Author Topic: Apophenia's Offerings  (Read 336928 times)

Offline kitnut617

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2355 on: November 05, 2019, 10:49:05 PM »
At first glance at that Stephen, I thought at first you had used an Asch-82 engine, like how it was installed on a Hurricane. It wouldn't be very hard to make a model of it, just use the cowling from the Omega Hurricane kit (or a copy of it  ;) )
« Last Edit: November 05, 2019, 10:54:09 PM by kitnut617 »

Offline jcf

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2356 on: November 06, 2019, 04:45:09 AM »
P&W's R-1830 powered take on a radial engined Hawk 81/P-40, evidently it regularly out flew Merlin powered P-40Fs
stationed at a nearby base:


Drawings from a Russian monograph, take with a grain of salt.  ;D :icon_fsm:




« Last Edit: November 06, 2019, 05:03:53 AM by jcf »
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Offline Brian da Basher

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2357 on: November 06, 2019, 07:07:11 AM »
Those are some very sleek P-36s and the new engine at least adds a fast look!

The OD one up top appears loaded for bear. Whether or not it could catch said bear remains to be seen... ;D

Always great to see your latest, apophenia!

Brian da Basher

Offline jcf

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2358 on: November 06, 2019, 08:49:34 AM »
Here's a goofy thought, a three-row radial using R-1535 components, the R-2300,
that way you get a 44" diameter allowing a sleek profile. 
;D
"Evil our grandsires were, our fathers worse;
And we, till now unmatched in ill,
Must leave successors more corrupted still."
Horace, 65BC - 8BC. Marsh translation.

Offline apophenia

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2359 on: November 07, 2019, 09:28:38 AM »
Thanks folks.

Brian: You touch it with a needle! If yer gonna be called a 'pursuit', you'd better be able to catch something  ;D

Robert: My first thought was the ASh 82 too ... but there's not much to distinguish the Shvetsov (roughly 'R-2515') from the available R-2600. Power outputs are similar but so too are dry weights (~ 2,045 lbs for the R-2600, 1,900-2,000 lbs for most ASh 82 variants).

I'm not sure why but I was expecting the ASh 82 to be lighter. It occurred to me later that my whif engine was roughly the same size as a Gnome-Rhône 14N. The French engine was lighter (1,370 lbs dry) but, in our timeframe, only generating 1,180 hp for T/O  :P

Jon: Thanks for that. I had P&W's Hawk 81 testbed in mind but had never before seen in drawings.

I like your idea of less Junior Twin Wasp  :smiley:  Just because Armstrong-Siddeley couldn't get a triple-row radial to work, doesn't mean it couldn't be done. Indeed, at that time, Pratt would've been the one to put your money on to make it happen!
_________________________

Okay ... new stuff. I had another go at a P-36/radial P-40 evolution which I'm a bit happier about. (Still not really fitting into the GB though, I reckon.)

In this case, the top profile is a P-42B engine testbed for the Wright XR-2600-1. As before, the tail has been moved aft in an attempt to restore c/g. As shown, a small spinner has replaced the original, large spinner removed in a not entirely successful effort to cure engine overheating. Note the gun barrel aperture in the cowling for synchronized .50s.

The production-model P-60B Superhawks eliminated the cowl guns in favour of four wing-mounted .50-calibres. A new, forward-fuselage fuel tank replaced the P-40's rear fuselage tank in some models of P-60 and augmented that rear tank in others. Less obvious is that the entire forward fuselage has been lengthened, pushing the cockpit aft (relative to the P-36/P-40).

The lower profile shows a P-60B-CU-2 - one of the longer-range Superhawk models that retained the rear fuselage tank. The 18th Pursuit Group was based out of Hawaii but the 44th Pursuit Squadron was redeployed to the Azores in July 1940. [1] By the beginning of 1941, the 44th's P-40Cs were being replaced with higher-performing P-60Bs.
___________________________

[1] The US occupation of the Azores was completed under 'War Plan Gray'. Just as British forces invaded and 'secured' Iceland in May 1940, the US occupied the Azores without Portuguese permission on 22 June 1940.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2019, 09:30:34 AM by apophenia »
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Offline Brian da Basher

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2360 on: November 08, 2019, 06:18:36 AM »
Oh my now these are even better!

I never thought I'd see the P-36 look, dare I say it, sleek and sexy!

Fantastic!

You've outdone yourself on these apophenia.

Brian da Basher

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2361 on: November 09, 2019, 01:49:07 AM »
Hmmm....one of these would look good with a ducted spinner me thinks... ;)
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

Offline kitnut617

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2362 on: November 09, 2019, 02:28:51 AM »
And a bubble canopy ---

Offline apophenia

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2363 on: November 09, 2019, 07:15:01 AM »
Hmmm, might have to try those. But, meanwhile ...

Sometimes one aircraft type is simply overshadowed by another, better design. Such was to be the fate of the Brewster F3A Barracuda naval fighter. Somehow the Barracuda could never escape association with the more powerful Vought F4U Corsair. It was also - however unfairly - always connected with its mediocre predecessor, the F2A Buffalo.

It rankled management at the Brewster Aeronautical Corporation that its submission for the US Navy's Competition SD112-13 had been overlooked. Instead, the Bureau of Aeronautics had chosen Vought to build this R-2800-powered naval fighter. But things seemed to be looking up for Brewster when Vought's XF4U proved all but impossible to carrier land. Dayton Brown in Brewster's design office quickly drew up a rival scheme as an unsolicited F2A replacement fighter.

The Brewster Proposal 40 concept was obviously derived from the Buffalo but there were so many changes as to make it a fresh design. It was based on the less powerful Wright R-2600 14-cylinder radial which was viewed as being further along in development than Pratt's 18-cylinder R-2800 engine. The BuAer accepted Brewster's proposal and ordered a prototype built as the XF3A-1. This prototype matched the F2A wing with engine power more than 50% higher. By comparison with the F2A, the XF3A-1's performance was spectacular but the fine handling of the former was lost.

Top Brewster XF3A-1 prototype. Note SB2A-style cowling, F2A-type canopy, [1] wings, and under-fuselage viewing window.

Nevertheless, a small batch of F3A-2 production aircraft were ordered. These differed from the prototype (and the cancelled F3A-1 series) in having an enlarged tailplane and squared off wing tips. A 'full-blown' canopy was also introduced after production had begun. Alas, by then, the Barracuda (as Brewster's marketing department had dubbed the F3A) was revealing its true nature. As a carrier fighter, the Brewster was a dead loss. In some aspects, the F3A-2's landing-on characteristics were even worse than the Corsair's. By the time that F3A-2s were being delivered, US Navy planning had already shifted emphasis to Grumman's superior F6F Hellcat.

Anticipating the fate of US Corsairs, the F3A-2s were diverted to the USMC. The first to take on the new Brewster was Marine Fighting Squadron 221 which had just given up its F2A-3s upon return to Hawaii. The unit then 2e-equipped with Brewster F3A-2s at Marine Corps Air Station Ewa on Oahu. In February 1943, the squadron and its aircraft were loaded aboard the USS Nassau (CVE-16) for transport to Espiritu Santo. VMF-221 joined attack squadron VMA-214 for the fight on Guadalcanal.

Guadalcanal would be the high point in the career of the Brewster F3A. A handful for even experienced pilots when landing-on, the US Navy wisely moved on. The Marines were happy to replace their F4Fs ... but the Brewster's armament was limited (six-gunned Wildcats were now appearing). After Guadalcanal was liberated, both Marine units would re-equip with F4U Corsairs.

Bottom Brewster F3A-3 Barracuda fighter on Guadalcanal. Note the square-tipped wings, extended fin, and lack of belly glazing. This F3A-3 features a 'clear-view' canopy.

This aircraft was flown by Major William C. Humberd, USMC. Note that the individual aircraft number has been partially over-painted by the newly-added 'bars' on the national insignia. [2] A new aircraft number in white features on the cowling. Other, less official, markings include a '221' Barracuda on the cowl and 'kill' flags beneath the cockpit.
__________________________

[1] Although hard to spot, the XF3A-1's rear glazed area is slightly reduced compared with the F2A type.

[2] Red outlines were applied only to the fuselage rounder. Wing roundels had only plain white bars added.
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Offline Brian da Basher

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2364 on: November 09, 2019, 09:23:27 PM »
Wow that's one beautiful Brewster! Now those are two words you don't see together often...

Your modifications look entirely plausible and the new canopy is something I could see them doing if the Buffalo had been successful enough for a follow-on. You did a fantastic job representing a nicely worn USN scheme and those cool red-surround 1943 U.S. markings are a nice bonus!

Another feast for the eyes, apophenia! Very well done!

Brian da Basher

Offline Old Wombat

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2365 on: November 09, 2019, 11:04:13 PM »
Looks, oddly, a little like a short, tubby F6F. :-\


("A little", I said! ::))
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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2366 on: November 10, 2019, 03:28:22 AM »
 :smiley:
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

Offline apophenia

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2367 on: November 10, 2019, 07:18:17 AM »
Thanks folks!

Hmmm....one of these would look good with a ducted spinner me thinks... ;)

And a bubble canopy ---

Had a go ...

The top one with the ducted spinner I'm calling the Curtiss Hawk 81S - since the XP-42 was a Hawk 75S ;)

The bottom one was just going to have a sliding canopy similar to that on the XP-40Q-2. Then its started sprouting a turbocharger, belly intercooler, got stretched, and (eventually) a completely new tail and a new wing centre section with a slight inverted gull (for prop clearance with the same main undercarriage).

Can't say that I really like either of them. An evolved P-36 or P-40 might look good with that 'bubble' canopy ... but a bit incongruous as well, me thinks.

Back onto whif engines ... I'd forgotten that Pratt & Whitney's R-2180-1 Twin Hornet was proposed for at least one fighter design - the Republic P-44 Rocket (cancelled as obsolete in September 1940). Although I'm not sure why Pratt called their R-2180 a Twin Hornet. It had slightly more bore and half inch more stroke than the R-1830 Twin Wasp but less than either of the RW Hornet engines.

So, what about those historical Hornets - the R-1690 (beginning in 1926) and the R-1860 (from 1929 on)? What happens if you turn those Hornets into twin-row radials? The obvious whif developments would be an R-2628 Twin Hornet (a 14-cylinder to rival Wright's R-2600) or an R-2890 Double Hornet. Jumping up to 18-cylinders gives you a whif R-3380 Duplex Hornet (a rival for the Wright R-3350) or a jumbo R-3720 (nudging into RW R-4360 territory).
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Offline kitnut617

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2368 on: November 10, 2019, 07:46:44 AM »
That bubble top looks great Stephen   :smiley: :smiley: :smiley: :smiley: :smiley: :smiley: :smiley: :smiley: :smiley:

Offline Brian da Basher

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2369 on: November 10, 2019, 07:59:47 AM »
That bubble top looks great Stephen   :smiley: :smiley: :smiley: :smiley: :smiley: :smiley: :smiley: :smiley: :smiley:

Concur. Now that's hot!

Your imagination is totally boundless and most enviable, apophenia.

As is your talent for rendering those fantastic finishes!

Brian da Basher