Author Topic: Gekko's Profiles  (Read 152372 times)

Offline ChernayaAkula

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #25 on: December 21, 2011, 05:05:13 AM »
This J-10 is gorgeous!!!   :in-love:


They all are!
I'm kinda partial to the Russian one and intend to build that one some day. My backstory would be that the Russian Federation breaks up into two (or more) states, with the one in the Far East allied with the Chinese.
Cheers,
Moritz

"The appropriate response to reality is to go insane!"

Offline Gekko1

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #26 on: December 22, 2011, 03:03:17 AM »
 ;D lol, yeah I'm going backwards through time, from my oldest to my latest. But I may add some of my brand new ones in the mix just to upset some people!

Cheers

Richard.

Offline Gekko1

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #27 on: December 22, 2011, 03:07:41 AM »
Cheers guys!











Richard.

Offline BadersBusCompany

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #28 on: December 22, 2011, 06:07:21 AM »
I'm stunned   :slow: The J-10s are superb  :in-love:
Driving trains when I'd rather be drawing planes!!

Offline Gekko1

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #29 on: December 22, 2011, 10:54:43 AM »
Why is Mav's profile page locked?

Offline taiidantomcat

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #30 on: December 22, 2011, 11:32:07 AM »
Top notch as always!! Never get tired of your profiles
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Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #31 on: December 22, 2011, 03:50:22 PM »
Why is Mav's profile page locked?

I don't know.  Neither I or any of the Mods did it.  I can only assume John did it himself - I have also asked him regarding but am still awaiting an answer.

Regards,

Greg
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Offline Gekko1

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #32 on: December 22, 2011, 06:06:58 PM »
Why is Mav's profile page locked?

I don't know.  Neither I or any of the Mods did it.  I can only assume John did it himself - I have also asked him regarding but am still awaiting an answer.

Regards,

Greg

Hmmm. That's odd. Beyond The Sprues first mystery. ???

Offline Gekko1

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #33 on: December 22, 2011, 06:08:48 PM »








Cheers

Richard.

Offline Bladerunner

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #34 on: December 22, 2011, 08:48:46 PM »
Woohoo!  :)
The African Lightnings look great! Especially the last one.

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #35 on: December 23, 2011, 03:28:44 AM »
Why is Mav's profile page locked?

I don't know.  Neither I or any of the Mods did it.  I can only assume John did it himself - I have also asked him regarding but am still awaiting an answer.

Regards,

Greg

Hmmm. That's odd. Beyond The Sprues first mystery. ???

Mystery solved - case of fat fingers
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

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But you can make the Bastard work for it.

Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #36 on: December 23, 2011, 04:13:48 AM »
The J-10s, as ever, are great!  :yarr:

Offline Gekko1

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #37 on: December 24, 2011, 02:34:44 AM »

Mystery solved - case of fat fingers

 :)

Offline Gekko1

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #38 on: December 24, 2011, 02:36:37 AM »
 :yarr:





Cheers

Richard.

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #39 on: December 24, 2011, 03:42:00 AM »
Are those Barbary Coast planes?  Nice!

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Gekko1

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #40 on: December 25, 2011, 07:48:49 PM »
Are those Barbary Coast planes?  Nice!

Cheers,

Logan

All I remember is that there was a pirate theme on 'the other site' and these were my versions.

Cheers

Richard.

Offline Gekko1

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #41 on: December 25, 2011, 07:51:53 PM »








Cheers

Richard.

Offline sotoolslinger

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #42 on: December 26, 2011, 01:04:05 AM »
Beautiful stuff much love for those splinter camo's :in-love:

Offline JoseFern

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #43 on: December 26, 2011, 06:58:27 AM »
Excellent batch of Lightnings and Rhinos!  ;D

I like the Navy roundel on the last FG.1.

Offline Gekko1

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #44 on: December 26, 2011, 11:41:27 AM »








Cheers

Richard.

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #45 on: December 27, 2011, 04:35:59 AM »
Some that Richard and I collaborated on:

Saudi Phantoms:

The Royal Saudi Air Force (RSAF) was established in 1950 during the reign of Abd al Aziz. During its initial years, the RSAF was influenced chiefly by the British, who provided aircraft and advisers and helped train Saudi pilots and maintenance personnel in the Kingdom and in Britain. This influence continued when in the early 1970s, the RSAF was seeking a strike aircraft to compliment its English Electric Lightning F.53s.


RSAF FGR. 51 in its original colour scheme.

In 1972 the first of 114 Spey engined Phantom FGR.Mk 2s were delivered to the RSAF (officially, these were referred to as Phantom FGR. 51s, though essentially they were identical to the RAF’s own FGR.Mk 2s).


This RSAF FGR. 51 wares an experimental scheme as tested in late 1989.

In mid-1988, it was announced that as part of a huge transaction under Project Al Yamamah, Saudi Arabia would acquire Tornado fighters from Britain in their strike and air defence configurations. This effectively resulted in both the Lightnings and the Phantoms being replaced. However, due to delays in the delivery of the Tornadoes and the higher priority given to replacing the Lightnings, the Phantoms remained in frontline service well into the 1990s.


This RSAF FGR. 51 wares the latest scheme as used during Desert Storm, it was responsible for shooting down an Iraqi Su-24 Fencer and Mirage F.1EQ!

Their highpoint of service undoubtedly being in 1991 during the first Gulf War to liberate Kuwait when RSAF Phantoms flew numerous strike and close air support missions.

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Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #46 on: December 27, 2011, 04:37:51 AM »
Another collaboration.

Pakistan

The Pakistan Air Force (PAF – the ‘Royal’ having been prefix Royal was removed in 1956) has had a long and proud history, having served with distinction during numerous wars with its larger neighbor India. In 1979 the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan. With the war being critical to Pakistan's national sovereignty and integrity, the PAF once again sought out modernization, including the procurement of new generation fighter aircraft - this was eventually satisfied by the purchase of 28 General Dynamics F-16A and 12 F-16B in 1981. Between 1986 and 1988 the PAF F-16s took part in frequent skirmishes with Soviet and Afghan aircraft.



However, times change, and in 1990 Pakistan was hit by American military embargoes in response to its nuclear weapons development. These embargoes prevented the Pakistan Air Force from acquiring a further 71 new-built F-16s that had been ordered. However, all was not lost. Via a deal that, still to this day has not been fully revealed (despite two Royal Commissions and a US Congress investigation), an arrangement was made whereby the PAF would acquire, with the assistance of un-named US interests, 50 ex-RAF Spey engined Phantom FGR.Mk 2s.



Following an upgrade program in Pakistan (and assisted by companies from both the UK and France), the first of these entered service in late 1992. This upgrade mainly involved re-lifing the airframe as well as completely overhauling the RR Spey engines. A few years later, a further, more extensive update was undertaken whereby the Phantoms were upgraded with digital cockpits and FLIR pods (greatly enhancing the air-to-surface precision strike capability).



In recent years, Pakistan has once again been ‘welcomed in from the cold’ (especially so since the events of Sept 11). This has allowed the PAF to once start considering various options in order to replace its ageing aircraft fleet, with the JF-17 (a joint production between Pakistan and China) and US made F-16 fighter jets as the top contenders for a Phantom replacement. Though given that the Phantoms were only relatively recently upgraded, there has been a strong call from within the PAF, to keep the Phantoms in service alongside the new aircraft.
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Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #47 on: December 27, 2011, 04:40:47 AM »
Yet another.

Royal New Zealand Air Force F-4K Phantom.

During the late 1960s, the Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) was searching for a replacement for its English Electric Canberras. The 1965 Defence Review had recommended the replacement of the RNZAF’s Canberra force by 1970, and indicated that the new aircraft should be for a close air support role. Given the lessons of the war in Vietnam at that time, defence planners preferred the F-4 Phantom. However, economic factors appeared to be swaying the Government towards a purchase of modified A-4F Skyhawks. At the last moment though (quite literally - the same day as the A-4 order was to be signed), the former motherland (UK) stepped in with a compromise deal. In order to spread the development costs for its own RR Spey engined F-4 development, they made an offer of a special ‘Commonwealth only’ deal for a batch of brand new Spey engined Phantom FGR.Mk 2s. These were essentially identical to those then entering service with the RAF. In RNZAF service though, they would be referred to as the F-4K (the K being for ‘Kiwi’).


F-4K Phantom, 75 Squadron, Ohakea, 1971.

The entire purchase of 14 aircraft (10 F-4Ks and 4 TF-4Ks (this being a dedicated, though combat capable trainer variant)) were shipped to New Zealand aboard an aircraft carrier in 1970. The aircraft were operated by 75 Sqn, but conversion and initial strike training were passed to 14 Sqn. The conversion role reverted to 75 Sqn in 1975, with 14 Sqn moving to purely Strikemaster operations. The conversion role was further changed in 1984, passing to 2 Sqn when it was reformed at Ohakea on December 11, 1984. The creation of a new Phantom squadron becoming possible with the purchase of ten ex-RAF FGR.Mk 2s (8 F-4s and 2 TF-4s) aircraft in 1984.


F-4K Kahu, 75 Squadron, Nowra NAS, N.S.W., Australia, 1986.

Under project KAHU, all aircraft updated to the F-4K Kahu standard, essentially by adopting the avionics from the F-16 Fighting Falcon, giving them the ability to use laser guided bombs, as well as AGM-65 Maverick and AIM-9L Sidewinder missiles. Kahu is Māori for falcon.


F-4K Kahu, 75 Squadron, Ohakea, 1998. This scheme proved very unpopular with Malaysian and Thai pilots during overseas exercises, the Asian pilots complaining that it was too difficult to locate! They asked the RNZAF to make the scheme more hi-vis, the RNZAF refused.

The survivors were retired in 2001 amidst much controversy. The aircraft are currently being stored at RNZAF Base Woodburne, just outside of Blenheim in the South Island.


F-4K Kingfisher, 75 Squadron, Ohakea, 2001. This was a test scheme for the F-4K that was to be implemented for specialised aircraft used in the anti-shipping role in conjunction with the Harpoon and Penguin anti ship missiles.
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Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #48 on: December 27, 2011, 04:44:08 AM »
They keep coming...

FGR.2's over the Nam.

In June 1966, with the development of the new RR Spey engined F-4 Phantom FGR.Mk 2 under way for the RAF, the USAF made the decision to also purchase at least a squadron’s worth directly ‘off the drawing board’ . This decision was largely based on the supposedly greater performance that would be available with the new engine. On paper, using Speys looked like a great idea, as they were more powerful than the J79s fitted normally, and more fuel-efficient. In reality, these predicted benefits did not translate to real life, and in fact the F-4M (as they were designated in USAF service) were actually poorer performers than the standard J79 powered version. Never-the-less, a purchase is a purchase and the USAF now found themselves with a squadron of F-4Ms.


F-4M Phantom, 10th fighter Commando Squadron, Bien Hoa Air Base, 1967.

These were assigned to 10th Fighter Commando Squadron and sent to Vietnam for a full up combat evaluation. Though successful, the F-4M’s lower performance wasn’t generally liked by the USAF pilots and the aircraft were subsequently turned over to the air force of South Vietnam, which previously had only slow A-1 Skyraider and A-37 Dragonfly attack aircraft. With the step up in performance that this entailed, the South Vietnamese crew couldn’t have been happier.


F-4M Phantom, 1st Fighter Squadron, South Vietnamese Air Force (VNAF), Bien Hoa Air Base, 1973. Seen here in an experimental camouflage scheme seen on several of the 1st's Phantoms.

Sadly, the South Vietnamese F-4Ms only operated for a few years before the country was eventually overrun by the North Vietnamese forces. Ironically, several of the aircraft were captured and used operationally by the NVAF, in particular against Khmer Rouge. In fact, even as late as 1995, it was reported that a few F-4Ms were still in use – they being eventually replaced by Su-27s.


North Vietnamese F-4M Phantom, seen here after being brought back to flying condition following the cannibalisation of several unserviceable VNAF Phantoms, 1976


NVAF F-4M Phantom, 1994, in standard air superiority scheme.

One further interesting twist to this story was the use of the F-4M by both the Polish and Soviet militaries. Several of the F-4Ms left-over post Vietnam War were apparently exported to Poland and Russia for advanced study of US aviation technology. It is reported that both of these countries operated at least one in flying condition – though there is speculation that this may have in fact been the same aircraft.


Polish F/A-4M Phantomski, used for ground attack mission testing, 1976.


Soviet F-4M Phantomski, used in the "Topgunski" role by a Top Secret test unit, 1977.
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Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Gekko's Profiles
« Reply #49 on: December 27, 2011, 04:46:48 AM »
More...

Phantoms over Oz!

On the night of 12th May 1975 the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) suffered perhaps its greatest blow. The flagship of the fleet, the Majestic class, light aircraft carrier, HMAS Melbourne was completely gutted by fire during a major refit at Garden Island. Luckily, as there were minimal personnel on board at the time, there was no loss of life. The cause was never proven with theories ranging from a simple industrial accident through to sabotage by an anti-military protestor.


FGR.3 of VF-805 in her delivery scheme of gull grey over white, 1976.

Given that only a few months prior, the carrier had proven its extreme usefulness when it had assisted in the post-Cyclone Tracy disaster recovery operations at Darwin, there was strong public support for rapidly replacing the carrier.


VF-805's Phantoms soon started appearing in the wrap around scheme adopted by the Navy's A-4G Skyhawks, 1977.

However, rapidly acquiring a new carrier is not something that one does easily. Ideally the RAN would have liked a new purpose built carrier, but this would take time (and many overseas junkets). In the short term, a solution was found by acquiring (at a greatly discounted price – the British Government being glad to find a buyer) the relatively recently decommissioned HMS Eagle. Quickly brought back to full operational condition, the newly re-commissioned HMAS Darwin (a moral boosting, recognition to the recently devastated city) reached Australia just in time for Christmas 1976. Aboard her were 24 newly acquired Phantom FGR Mk.3s (the decision having already been made to replace the A-4G Skyhawks with something more potent) of 805 Squadron RAN FAA.


By 1979 VF-805's Phantoms began to take on US Navy type low-viz colour schemes.

These were meant to have been identical to the RN FG.1s, but a paperwork mix-up resulted in the incorrect aircraft being craned aboard the deck in Devonport. When the mistake was discovered, it was decided to simply modify the aircraft back into carrier capable fighters. This largely involved the refitting of the unique, double-height, folding nose gear for a higher AOA on catapult launch; the reinforced main gear and arresting hook; and the radome that could be hinged back to allow the aircraft to fit down the smaller elevators on the carrier. Following these mods, the aircraft were re-designated as Phantom FGR Mk.3s. Complimenting the fighters aboard the carrier were 6 of the existing Grumman S-2E/G Trackers as well as Westland Sea King Mk 50 helicopters.


With tensions between Australia and Indonesia on the rise the Defene Department decided to re-camouflage the Navy's tactical aircraft in a scheme better suited to low level over water operations, 1981.

In 1982, the new carrier selection decision had finally been made and the HMAS Darwin was replaced by the first of two new carriers (these being based on the new American CVV design), HMAS Gallipoli (soon to be joined by the HMAS Kokoda). Since these new carriers were unable to accommodate the Phantom FGR Mk.3s (they would carry the new SAAB JA-37N ‘Cyclone’ fighters), it was decided to transfer the Phantoms to the RAAF.


The first RAAF unit to get to play with the FGR.3 Phantom was the Aircraft Reasearch and Development Unit in their striking orange and white colours!

These were allocated to the newly re-established 2 Squadron, which would now become a specialised anti-shipping unit armed with AGM-84 Harpoon ASMs.


Exercise Pitch Black '84 saw this RAAF Number 2 Squadron FGR.3 Phantom 'borrow' some paint being used by 38 Squadron on their Caribou aircraft for test and evaluation purposes. For some strange reason this Phantom is still carrying its Navy seriel codes?


Here we see another of 2 Squadron's Phantoms wearing a short lived "exercise scheme" during Pitch Black '84.

These continued to serve through until 1989, when they too were replaced with the RAAF’s own variant of the SAAB Cyclone.


Here we see 2 Squadrons initial anti-shipping scheme. However it was soon realised that the scheme was far too light for over water operations, 1985.


2 Squadron's final scheme for over water anti-shipping operations was this darker blue/grey scheme, 1987.
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

You can't outrun Death forever.
But you can make the Bastard work for it.