Author Topic: Simmie's unfinished rough outlines  (Read 2083 times)

Online simmie

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Simmie's unfinished rough outlines
« on: March 01, 2013, 08:58:52 AM »
Hi there

My intention with this thread is post those rough outlines for stories that have run out of steam.

If anyone has any ideas to move them along, just post then here.

Simmie
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Online simmie

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Re: Simmie's unfinished rough outlines
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2013, 09:04:48 AM »
To assist in the funding of the SST (Boeing 2707) project the USAF SAC are persuaded into considering it as a strategic bomber to replace the B-52.

With windows removed, extra fuel tanks in the cabin, stand off weapons could be hung under the inner wing area and along the under side of the fuselage.  In addition the forward baggage areas could be used as conventional weapons bays.

Service entry in the late 70ís as AMST.
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Online simmie

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Re: Simmie's unfinished rough outlines
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2013, 09:10:43 AM »
The XFV-12A begins its hover trials in July 1978 and it is quickly clear that the programme is in serious difficulties as the aircraft refuses to lift off the ground.

Rockwell International launches itself into trying to save the project.  The design team works at attempting to sort out the thrust augmentation system.  However, management attempting to hedge their bets forms a separate team to carry out all the required changes to turn the 2nd prototype as a CTOL aircraft.

A small group of young engineering interns gather in a nearby bar, one evening, to express their lack of faith in this decision.  In particular they are unhappy about the lost of the aircrafts V/STOL capability.  As the night draws on, and the bears flow, the interns try to frash out a solution to the problem.  Different methods of lifting the aircraft are thrown into the discussion and slowly eliminated, until they are left with the only workable option.  The simple approach is found to be the best, they agree on trying to scheme a Pegasus variant.

Slowly their informal discussion starts to draw them together in to a weekend project group.  Meeting after office hours and on weekends they use the company's resources to gather information from company brochures and publications about Pegasus, they cover both 3 and 4 points of lift.  They eventually choose a 3 point Pegasus 15 Mk.201 (F402-RF-403).

The front nozzles lie in the trench running the length of the lower edge of the fuselage, left by the removal of the ducting which supplied the exhaust gasses to the nozzles in the canard.
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Online simmie

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Re: Simmie's unfinished rough outlines
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2013, 09:12:51 AM »
Ploughshares into swords
Armstrong Whitworth AW.27 Ensign
Aircraft re-engining uses British engines instead of the Wright Cyclone to save upon foreign currency.  Candidate engines include the Napier Dagger, Bristol Mercury/Hercules, Rolls Royce Kestrel/Merlin and Armstrong Whitworth Deerhound.  The eventual selection of the Bristol Hercules was simply due to it having the required power and being an air cooled radial that required the least amount of work to the airframe.  The installation was tested on the prototype AW.29 light bomber.

Bombs slung under the central fuselage on external racks three bombs wide.  The two power operated turrets are mounted over the escape hatches in the fuselage roof, one in-line with the wing leading edge, the other above the passenger door.  The bomb aimersí position is fitted under the nose of the aircraft.

The patrol version has racks are fitted under the outer wings for depth charges, and ASV radar.  Additional fuel tanks are fitted in the main passenger cabin.  The conversion carried out is along similar lines to Focke Wulf FW200 Condor.

De Havilland DH-91 Albatross.
The aircraft was originally built as an airliner and as trans-Atlantic mail plane.

Upon outbreak of war a number of mail planes were ordered as long range maritime patrol aircraft, they were also deployed as meteorology reconnaissance aircraft.

Operating out of the bases at Sumborough, Stornaway, Benbecula, NI, Cornwall, The Azores, Bermuda and Keflavik.

A ventral bath, just behind wing trailing edge houses the bomb aimersí position.  Dorsal gun position a sliding perspex panel at 2nd roof escape hatch.  Side gun positions at rearmost windows on both sides.

Bombs and depth charges hung on wing spar under fuselage.

Re-engined with Bristol Mercury air cooled radials, this cutting down to a minimum the changes required to the airframe.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2013, 07:05:57 PM by simmie »
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