Author Topic: Humble Motor Museum 2016 Additions  (Read 1390 times)

Offline ScranJ51

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Humble Motor Museum 2016 Additions
« on: August 20, 2016, 01:51:48 PM »
With the onset of winter here in Oz the Humble Motor Museum staff have been locked away in their centrally heated workshop working on this years batch of exhibits.

Today they rolled out two completed cars:

Benetton B188

B188-1 by David Freeman, on Flickr

B188-3 by David Freeman, on Flickr

B188-4 by David Freeman, on Flickr

BENETTON B188
The Benetton B188 was a Formula One racing car designed by Rory Byrne and raced by Benetton team in the 1988 Formula One season and in the first half of the 1989 Formula One season.

Benetton was effectively the works team as they had exclusive use of the Ford DFR V8 engine for 1988. Driven in 1988 by Belgian Thierry Boutsen and Italian Alessandro Nannini, the B188 was a consistent performer and was usually the class of the atmospheric cars. Boutsen scored 27 points, including 5 podium finishes, to claim 4th in the Drivers Championship while Nannini scored 12 points, including his first ever podium with 3rd at the British Grand Prix. Overall with the B188, Benetton finished 3rd in the constructors championship with 39 points.  The B188 was also used in the first half of 1989 before being replaced by the B189.  The car on display was that used by Boutsen.


Honda Ra272

Ra272-1 by David Freeman, on Flickr

Ra272-2 by David Freeman, on Flickr

Ra272-3 by David Freeman, on Flickr

Ra272-4 by David Freeman, on Flickr

HONDA RA 272
The Honda RA272 was used by the team in the 1965 Formula One season.  A successor to the Honda RA271, the RA272 was noticeable mainly for its technically-advanced (though rather wide and heavy) 48-valve 1,495.28 cc V12 engine (58.1 x 47.0 mm), a water-cooled, engine transversely mounted unit which reportedly gave 230 bhp (170 kW) at 13,000 rpm. The engine was safe to 14,000 rpm, which was unusually high for a 1960s engine design. The Honda V12 had staggering acceleration and often led the race into the opening lap after leaving the stationary starting grid. The car on display led the 1965 Mexican Grand Prix  from start to finish, driven by Richie Ginther, making it the first Japanese car to win a Formula One Grand Prix.

You will notice in the last picture the Humble Staff have replaced the rear body panels with clear perspex so a view of the unique engine configuration can clearly be seen.

At least three more cars are currently under restoration     :D
« Last Edit: March 06, 2018, 08:05:20 AM by ScranJ51 »
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Re: Humble Motor Museum 2016 Additions
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2016, 05:03:00 AM »
 :)
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

Offline ScranJ51

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Re: Humble Motor Museum 2016 Additions
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2016, 11:33:44 AM »
Another car has come out of the workshop and into the galleries:


Leyton House CG901B:

LH CG901B-1 by David Freeman, on Flickr

LH CG901B-2 by David Freeman, on Flickr

LH CG901B-3 by David Freeman, on Flickr

LH CG901B-4 by David Freeman, on Flickr

LEYTON HOUSE CG901B
The Leyton House CG901 was a Formula One racing car designed by Adrian Newey for the 1990 Formula One World Championship. Five chassis were built and were powered by the Judd EV 3.5 litre V8 engine. Chassis 001 was subsequently modified mid-season to accommodate the Ilmor 2175A engine the team used in 1991. The drivers for 1990 were the highly rated Ivan Capelli and Maurício Gugelmin.  The CG901 appeared in two distinct specifications, the early season A spec and the mid to late season B spec. The change was largely an aerodynamic update to correct design errors incurred as a result of erroneous data from the team's wind tunnel. The basis for the car was an evolution of the CG891 of 1989 but with even less compromise from an aerodynamic stand point. This approach caused the car to be extremely sensitive to pitch and roll necessitating a very stiff set-up.

The "tub" is a monocoque type of carbon fibre construction encapsulating the driver, front suspension dampers and fuel cell. The cockpit area was reputed to be very small and cramped, in fact on the lower portion of the tub two external blisters are visible to allow the driver's heels to fit into the narrow space. The dampers were located in front of the driver's feet and were of 2 way adjustable Koni type. The dampers were actuated via rockers by pushrods from the front uprights. The detachable nose section incorporates the front wing which was bolted from the underside and sat proud of the nose itself.
The engine is attached to the tub via studs and nuts and acted as a fully stressed member. The cooling system was configured in a similar manner to that of the Indycars Newey had designed prior to his involvement with Formula One. The water system is composed of two large coolers that fed through a water oil heat exchanger in the right hand sidepod.

The gearbox was attached to the engine through a bell housing that formed the lower part of the engine oil tank, the upper part being a sculpted carbon fibre affair. Of six speed longitudinal configuration the gearbox differed to most conventional layouts in that the selector mechanism was located at the front of the assembly. The rear suspension like the front utilised pushrods compressing the horizontally mounted Koni dampers via rockers.

The most striking feature of the CG901 was its aerodynamics, it was if nothing else a very beautiful car. The B specification update included a new design of floor building on the established practice of an exhaust fed diffuser. The engine cover was extremely small and very narrow following the curves of the tub. The electronics package was principally supplied by Zytek Engineering however the car did utilize a Marelli ignition package for at least part of the season.

The performance of the CG901 was very poor before the introduction of the B specification car at the French Grand Prix of 1990. In both France and Britain both Capelli and Gugelmin showed dominant form bewildering their much better-funded rivals. For the remainder of the season performance remained patchy and was plagued with reliability problems.


« Last Edit: March 06, 2018, 08:06:56 AM by ScranJ51 »
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Offline ScranJ51

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Re: Humble Motor Museum 2016 Additions
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2016, 11:38:45 AM »
The engineers will now turn their attentions to the next projects - not one but TWO Tyrrell P-34's and a Tyrrell 002

Tyrrell Bench by David Freeman, on Flickr
« Last Edit: March 06, 2018, 08:07:32 AM by ScranJ51 »
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Offline ScranJ51

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Re: Humble Motor Museum 2016 Additions
« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2016, 01:04:11 PM »
While waiting for the Tyrrells, the engineers rebuilt the museums second McLaren M23 - to depict the test vehicle used to display the new car to the media - in McLaren Orange:

M23-test-02 by David Freeman, on Flickr

M23-test-03 by David Freeman, on Flickr

M23-test-04 by David Freeman, on Flickr

M23-test-05 by David Freeman, on Flickr
« Last Edit: March 06, 2018, 08:09:18 AM by ScranJ51 »
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Offline ScranJ51

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Re: Humble Motor Museum 2016 Additions
« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2016, 01:07:48 PM »
The Museum also recently acquired a Ferrari F1-2000:

F1-2001-01 by David Freeman, on Flickr


F1-2001-02 by David Freeman, on Flickr

F1-2001-03 by David Freeman, on Flickr

F1-2001-04 by David Freeman, on Flickr
« Last Edit: March 06, 2018, 08:11:01 AM by ScranJ51 »
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Offline ScranJ51

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Re: Humble Motor Museum 2016 Additions
« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2016, 01:10:40 PM »
And, as promised earlier - the two Tyrrell P34's:

P34s-2 by David Freeman, on Flickr

P34-1-1 by David Freeman, on Flickr

P34-1-2 by David Freeman, on Flickr

P34-1-3 by David Freeman, on Flickr

P34-1-4 by David Freeman, on Flickr

P34-1-5 by David Freeman, on Flickr

P34-2-1 by David Freeman, on Flickr

P34-2-3 by David Freeman, on Flickr

P34-2-3-4 by David Freeman, on Flickr

P34-2-5 by David Freeman, on Flickr

TYRRELL P-34
The Tyrrell P34 (Project 34), otherwise known as the 'six-wheeler,' was a Formula One race car designed by Derek Gardner, Tyrrell's chief designer, as a response to new regulations due to come into force in 1976. The car used specially manufactured 10-inch diameter wheels and tyres at the front with two ordinary sized wheels at the back. The idea of the smaller front tyres was to increase air penetration and have a smaller 'frontal area' which would reduce drag.  However, smaller diameter tyres would have resulted in a loss of contact area between the rubber and the tarmac surface of the track and hence poorer mechanical grip for cornering. To remedy this, the P34 was given four 10-inch front wheels. Thanks to a complex suspension design, all four front wheels could be steered.

When unveiled, the cover was peeled away from the back forward and the collective gasps from the world's press said it all. Along with the Brabham BT46B "Fancar" developed in 1978, the six-wheeled Tyrrell was one of the two most radical entries ever to succeed in F1 competition, and has specifically been called the most recognizable design in the history of world motorsports.

It first ran in the Spanish GP, and proved to be very competitive. Both Jody Scheckter and Patrick Depailler were able to produce solid results with the car, but while Depailler praised the car continually, Scheckter realized it would only be temporarily competitive. The special Goodyear tyres were not being developed enough by the end of the season.  The P34's golden moment came in the Swedish Grand Prix. Scheckter and Depailler finished first and second (Scheckter’s car is the all blue vehicle, Depailler’s car from the Monaco GP is also on display here), and to date Scheckter is the only driver ever to win a race in a six-wheeled car. He left the team at the end of the season, insisting that the six-wheeler was "a piece of junk!"
« Last Edit: March 06, 2018, 08:14:54 AM by ScranJ51 »
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Online Brian da Basher

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Re: Humble Motor Museum 2016 Additions
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2016, 10:47:11 PM »
Wow those are some gorgeous racers!

It takes some real talent to get models looking that sharp! Nice work!

Brian da Basher

Offline ScranJ51

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Re: Humble Motor Museum 2016 Additions
« Reply #8 on: March 06, 2018, 08:16:31 AM »
re-imaged.

With respect to the Leyton House car shown above - here is the real thing - Taupo NZ Feb 2017

IMG_6640 by David Freeman, on Flickr

IMG_6752 by David Freeman, on Flickr
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