Author Topic: Tilt-Rotor Aircraft  (Read 85932 times)

Offline Jeffry Fontaine

  • Unaffiliated Independent Subversive...and the last person to go for a trip on a Mexicana dH Comet 4
  • Global Moderator
  • His stash is able to be seen from space...
    • SketchUp 3D Warehouse - My Digital Models
Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
« on: January 08, 2012, 06:08:00 AM »
A topic for all tilt-rotor aircraft

I was browsing Jose José Fernandes' latest update in his discussion topic and found myself wondering what a kit-bash between an OV-10 Bronco and the V-22 Osprey would look like.  Retain the booms but lose the engines.  The booms could then be devoted to the landing gear and fuel plus whatever avionics that could not be accommodated in the fuselage proper.  At the wing tips - mount the engines and rotor components from the V-22.  The only thing that I can see at this point that could be a problem is the rotor blade clearance with the tail.  Now I wish I had a 1/72nd scale Italeri V-22 Osprey kit in the stash to check fit with the Testors'/Italeri OV-10 Bronco. 
« Last Edit: December 20, 2014, 12:58:01 PM by Jeffry Fontaine »
"Every day we hear about new studies 'revealing' what should have been obvious to sentient beings for generations; 'Research shows wolverines don't like to be teased" -- Jonah Goldberg

Offline GTX_Admin

  • Evil Administrator bent on taking over the Universe!
  • Administrator - Yep, I'm the one to blame for this place.
  • Whiffing Demi-God!
    • Beyond the Sprues
Re: Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2012, 07:47:20 AM »
Here's some:









All hail the God of Frustration!!!

Offline elmayerle

  • Its about time there was an Avatar shown here...
  • Über Engineer...at least that is what he tells us.
Re: Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2012, 01:10:01 PM »
Well, since I now work for Bell, I can say that there were studies for an attack aircraft using Model 609 mechanicals and structure (I saw a rendering over a co-worker's desk).  Meanwhile, I'm more actively involved with developments and projects on the V-22. 

A couple thoughts, since the V-22 is replacing the CH-46 in USMC service, how about a V-22 in three-tone green splinter camouflage replacing the equivalent V-107-II in Swedish service or an OD V-22 with hinomarus doing the same in Japanese service.

Of course, if you're thinking bigger, there's always the Quad-Tilt-Rotor which could be modelled using a C-130 fuselage (alternatively, for grins, use an AN-12 fuselage to get the tailgunner position).

Offline Jeffry Fontaine

  • Unaffiliated Independent Subversive...and the last person to go for a trip on a Mexicana dH Comet 4
  • Global Moderator
  • His stash is able to be seen from space...
    • SketchUp 3D Warehouse - My Digital Models
Re: Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2012, 01:32:57 PM »
Well, since I now work for Bell, I can say that there were studies for an attack aircraft using Model 609 mechanicals and structure (I saw a rendering over a co-worker's desk).  Meanwhile, I'm more actively involved with developments and projects on the V-22. 

A couple thoughts, since the V-22 is replacing the CH-46 in USMC service, how about a V-22 in three-tone green splinter camouflage replacing the equivalent V-107-II in Swedish service or an OD V-22 with hinomarus doing the same in Japanese service.

Of course, if you're thinking bigger, there's always the Quad-Tilt-Rotor which could be modelled using a C-130 fuselage (alternatively, for grins, use an AN-12 fuselage to get the tailgunner position).


Graeme Davidson did some nice profiles of the V-22 in various schemes for different nations.  One of which was the JASDF and the other was for Sweden in the splinter camouflage.  Since Graeme is not yet a member of this little group any of his work might still reside over on the other forum unless they suffered the recent purge in which case they are gone. 

See this link for some Tilt Rotor Madness or click on the image to view the thread :^)



I linked a number of screen shots that I had originally shared a long time ago on the other forum before going into exile and have since been dredged up to share here with the other members. 
"Every day we hear about new studies 'revealing' what should have been obvious to sentient beings for generations; 'Research shows wolverines don't like to be teased" -- Jonah Goldberg

Offline GTX_Admin

  • Evil Administrator bent on taking over the Universe!
  • Administrator - Yep, I'm the one to blame for this place.
  • Whiffing Demi-God!
    • Beyond the Sprues
Re: Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2012, 03:26:57 PM »
Couldn't help myself:



And whilst the brain was switched off:



Regards,

Greg
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

Offline GTX_Admin

  • Evil Administrator bent on taking over the Universe!
  • Administrator - Yep, I'm the one to blame for this place.
  • Whiffing Demi-God!
    • Beyond the Sprues
Re: Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2012, 03:27:58 PM »
Speaking of V-22 whiffs, anyone remember these:












Regards,

Greg
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

Stargazer2006

  • Guest
Re: Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2012, 07:45:09 PM »
A few of my tilt-rotor whifs for your enjoyment... (I hope).



Grumman OV-1H Mohawk II



The Grumman OV-1H Mohawk II was the next logical step in the evolution of the reliable and flexible G-134 design. Featuring widened and shortened wings, it became the first operational tilt-rotor in the U.S. inventory when the Army took delivery of the first aircraft in June 1986. The G-134TR Mohawk II proved a valuable asset in difficult missions over Panama and Nicaragua, where the hostile environment made landing impossible to the original version. The Mohawk II was used for observation (OV-1H), as a rescue aircraft (HV-1H) and as an armed counter-insurgencency type (AV-1H). On top of the 110 new examples built by Grumman, most Mohawks remaining in the inventory were overhauled and brought up to "II" standard, bringing the total in operation up to 250. These versions, although externally similar to the new frames, presented a number of technical differences and were therefore designated with the use of the "J" suffix letter instead (OV-1J, HV-1J). There were no AV-1J conversions, as all 60 COIN aircraft were new from the factory. Finally, a small utility transport with deepened fuselage was produced in 12 examples (UV-1K). The last Mohawk II was retired from service in May 2003, making the G-134 family one of the most enduring designs in U.S. service.




Vought V-498 Bluebird VTOL



Some may remember my Vought-Sikorsky Shrike (then again you may not... lol). Well, anyway, here is another take on the LTV XC-142 concept, the LTV V-498 Bluebird (which derived its name from Vought's very first aircraft). It was produced in small numbers for a few regional airlines in the U.S. and Canada, such as the now defunct New York Airways, seen here.




Bell-Boeing CV-22C Long Osprey



The Bell-Boeing CV-22C Osprey is a new transport variant for the US Navy. It can be seen here on take-off trials from USS Harry Truman (CVN-75) in June 2015. The tough part in this picture was not to create the CV-22C from the regular version... it was coming up with a complete picture of the aircraft-carrier's tower! I had to rework it from several pictures...




Boeing-Lear CV-24A Hummingbird



What if Bell/Boeing's V-22 had not been the first operational VTOL? What if Boeing had teamed up with Learjet instead to offer an heir to the old X-19 concept and make it work as a liaison/VIP transport? This is what the fake advertisement above is all about.




And finally a tilt-duct... Not quite what this topic is about, but since someone included a tilt-duct above, I may as well add mine here.


Boeing-Bell XV-16A PLR VTOL



Contrary to popular belief, The V-22 Osprey is not the first joint effort by Bell and Boeing. In 1976, Boeing Vertol teamed up with Bell's Helicopter Division on a proposal for the Army's PLR (Power Lift Rotorcraft) program. Designated XV-16A in the VTOL series, this clean-looking and able performer combined Boeing's experience with transport helicopters and Bell's expertise in VTOL, in this case capitalizing on the tilt-duct research that culminated in the highly successful X-22A prototype a decade before. The PLR program was canceled despite a successful two-year evaluation phase because it was found that its advantages did not outweigh the 35% increase in costs from operating it instead of a conventional Chinook.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2012, 07:50:49 PM by Stargazer2006 »

Offline kitnut617

  • Measures the actual aircraft before modelling it...we have the photographic evidence.
  • I'd rather be dirtbike riding
Re: Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2012, 10:49:50 PM »
This pic below came from the USMC website sometime ago.  I've got a project started to do this but then realized I had gone in the wrong direction so I'm going to start again.  I'm going elaborate on it though as I don't really think having the rear engines behind the front ones like this will be workable (in RW).  Considering that all the engines are interconnected and have shafts running here, there, and everywhere, my idea will be to have two larger engines either side of the fin in an arrangement very similar to the CH-53 instead of the four in the wingtip pods.

Offline elmayerle

  • Its about time there was an Avatar shown here...
  • Über Engineer...at least that is what he tells us.
Re: Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2012, 12:09:31 AM »
I've got the kits somewhere in the stash here (still don't have everything sorted out from after my return) to cross the XV-22 with the Dash 8 for a civil tiltrotor.

Stargazer2006

  • Guest
Re: Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2012, 12:51:43 AM »
I've got the kits somewhere in the stash here (still don't have everything sorted out from after my return) to cross the XV-22 with the Dash 8 for a civil tiltrotor.

Mmmmm... Yummy!!!!!!!!!!!!

Offline finsrin

  • The Dr Frankenstein of the modelling world...when not hiding from SBA
  • Finds part glues it on, finds part glues it on....
Re: Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2012, 04:31:36 AM »
Is great bunch of tilt rotor/jet concepts.  Thanks for posting - do like reviewing them.  I have a tilt jet bash on the list to build.  Thinking of doing it STOL using a 30 to 45 degree max tilt.
Bill

Offline elmayerle

  • Its about time there was an Avatar shown here...
  • Über Engineer...at least that is what he tells us.
Re: Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
« Reply #11 on: January 09, 2012, 06:42:43 AM »
I was browsing Jose Fern's latest update in his discussion topic and found myself wondering what a kit-bash between an OV-10 Bronco and the V-22 Osprey would look like.  Retain the booms but lose the engines.  The booms could then be devoted to the landing gear and fuel plus whatever avionics that could not be accommodated in the fuselage proper.  At the wing tips - mount the engines and rotor components from the V-22.  The only thing that I can see at this point that could be a problem is the rotor blade clearance with the tail.  Now I wish I had a 1/72nd scale Italeri V-22 Osprey kit in the stash to check fit with the Testors'/Italeri OV-10 Bronco.

You'd like want to do a scalarama with the nacelles from a 1/72 V-22 on a 1/48 OV-10.  The OV-10's engines are rated at no more than 1000-1100 shp max while the the V-22's engines are rated at some 6000 shp.   I could see replacing the OV-10's engines with fairings covering either extra fuel tankage or various equipment fits.  Note that if you do this one, you need to also take the section of the V-22 wing immediately inboard of the engine as there's a lot going on there and some of the wing/engine fairing rotates with the engine nacelles.

Offline Jeffry Fontaine

  • Unaffiliated Independent Subversive...and the last person to go for a trip on a Mexicana dH Comet 4
  • Global Moderator
  • His stash is able to be seen from space...
    • SketchUp 3D Warehouse - My Digital Models
Re: Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
« Reply #12 on: January 09, 2012, 12:58:46 PM »
I was browsing Jose Fern's latest update in his discussion topic and found myself wondering what a kit-bash between an OV-10 Bronco and the V-22 Osprey would look like.  Retain the booms but lose the engines.  The booms could then be devoted to the landing gear and fuel plus whatever avionics that could not be accommodated in the fuselage proper.  At the wing tips - mount the engines and rotor components from the V-22.  The only thing that I can see at this point that could be a problem is the rotor blade clearance with the tail.  Now I wish I had a 1/72nd scale Italeri V-22 Osprey kit in the stash to check fit with the Testors'/Italeri OV-10 Bronco.

You'd like want to do a scalarama with the nacelles from a 1/72 V-22 on a 1/48 OV-10.  The OV-10's engines are rated at no more than 1000-1100 shp max while the the V-22's engines are rated at some 6000 shp.   I could see replacing the OV-10's engines with fairings covering either extra fuel tankage or various equipment fits.  Note that if you do this one, you need to also take the section of the V-22 wing immediately inboard of the engine as there's a lot going on there and some of the wing/engine fairing rotates with the engine nacelles.

That was my intention.  1/48th scale Testor's OV-10 Bronco mated up with a 1/72nd scale Italeri V-22 :^)

As much as I like the idea of "More Power" for the Bronco it would be a challenge to do so with the 48th scale V-22 parts since the blades would conflict in their arcs over the center of the fuselage.  The smaller diameter rotors on the 72nd scale V-22 might work a bit better for what I have in mind.  Just need to find the 1/72nd scale V-22 kit in order to do the check-fit. 
"Every day we hear about new studies 'revealing' what should have been obvious to sentient beings for generations; 'Research shows wolverines don't like to be teased" -- Jonah Goldberg

Offline elmayerle

  • Its about time there was an Avatar shown here...
  • Über Engineer...at least that is what he tells us.
Re: Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
« Reply #13 on: January 10, 2012, 08:35:25 AM »
Don't forget that the V-22 is rather larger than the OV-10.  That almost makes such a mixing necessary.  I note that there is one 1/72 V-22 on eBay right now, but it's not cheap at all.

Offline LemonJello

  • MARPAT Master
  • Member number 100...WooHoo!!!
Re: Tilt-Rotor Aircraft
« Reply #14 on: January 11, 2012, 11:25:17 AM »
As some of you know, I've done a couple of tilt-rotor creations: a 1/48 "spectre" type gunship and a kitbash of a 1/48 OV-1 Mohawk and a 1/72 V-22 into an escort for the vanilla V-22. 

I've got at least 4 more of the 1/48 Ospreys, only one of which will be done up as a USMC battle taxi.  I have plans to work one up as a US Coast Guard rescue bird with a hoist (or two), inflatable life raft canisters and even a zodiac on the tail ramp ready to deploy. And I love the Canadian SAR profile in yellow with the red stripes down the sides, so that's a definite possibility at some point.   I've seen a suggestion somewhere to make one as a heavy lift bird like the sky crane.