner was quickly found with Aero Vodochody.  Aero had been thus far unsuccessful in creating new sales for the L-159 and so had the manufacturing space, workforce, and design staff to spare.  Aero also had the most success in "Westernizing" Soviet-era airframes and updating them to 21st century standards.  Within a year, the primary jigs and tools necessary to restart production of the Su-25 airframe had been shipped to the Czech Republic.

The combined design staff of Aero and TAM came together to modify the Su-25T (built in Tbilisi before the breakup of the Soviet Union) to suit their purposes.  The laser targeting system in the nose was eliminated and a version of the Italian Grifo radar took its place (the targeting systems being moved to a pod on the centerline).  The GSh-2-30 cannon was replaced with the BK-27 in a pod similar to that used on the Alpha Jet.  The cockpit was replaced with a new glass cockpit, also getting a new ejection seat and better pilot protection in the process.  The Russian Tumansky R-195 engines were no longer an option, so non-afterburning F404s were substituted with a non-afterburning version of the Chinese WP-13 engine offered as a substitute.  The greater fuel efficiency of the F404 gave the aircraft a longer range than any previous Su-25 variant.  Elbit was contracted for much of the weapons and countermeasures integration, the highlight of the latter being the incorporation of the MUSIC DIRCM.

Even with those changes, however, TAM and Aero kept as much of the original airframe as possible, changing very little of the actual aircraft structure or flight controls.  Many of the original, unguided Soviet weapons could still be carried and used in addition to the newer Western guided weapons.  Like the Su-25TM, a fifth pylon was installed outboard of the four regular pylons on the wing.  This could accept either a jamming pod or (more typically) air-to-air missiles.

Thus the AeroTAM company and the L-239 Skorpion were born.  The profile below depicts the first Czech-built, F404-powered prototype as it appeared for its test flight.  The gun was not carried, although the pod (with ballast) was mounted.






Cheers,

Logan

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Re: Scottish Skorpions (Frogfoot) - "The Lochness Monster"
« Reply #16 on: December 14, 2013, 11:54:08 PM »
I know the thistle may be the more appropriate national symbol, but it seemed less martial for a military insignia compared to the lion.

I understand exactly what you're saying, and you're right. BUT the thistle has been part of Scots military insignia for as long as there has
been a Scots military, and it may be worth pointing out that the thistle is associated with the motto "nemo me impune lacessit" which is usually, and rather pompously, translated as "No-one assails me with impunity", or informally into Scots as " Wha daur meddle wi' me?"
which renders into English as "Who dares meddle with me?" Quite belligerent, and suitable as a military motto for any defence force!