Author Topic: 3D Printing Tips and Techniques  (Read 1669 times)

Offline Frank3k

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Re: 3D Printing Tips and Techniques
« Reply #25 on: September 01, 2021, 10:08:41 AM »
It isn't obvious how to use the PrusaSlicer. This blog post covers some of the basics. There's an online knowledge base as well.

UVTools is also not obvious, but it does an amazing job at fixing print files and can open most printer file formats.

UVTools comes with printer profiles for PrusaSlicer that have to be installed before you try to slice your file in PrusaSlicer.

There's a UVTools workflow that is helpful... but you'll have to mouse around to find the menu commands in the program.
There's also a series of videos on UVTools, but they aren't tutorials.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2021, 10:12:31 AM by Frank3k »

Offline LemonJello

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Re: 3D Printing Tips and Techniques
« Reply #26 on: October 13, 2021, 09:27:43 PM »
I may have convinced the Lady LemonJello to acquire a 3D printer for my Christmas gift this year.

I was thinking of going with the Mars 2 Pro, seems like a good starting size for what I think I'll be printing (1/48 and 1/35 bits-n-bobs).

Is the Mercury Plus washing/curing machine a "must have" or more of a "nice to have"?

Offline Frank3k

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Re: 3D Printing Tips and Techniques
« Reply #27 on: October 13, 2021, 11:31:20 PM »
The Mars 2 Pro is a good printer and has a monochrome screen, so it will print much faster and the screen will last longer than the older RGB screens.

Washing and curing is probably one of the most annoying parts of 3D resin printing. You can make your own curing station with UV LEDs or a nail curing UV station (or even putting the print in the Sun) and you can manually wash the part in isopropyl or put it in an ultrasonic bath.

I thought wash & cure stations were just "nice to have" but even though I had streamlined the way I washed and cured parts, it was getting tedious. I bought an Anycubic wash and cure station (at the time it was both cheaper than the Elegoo and in stock) and it really made a huge difference. Now I print, drip of the excess resin, put the part in the wash tank, give it a few minutes wash and depending on the part, either cut off the supports and cure or just cure with the supports. The machine does an even cure and I don't get pockets of partly cured resin.

Offline LemonJello

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Re: 3D Printing Tips and Techniques
« Reply #28 on: October 14, 2021, 03:54:58 AM »
Excellent! I shall send the links to both to the interested parties and hope to find both under the tree this year.

Also, Blender will be downloaded/installed on the home laptop so I can get ahead of the designing curve. 

Thanks!

Offline robunos

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Re: 3D Printing Tips and Techniques
« Reply #29 on: October 14, 2021, 04:46:54 AM »
I can only second what Frank says about the Mercury Plus, with the qualifier that as I've been using the water-soluble resin, I tend to wash my prints in the sink . . .


cheers,
Robin.
By the pricking of my thumbs, Something Whiff-y this way comes . . .

Offline Frank3k

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Re: 3D Printing Tips and Techniques
« Reply #30 on: October 14, 2021, 11:00:10 AM »
Uncured resin down the sink isn't a great idea... just wash it in a container of water and set it outside in the Sun to cure the resin.

@LemonJello - there are some excellent tutorials for Blender on Youtube. Make sure they're recent (for version 2.8 or higher).

The Blender Foundation videos are good, up to the chapter where they introduce armatures and they don't mention how to get the test files, or load them. Truly infuriating.