Author Topic: Wings of Zen  (Read 8293 times)

Offline DFZ

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Wings of Zen
« on: December 14, 2015, 02:49:57 AM »
Whasssuuuup! 8)

This is were i'll post my finished models. I don't have much to show for my 2 years back into modeling, as i'm a slow builder, and not a very good one... But i don't care, i enjoy it anyway! ;D I also have to warn you that my photos aren't very good, all i have at the moment is my iphone so don't expect much. And maybe, those of you who go to Whatifmodelers.com, have probably seen one or 2 of them...
All of my stuff is 1/72 scale as i don't have room for all the models i wanna build in 1/72, let alone in 1/48... :(
My first "Whif" was started back in 2013, and it's now been entered in the "Clear your bench15/16" GB, the F-16W.
I'll be posting the progress on that on in the respective GB thread until it's finished.

The 1st finished whif would be a very slight one, just a different scheme, in fact, it's absence. It was supposed to be a 2 tone green camo but i really wanted a BMF Fishbed... Oh, i was forgetting the drop tanks location, those were only carried on the outboard pylons, i believe. I just didn't know better at the time and thought that was the right configuration for them. :P
I took new photos today as the old ones were even worse...

MIG-21 Fishbed - Model: ZTS Plastyk

March 1977, somewhere over Siberia... ;D




Next was to be an F-16, Block50 version, with some of the Block 60's features and a new MATV nozzle, derived from the one tested on the F-16VISTA/MATV. This was to be a specific air defense variant, going back to the LWF philosophy, Lockheed-Martin engineers decided to go back to the light weight landing gear, and using the drop tanks for quick weight and drag reduction in case of WVR combat, but with provisions to also use the CFTs, if needed. With an adapted GE F135 engine, AN/APG-83 SABR AESA radar and a few other electronic upgrades, this should be quite an able Viper to protect the Portugueses skies. Acquired by the PoAF through the Peace Atlantis III treaty.

F-16C Block50+ ADCUP (Air Defense Combat Upgrade Program) - Model: Italeri

Seen here just before disappearing in the clouds...  ;)



3rd what-if, the F-5PM TigerIII was a modernized F-5E TigerII, through a deal involving Embraer, Raytheon and the OGMAS, the Portuguese aeronautical technology industries. Up-to-date radar and weapons systems for the small jet, bought back in the 70's 2 years after the end of the Dictatorship regime.

F-5PM TigerIII - Model - Hobbyboss






The 4th whif would start my alternative history from the beginning of WW2, when the Treaty of Windsor was reactivated by Churchill.
But this model is from a later war period, the P-51D was operated by the Portuguese pilots since the middle of 1944.
The scheme is the one used after the war, back in Portugal, operating under the new Portuguese Air Force. I say new because in the real world PoAF was only established in 1952, in my timeline it was created just after the war, with Portugal joining Nato from it's onset in 1949.

P-51D Mustang in PoAF service - Model - Airfix





These 4 models were all hand-brushed with the hairy stick, i'm just now about to finish my first model painted with an airbrush, and i sure like the result...
If all goes well, i'll soon have another one or two to join this gallery.
Thanks for looking!  :)

Zen
« Last Edit: February 16, 2018, 01:43:17 AM by DFZ »
"Stick and stones may brake some bones but a 3,57's gonna blow your damn head off!"

Offline Brian da Basher

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2015, 04:53:54 AM »
Those are some mighty fine models, Zen!

I really like how that metal finish came out on your MiG 21. That baby certainly looks every bit the business!

I'm especially fond of your Portuguese aircraft, the F-5 in particular. The camo on that bird is excellent and really sets off those great Portuguese markings nicely!

Brian da Basher

Offline DFZ

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2015, 05:56:39 AM »
Those are some mighty fine models, Zen!

I really like how that metal finish came out on your MiG 21. That baby certainly looks every bit the business!

I'm especially fond of your Portuguese aircraft, the F-5 in particular. The camo on that bird is excellent and really sets off those great Portuguese markings nicely!

Brian da Basher

I thank you, very glad you like them! :icon_alabanza: :)
"Stick and stones may brake some bones but a 3,57's gonna blow your damn head off!"

Offline elmayerle

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2015, 08:34:45 AM »
Very nice work there and some attractive models as a result.  I like the rationales behind them, too.

having purchased the F-5E, would Portugal follow that with the F-20?

Offline DFZ

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2015, 09:41:33 AM »
Very nice work there and some attractive models as a result.  I like the rationales behind them, too.

having purchased the F-5E, would Portugal follow that with the F-20?


First of all, thank you!  :)
About the F-20, i believe so, it would've been a very probable choice, instead of the Corsairs. If the PoAF had already bought F-5s in the early 1970s, they wouldn't need to buy the A-7s in 80/81 to replace the very old F-86Fs. I guess they would've either bought more F-5s, or waited for the F-20 til 1985. I'm planning to build the Hasegawa kit i've got in the stash as a modernized F-20 in the same camo i used on the F-5, following that type of scenario.
A fellow Portuguese modeler called Jaime Vinha has built a pretty cool one in PoAF markings in 2014, check it out.
http://forum.modelismo-na.net/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=24095&hilit=Tigershark .

Zen
"Stick and stones may brake some bones but a 3,57's gonna blow your damn head off!"

Offline DFZ

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2016, 09:05:34 AM »
Ok, another finished whif... :icon_beer:

F-16W - 422nd Test and Evaluation squadron, Nellis AFB, 2010



The F-16W was the 1st of a few redesigns of the old Viper.
After the US government dropped the F-35 back in 2001, the US Air force would still be well provisioned with the F-22 Raptor, but that would leave the other services with a problem.
By cancelling the F-35, the DoD decides to ask manufacturers for new upgrade programs that could enhance survivability and performance in various aspects of the existing 4th Gen fighters like the F-15, -16 and -18. All the kits had to be able to be retrofitted to existing in-service aircraft.



Eventually, the F-15 would have the newest version called F-15SE, and the Hornet would become the Super Hornet. But the changes would be further developed as the world's financial situation was becoming more and more unstable, Nato partners would probably be out of money to invest in completely new aircraft in the near future, so the cheaper alternatives seemed like a much wiser choice.
The changes began with the engine, the  Pratt&Whitney F119 would be retrofitted to the F-16 airframe, which didn't pose a big problem as the 119's dimensions are very similar to the P&W F100 and GE F110. The 2D TVC nozzle is integrated into the engine, and also added weight to the engine choice as it would greatly improve maneuverability and lower the IR signature.



Taking the F-22's experience, and using some other design features that were supposed to be a part of the F-35, Lockheed decides to stick to the F-16 basic airframe and develop add-on kits that could address any short comings the original design had.
These kits would be developed throughout several years since mid 2002. The F-16W was the first aircraft to be built for testing of some of the major changes to the Viper, but an even bigger redesign would come around 2009, when the wings and tails were changed.
There were 2 versions of Packs to be developed, air-to-air and air-to-ground. The air to ground kit design would result in the AF-16A, of which the prototype was presented to the public in the 2012 Singapore air show.
The wings and stabs had become bigger, with a redesigned profile, using the F-22's wing profile, but adapting it to match the load capacity the old wing had, so instead of having only two wing pylon stations like the Raptor, it would have 3 hardpoints underneath the wing, and the traditional wingtip missile launcher as on the original Viper wing. The F-35's tail section design would be used when the decision was made to give the Viper twin tails.



The DSI intake, after the successful test series back in 1996, on an F-16C block30, would be adopted for these upgrade kits as it reduced weight and RCS.
The undercarriage section was also redesigned, as the length of the aircraft would be increased by the new horizontal tails. The option to try a Hornet type landing gear to give the fighter a higher ground clearance, but that meant an extensive study of how to fit a kit of the new bigger landing gears bays setup. Going with a CFT type of design, the bays would be moved down and aft, to give it an even bigger clearance of the tail on high AoA landings. This also brought out the old idea of having the F-16 on carriers, something that would become much easier to consider with the new gear.
Another old idea that re-emerged was the landing gear door-mounted missiles. The missiles would now be place on the sides of the enlarged landing gear bays, much like the F-15 or even the F-18's fuselage mounted missiles, giving the F-16 another 2 weapon stations.
Block 60 features as the IRST in front of the cockpit and Forward looking sensors on the sides of the cockpit.



Concerning radar cross section, the DSI, the twin tails, planform alignment of most angles, a new type of radar absorbing paint that was developed in 2009, along with the new RAM coating material applied on the whole aircraft and pylons, would help reduce the Viper's RCS to the size of a small car, with full external load. A big difference to the house-sized RCS of the original Vipers.
After all the changes were ground-tested and approved, the 1st prototype flew in 2010 at Nellis Air Force base, and kept being flown by the 422nd Test and Evaluation Squadron throughout the year.
Pics depict the F-16W in live weapons testing... 8)







Thanks for looking! :)
« Last Edit: February 16, 2018, 01:53:55 AM by DFZ »
"Stick and stones may brake some bones but a 3,57's gonna blow your damn head off!"

Offline The Big Gimper

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2016, 10:03:31 AM »
Tres Bien!!!!  :)
Work in progress ::

I am giving up listing them. They all end up on the shelf of procrastination anyways.

User and abuser of Bothans...

Offline taiidantomcat

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2016, 11:33:11 AM »
Great seeing all your projects here!! Fabulous body of work  :) (The viper is still just knocking my socks off!!)
"They know you can do anything, So the question is, what don't you do?"

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Offline kerick

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2016, 11:57:38 AM »
Love the Whisky Viper! I'm looking forward to the F-20!

Offline Tophe

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2016, 12:07:49 PM »
 :-* The F-16W is very lovely, thanks for having created it!

Offline elmayerle

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2016, 12:43:31 PM »
The F-16W is very nice, but not as "out there" as the most extreme version pitched to the UAE.  That was basically a F-16XL but with the F-22's wing (it does fit well) and had considerable range.

Offline DFZ

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #11 on: January 21, 2016, 11:40:48 AM »
 :icon_surprised: Guys, i can't thank you enough for your words, they mean a lot to me! I'm very happy that my modeling family likes my firstborn whif! It was the first one i started 2 and half years ago, so it was such a joy to get it finished like that, but even better to know you guys like it! :):icon_alabanza:  :icon_beer:

The F-16W is very nice, but not as "out there" as the most extreme version pitched to the UAE.  That was basically a F-16XL but with the F-22's wing (it does fit well) and had considerable range.

Yeah, i've seen that one here: http://www.f-16.net/f-16_versions_article10.html
A beauty indeed, i'd like to build one, just have to find a good deal for a Revell or Academy 1/72 Raptor. ;)

Again, i thank you all for your generous words!  :)

Zen
 :icon_meditation:
"Stick and stones may brake some bones but a 3,57's gonna blow your damn head off!"

Offline elmayerle

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #12 on: January 22, 2016, 07:03:03 AM »
Doing one in 1/144 and then considering using a YF-22 wing to do one in 1/72; it would be easier if there was an inexpensive and accurate 1/72 F-16XL available.  You need to start from that because it does have the same stretch and semi-conformal Sparrow/AMRAAM carriage as the F-16XL.  Want to do one using a diverter-less inlet and an l-o exhaust nozzle similar to that of the X-35.

Offline DFZ

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #13 on: January 22, 2016, 11:04:41 AM »
Well, there's a correct conversion set from Japan, LoneStar resin parts, check it out: http://www.h4.dion.ne.jp/~lonestar/SALES.htm
I've bought both the single and twin seat XLs and 2 sets of DSIs. ;)

Zen
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"Stick and stones may brake some bones but a 3,57's gonna blow your damn head off!"

Offline DFZ

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Re: Wings of Zen
« Reply #14 on: March 15, 2016, 10:13:56 PM »
Ok, another whif left the bench...

"In 1952, with the creation of the new Portuguese Air Force, fighter jets were the first acquisitions since Salazar acknowledged its potential and possible effect that would have on the control capacity of the colonized territories. After the introduction of the F-86 jet and the Mig-15, pilots around the world knew these were the state-of-the-art aircraft of their day and obviously, interest rapidly started to grow among PoAF generals.
Since the agreement that would bring the F-86 to Portugal was still to come in 1957, the PoAF's Generals were told to first looked among its NATO allies in Europe. After being turned down by the European NATO countries due to his colonial policy, Salazar finally listened to his Air Force generals and gave them the green light to procure outside of NATO.
After tough negotiations, also due to Portugal being a colonial country, a deal was finally made with Saab and the Swedish Government, which resulted in 5 J 29B fighters delivered in 1953 and 15 in 1955, which would already be the F version, with a "dog tooth" on the leading edge of the wings and the afterburning engine DeHavilland Ghost.
In 1961, the Portuguese Colonial War begins in Angola and Salazar decided to display force to what he thought was only a minor terrorism wave, so 8 Sabres were dispatched to Guinea in August, 1961. The Tunnan was to remain in Portugal and not see service in the war because of the ever-growing pressure exerted by the United Nations.
In 1963, the first 5 model B fighters were extensively modernized up to the F standard and all the fighters were given the ability to fire Aim-9B Sidewinder missiles. The missiles were already available on the PoAF's arsenal because the F-86F Sabre already used them since 1962. The Tunnan was loved by both ground crews and pilots, and although both words mean the same, some affectionately called it "Pipa" but most preferred the more masculine name of "Barril", which obviously means barrel.
Both fighters were used together since the F-86 arrived in Portugal in 1958, up to the phase-out of the last 10 Tunnan in 1974. "








Hope you like it, thanks for looking! :)

Zen
 :icon_meditation:
« Last Edit: February 16, 2018, 01:58:17 AM by DFZ »
"Stick and stones may brake some bones but a 3,57's gonna blow your damn head off!"