Author Topic: Wings of Zen  (Read 8272 times)

Offline Volkodav

  • Counts rivits with his abacus...
  • Much older now...but procrastinating about it
Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #15 on: March 16, 2016, 02:03:37 PM »
Nice, old Matchbox Tunnan?

Offline Camthalion

  • The man has done a pink tank...need we say more?!
Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #16 on: March 16, 2016, 07:16:21 PM »
Nice work.

Offline DFZ

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #17 on: March 16, 2016, 08:08:14 PM »
Thanks, guys!  :)

Nice, old Matchbox Tunnan?

Yup, it really was a nice surprise, i've read so many bad things about matchbox kits that i thought it would be a pig to put together, but i had no real problem with it.
It was also a bit of a nostalgic build as i'd destroyed one when i was 7 or 8 years old. ;D

Zen
 :icon_meditation:
"Stick and stones may brake some bones but a 3,57's gonna blow your damn head off!"

Offline Kelmola

  • Seeking motivation to start buillding the stash
Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #18 on: March 16, 2016, 09:41:49 PM »
Yup, it really was a nice surprise, i've read so many bad things about matchbox kits that i thought it would be a pig to put together, but i had no real problem with it.
A Matchbox kit is like a box of chocolate, you never know what you're going to get (unless you read the reviews not available back then, that is).

They did have their share of hilarious fails (not helped by the poor PTSD'd WW1 veteran digging trenches everywhere he could see) but some of their kits were remarkably accurate (at least for the time period) and for a while the only game in town for some subjects. Pretty much the only thing certain with their kit was that you would get a pilot figure to sit in the cockpit, but the detail level, weapons included, the shape of the kit, the accuracy of panel lines, etc. could be just about anything.

Of course, their tendency to include alternative parts for variants and/or decals for two or three (often even less common) schemes was a nice gentle push towards the world of whiffery ;)

Offline Volkodav

  • Counts rivits with his abacus...
  • Much older now...but procrastinating about it
Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #19 on: March 16, 2016, 10:14:52 PM »
Thanks, guys!  :)

Nice, old Matchbox Tunnan?

Yup, it really was a nice surprise, i've read so many bad things about matchbox kits that i thought it would be a pig to put together, but i had no real problem with it.
It was also a bit of a nostalgic build as i'd destroyed one when i was 7 or 8 years old. ;D

Zen
 :icon_meditation:

Built a Matchbox Tunnan back when I was at school (maybe even primary school), I remember painting it mostly white with midnight blue details in a very whiff scheme.  I recall being very pleased with it, also remember it didn't survive the day of the unsupervised toddler when a neighbour dropped in for a cup of coffee with my mother while I was at school, and her preschool son found his way into my room and retracted the under carriage on most of my collection.  When they eventually noticed him missing a search discovered him happily swooping various, now modified, aircraft around the room.  Ah the memories.

Offline DFZ

  • Bitten by the Viper...
Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #20 on: March 18, 2016, 07:36:54 AM »
[A Matchbox kit is like a box of chocolate, you never know what you're going to get (unless you read the reviews not available back then, that is).

They did have their share of hilarious fails (not helped by the poor PTSD'd WW1 veteran digging trenches everywhere he could see) but some of their kits were remarkably accurate (at least for the time period) and for a while the only game in town for some subjects. Pretty much the only thing certain with their kit was that you would get a pilot figure to sit in the cockpit, but the detail level, weapons included, the shape of the kit, the accuracy of panel lines, etc. could be just about anything.

Of course, their tendency to include alternative parts for variants and/or decals for two or three (often even less common) schemes was a nice gentle push towards the world of whiffery ;)

Now i'm not sure if i ever had this kit back when i was a kid or just remember the box from the toy store, so i didn't know what to expect besides what was said in the couple of reviews i read on this one and on the Tarangus A/B version. The Tarangus is a much better kit,and i think it can easily be upgraded to an E/F, but the Matchbox was very cheap, cost me 12 Euros with postage from the UK included, the Tarangus is at least twice as much without postage. But after building this one, i think i'm gonna try the Tarangus kit.  :)

Built a Matchbox Tunnan back when I was at school (maybe even primary school), I remember painting it mostly white with midnight blue details in a very whiff scheme.  I recall being very pleased with it, also remember it didn't survive the day of the unsupervised toddler when a neighbour dropped in for a cup of coffee with my mother while I was at school, and her preschool son found his way into my room and retracted the under carriage on most of my collection.  When they eventually noticed him missing a search discovered him happily swooping various, now modified, aircraft around the room.  Ah the memories.

Ouch!! All of them...  :o When i was 12, had one ruined by a younger cousin who just wanted to see how many parts it had... ???
Him and my Aunt were staying with us for a few days, he got into my room when i was out riding my bmx... when i got home and saw a wing on the entrance hall and further ahead was the cockpit section... i recognized my poor Tomcat and ran into my room to find him already holding my Prowler in his hands... almost made him swallow one of the Tomcat's wings but my mom stopped me before any real harm was done... i ended up being punished and my cousin got ice cream...  ;D As mentioned above, not sure if i had this kit back then but i wanted to build it anyway and i'm also going to buy the other kits i remember having back then. I know i had an Italeri F-4S and F-14A, Hasegawa EA-6B and i'm almost certain i had an Esci/Ertl  F-16 Electric Fighter... I also have short blurry flashes of an A-4 but again, not sure... Guess i'll have to find those and build them for some time-travelling down the memory lane... ;D

Zen
 :icon_meditation:
"Stick and stones may brake some bones but a 3,57's gonna blow your damn head off!"

Offline DFZ

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #21 on: March 20, 2016, 04:34:01 AM »
So, after 3 hours of decaling, a good coat of gloss varnish and another oner is almost ready to leave the bench! :)



Zen
 :icon_meditation:
"Stick and stones may brake some bones but a 3,57's gonna blow your damn head off!"

Offline Volkodav

  • Counts rivits with his abacus...
  • Much older now...but procrastinating about it
Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #22 on: March 20, 2016, 11:57:18 PM »
So, after 3 hours of decaling, a good coat of gloss varnish and another oner is almost ready to leave the bench! :)



Zen
 :icon_meditation:


That's well on the way to being a beauty!

Offline ysi_maniac

  • I will die understanding not this world
Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #23 on: March 21, 2016, 05:56:57 AM »
Gorgeous, indeed! :) :) :) :)

Offline DFZ

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #24 on: March 21, 2016, 08:07:51 AM »
Glad you like it, guys!  :)

Matte coat on and masks off!!  8)











All it's lacking is some "Boom Sticks"!! >:D

Zen
 :icon_meditation:
"Stick and stones may brake some bones but a 3,57's gonna blow your damn head off!"

Offline taiidantomcat

  • Plastic Origamist...and not too shabby with the painting either!
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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #25 on: March 21, 2016, 11:24:24 AM »
That looks great!!
"They know you can do anything, So the question is, what don't you do?"

-David Fincher

Offline DFZ

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #26 on: March 21, 2016, 08:58:28 PM »
"Stick and stones may brake some bones but a 3,57's gonna blow your damn head off!"

Offline DFZ

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #27 on: March 27, 2016, 07:46:49 AM »
PoAF Eurofighter Typhoon - 702 TFS "Escorpiões" , BA11 Beja, 2016


"In 1983, the Eurofighter program was composed of 5 collaborating countries, but in 1985, the French government decided to pull out of the project and preferred to support the development of the Dassault Rafale. The management group was faced with the need to find another partner to share the costs of development and also divide the production benefits. Portugal was to become an official EU country in 1986, and was in urging for new job opportunities for it's people. The creation and development of new industries was promoted and a good share of European funds were directed to new industrial parks outside of mass-populated areas.
 The Portuguese Air Force Generals were the first to take advantage of the situation, seeing an opportunity to be part of the development of modern warfare equipment which would be a major boost to its forces in the end, were it would put them among the best equipped air forces of the world for some time. 
The idea of entering the Eurofighter program, which had just lost a partner, was taken to the government, which appreciated the idea that the weapons industry was something that could make a lot of difference in the Gross Domestic Product of a country.
Decision was made to go ahead with the idea and present the proposal to the management board of the participating countries.
After some debate, the 4 original partners inform the Portuguese government that the participation would be accepted if the production share was equivalent to the country's economy when compared to the other 4, thus meaning they would get the smallest share.
The PT government admitting it is only fair, accepts and becomes the 5th partner in the program in 1987.
After the rough ride on the negotiations table to divide the work shares, Portugal and Spain both get 6,5%, Italy gets 21%, while Germany and Britain each getting 33% of the shares.
Built in Portugal would be the flight surfaces, including rudder, canards, ailerons, flaps and also the airbrake. A few small engine components were also attributed to a Portuguese company, which also got to build some parts of electronic and hydraulic systems.

The first deliveries began taking place in 2003, but the PoAF would still wait until 2006 to receive it's first 12 of 48 aircraft, two being twin-seat trainers. The first 5 PoAF pilots got their training from 2005 to 2006 at the RAF Coningsby air base with the No. 17 Squadron.
For the reception and operation of the new type, the 702 TFS "Escorpiões" was reactivated, after being disbanded since the end of the colonial war in Mozambique back in 1974, where it operated with the scorpion as name and symbol of their squadron.
Operating since 2006 at BA11 Beja air base, the PoAF Eurofighters would participate in various exercises around the world and see their first combat operations with the UN coalition in 2011 during the Libyan civil war."










Well, that's it for my airbrushing test subject, although it's not actually a "scheme", i'm actually pretty happy with the result.  :)
Sorry for the blurry pics, it was the best i could get... i really need to buy a camera...

Hope you like it and thanks for looking!  :)

Zen
 :icon_meditation:
« Last Edit: February 16, 2018, 02:03:53 AM by DFZ »
"Stick and stones may brake some bones but a 3,57's gonna blow your damn head off!"

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #28 on: March 28, 2016, 02:34:21 AM »
 :)
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

Offline DFZ

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #29 on: May 10, 2016, 07:37:50 AM »
"With the Battle of France in full swing, the U.K. and it's allies needed all the help they could get. With the early involvement of Portugal by the secret reactivation of the Windsor Treaty in May of 1940, some PoAF pilots soon found themselves going to England to help out the tired pilots of the RAF. Comprised of 22 pilots of the 1st FSW of Tancos's BA3, this help would be much appreciated by the the British pilots, as was the help of other voluntary pilots from other countries from Europe and around the globe.
As the war came to and end with the defeat of the Nazis, the return of troops to their nations began almost immediately and the Portuguese Expeditionary Forces was no exception so by the end of 1945, most of the troops were back home.
In early 1946, a major restructuring of all Portuguese armed forces began to bring all services up-to-date with the new technologies and tactics recently acquired, but the PoAF was already equipped with recent aircraft, most of them acquired during the war years, as it had been more directly involved in combat than any other Portuguese armed forces branch.
Aircraft such as the NA P-51 Mustang, Republic P-47 Thunderbolt , Hawker Hurricane and the Supermarine Spitfire, these aircraft were mostly of the latest models, as most of the older versions were almost completely replaced by the end of the war.
One of the best fighters the war brought forward was the mighty Thunderbolt and with such a weapon in their hands, PoAF war veteran pilots brought back their combat experience to the academy and the PoAF was never the same.
The 5th Fighter Squadron was formed in July, 1946 when the Portuguese National Air Guard, the GNA(Guarda Nacional Aérea) was established at BA2 at Ota, and flew the Jugs till their retirement in 1956.
The pilots of the 5th FS would soon travel to the U.S. to start training for the transition to the F-86F that was already being negotiated with the USAF."







Well, that's my 4th finished model this year and that matches my total output of 4 in 2015! On top of that, it's also my 4th whif of the year...  :)
It's the excellent Revell 1/72 P-47D-30, which had been in my stalled builds pile since i decided to halt the build and wait to finish it later after i got my modeling skills a bit more advanced. There are a lot of blunders but i'm happy with it, it was a fun build, no problems with most of the kit, except for the canopy which didn't fit well in the closed position, so i had to sand the canopy's bottom framing to get it to conform to the fuselage when closed.
Other than that, only my mistakes and lack of a decent fingertip set on my hands...  ;D
It also came out of the pile to be another build for my alternative PoAF since WWII, in which Portugal joined the Allies in the effort against the Nazis, since May of 1940.
Tried some paint chipping for the first time on the anti-glare panel, which is the only painted area on the fuselage and was a good test. I can see in the pics that i overdid it a bit but i don't think it's very bad, it's just bad... maybe next time! ;D
Also, the smoke stained areas didn't come out very well as the humbrol pigment just didn't wanna stick to the surface of the model. Another material that i have to properly learn how to use.

Hope you like this simple whif, thanks for looking!  :)

Zen
« Last Edit: February 16, 2018, 02:09:17 AM by DFZ »
"Stick and stones may brake some bones but a 3,57's gonna blow your damn head off!"