Author Topic: Kits on Shapeways  (Read 32108 times)

Offline kitnut617

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #75 on: May 30, 2017, 08:44:58 AM »
Similar rocket weapon from the UK might also be considered.  Do not recall the project name for it but it was quite similar to the Tiny Tim.

It was called an 'Uncle Tom' Jeff. Same diameter shell head, and powered by six 3" Triplex rocket motors.  In one of my 'Spitfire' books, there's a photo of the Spiteful loaded with four of them. I've also got another photo in a book of a De Havilland Mosquito loaded with a couple under the fuselage (but do you think I can find it right now [found the Spiteful pic though])
« Last Edit: May 30, 2017, 08:47:56 AM by kitnut617 »

Online The Big Gimper

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #76 on: May 30, 2017, 09:35:00 AM »
would there be any interest in non US/UK nuclear gravity bombs?


12,000 pound Tall Boy and if possible the 6000 pound version (believe this was just a proposal) would be excellent in 1:48th and 1:72nd scale.  Some one at Shapeways offers the Tall Boy and Grand Slam in 1:144th scale but they appear to have no interest in scaling their model up. 



I'd like to 2nd Jeff's request for the Tall Boy / T-10. And add in 1/72 the VB-3 Razon and the ASM-A-1 / VB-14 Tarzon. Not sure if you could also build the fins.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASM-A-1_Tarzon

The VB-3 Razon (for range and azimuth) was a standard 1,000-pound general purpose bomb fitted with flight control surfaces. Development of the Razon began in 1942, but it did not see use during World War II.



19th Bomb Group B-29s dropped 489 Razons during the Korean War, the first in August 1950. Razons were not ideal weapons. For instance, the warhead was usually not big enough to drop a bridge (it took on average four Razon hits). Also, about one-third of those dropped did not respond to radio control. Despite these difficulties, B-29 bombardiers destroyed 15 bridges with Razon bombs.

http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/Visit/Museum-Exhibits/Fact-Sheets/Display/Article/196093/vb-3-razon-bomb/

https://weaponsandwarfare.com/2015/11/03/guided-bombs-in-korea/
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Offline Ranchoth

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #77 on: May 30, 2017, 12:42:45 PM »

What are we looking at here?
[/quote]

Soviet/Russian tactical nukes, for starters—enough data has seeped out through the years from official sources, secondhand accounts, and photos from Russian museums that I'm confident enough to model a few of them, some of which may never have gotten a model release. There are a couple of nuclear depth bombs (one that looks to be the rough counterpart to the US Lulu and Betty, and another that seems to be closer to a NDB-specialized B57) that are pretty novel looking.

There are about four Chinese bombs of which photos (from museums, historical documents, test footage, etc) exist, two of which were intended to be carried by the Q-5 (again, visible in pictures, or from translated articles). Q-5s also being supplied to Pakistan and North Korea (and some of the PAF's apparently rumored to be outfitted for nuclear missions), it seems reasonable to guess that, form following function, and with a small enough warhead, the weapon shapes might be very similar or identical.

(It's trickier to estimate the minimum size of the nuclear primary for those two countries, of course, although some guesstimates can be made from missile warheads. And Kim Jong-Un actually posed with a supposed 1:1 mockup of one, not long back, which I could check against a conceptual bomb size. Actually, I was thinking of offering that bare warhead itself, for modelmaking or action figure customization purposes!)

Pictures of some South African bomb casings have been out for awhile, and I understand there's a recent book that's come out, with input from members of the bomb program, with even more details on the program, including information on other weapons that were built but not fielded, or designed but not built. Interesting stuff, if a bit esoteric.

If you really want to get esoteric, though, there's actually enough information to make a couple of Indian nuclear weapons...as well as a Swedish one, from that country's abortive weapons program!

For a more mainstream angle, it's also certainly very practical to make the French nuclear gravity bombs, or the ASMP nuclear missile. Some of these, I believe, are already available as commercial models, but not all of them, and not in every scale. Weapons of the Force de frappe would probably serve, in a pinch, for nuclear shapes for "what if" builds for Mirage-flying countries that pursued, but never completed, a nuclear weapons program, such as (IRL!) Switzerland, Brazil, or Argentina.

Oh, and those conventional heavy hitters suggested above are certainly in the running. (Anyone want a T-12? :D )

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #78 on: May 30, 2017, 04:45:26 PM »
I would be interested in a Swedih bomb at least.
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Offline Ranchoth

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #79 on: June 04, 2017, 10:37:31 AM »

Getting a little bit of work done (and a lot of eyestrain in) before the weekend's over...the Tallboy is now available, in 1/48 and 1/72, as well as the Tarzon in 1/48.

Grand Slam will probably follow sooner than later. And that reminds me...any demand for a FAB-5000 or FAB-9000?

Offline jcf

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #80 on: June 05, 2017, 09:51:53 AM »
Tarzon under a Tiger Force Lancaster.
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Sense doesn’t come into it. People are
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Offline tsrjoe

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #81 on: June 05, 2017, 05:08:13 PM »
it would be nice to have a model of the South African freefall bomb for use on the Buccaneer, likewise if any casing designs have surfaced for Argentinian (Lincon?) and Indian (Canberra?) designs.
I recall reading both Australia and Canada proposed bomb programmes of their own but im not sure if those reached casing design stage.
The Swedish bomb casing is a nice little piece intended for carriage on the A.36 and Lansen

the US. Razon and Tarzon bombs would make for useful models, somat different too and types I don't previously recall in 72 scale :)

Offline Rickshaw

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #82 on: June 05, 2017, 08:55:15 PM »
Australia's nuclear programme was a non-starter.   Only the Australian National University and the Snowy Mountains electrics scheme were ever built.  The ANU was to provide the theoretical basis, providing physicists and engineers to built the bombs, developed by the British.  The Snowy Mountains scheme was to provide the vast amounts of electricity required to enrich Uranium for the bombs.   In neither case was the ultimate objective fulfilled.   The British, advised by the Americans that if they ever wanted to share nuclear knowledge with them, were told to drop the Australian joint project to build a bomb.  In American eyes, the Australian Government leaked like a sieve to the fUSSR (The Petrov affair appeared to confirm this). The UK did so.   Australia was left as a testing ground for UK Nukes and had an expensive university (which wasn't without it's uses) and an expensive hydro-electric scheme (which had alternative uses). No designs were designed, let alone reached the hardware stage.   Canberra was ultimately dependent on the British anyway.

Offline Ranchoth

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #83 on: June 08, 2017, 03:12:22 PM »
it would be nice to have a model of the South African freefall bomb for use on the Buccaneer, likewise if any casing designs have surfaced for Argentinian (Lincon?) and Indian (Canberra?) designs.


I was musing over this, and the Australian program, and it occurred to me to check the described size of the first tested Indian nuclear device from 1974 (a "hexagonal" shape 1.25 meters in diameter) against a Canberra's bomb bay size...and, from what I'm seeing, you could juuust squeeze it inside—very possibly deliberately, as part of the bomb's design process, if they wanted something that could be (relatively) quickly adapted into an "emergency capability" weapon that didn't have to be dropped out the back of a cargo plane.

Anyway, assuming form would follow function, but wanting to test this out a little more, I whipped up a crude weapon shape along the lines of the US Mk.5 or Mk.6 nuclear weapon...in X-Plane, my favored flight sim, large enough to contain the nuclear primary, and weighted roughly appropriately, loaded it onto a Canberra, and made a few crude LABS toss-bombs in a range north of Fallon, NV.

And—huzzah!—according to the test runs, and consulting with NUKEMAP, even with a barely streamlined bomb casing, I was able to get well over eight miles of separation between the aircraft and the bomb by the time of (weapon) impact, which would seem to be more than enough of a safe distance from an 8 kt detonation.

Thus, I would venture to say that such a weapon, tidied up and printed, could plausibly serve as a "What If?" stand-in shape for a very early product of a nuclear weapons program along the levels of India in 1974, and with an air force equipped with Canberras or B-57s. (So, for varying levels of plausibility...India, Pakistan, South Africa*, Argentina, Australia...Taiwan, Rhodesia, South Vietnam, Ethiopia, even, for the really out-there builds? :) )

So...any interest? :D



Oh, BTW...1/72 Tarzons are now available at the Shapeways shop.

*Much more accurate "real world" data is available for SA bomb shapes, however. Time to dust off my notes...

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #84 on: June 11, 2017, 03:32:38 AM »
Thanks Nick for designing/producing these bombs. Sending you a PM on these.

Question: Would you be interested in producing a conversion kit for the F-111B? Or at least the nose, FLIR pod.

There was one long ago from Pete's Hangar but is OOP.

http://www.aircraftresourcecenter.com/Rev3/2701-2800/rev2728-F-111-Thomason/00.shtm
http://tailspintopics.blogspot.ca/2009/10/grumman-f-111b.html



Thanks, Carl

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Offline Ranchoth

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #85 on: June 12, 2017, 02:59:19 PM »
Carl—I'll most certainly take a look at the F-111B nose. The biggest worry I'd have is being able to make a new part's "attach point" fit properly, without a base model to work from, but with enough data this probably isn't insurmountable.



Back to the matter of South Africa’s nuke/s, it’s been a few years since I last tackled the matter (for X-Plane), and since then comparatively quite a bit more fascinating technical information has come out.

To that end, I’ve produced:

*”Melba”—a “zeroth” generation nuclear weapon!



An interesting story behind this one; for many years, a South African-sourced photo has been circulating of several partial bomb casings stored at Pretoria’s nuclear weapon production facility.

However, later sources claim that these “bomb casings” weren’t from any of SA’s production nuclear weapons, which were smaller and fewer in number. However, my own size estimates of the pictured casings do match up quite closely with the diameter of the first test device designed and built around 1977, at least formally under the auspices of a PNE scheme. And somewhat resembles the simple illustration of the test device I’ve found, created by one of the members of the nuclear program.

The test would later be cancelled (in no small part to diplomatic pressure from the US/USSR after the preparations were discovered), and a test device later redesigned (and given the code name “Melba”) in a smaller form (and a lower yield), even more svelte than the inner gun-assembly of the initial device, which would also never be tested.

If I had to hazard a guess, then, if the photos of the “bomb casings” are from the nuclear program, and those size estimates are correct, they might have been spare/leftover/practice casings from the earlier days of the program, or from aborted schemes for later devices, now repurposed into protective the floor of a storeroom from dust.

In either case, though, both the initial, unnamed device and the miniaturized “Melba” were only intended as test devices, and “not deliverable,” according to Armscor, which assumed control of production when Pretoria moved formally to a military nuclear program. But, if we’re going “what if,” and pondering what a rushed (or jury-rigged) early South African nuke might have looked like…

The 3D modeled version (given the admittedly anachronistic name of the second device) meets the dimensions of the 1977 device, the forward section geometry based on the casing photos. The tail section is adapted from that of a Mirage III drop tank (in the SAAF inventory).

At 4.6 meters long, and weighing in the neighborhood of 3500 kg, it is a meter longer but a about 1000kg lighter than “Little Boy.” And with a projected yield of approximately six kilotons.

This is, by the figures I can find, small enough to fit in the internal weapons bay of a Canberra. Or the cargo bay of a C-130—I suppose you could load MORE than one on the latter, if you’re feeling particularly cocky.

After that, I have:

-“Hobo/Cabot” Nuclear Bomb!



After Armscor took the reigns of the weapons program, they built an initial “pre-qualification” dumb bomb in 1981/2, codenamed “Hobo” (later “Cabot”). A truly “deliverable” weapon, less specific details are available, but through deduction, it would seem to have been comparable in size/weight (though with a higher yield) to the miniaturized Melba device, and Armscor’s later “Hamerkop” weapon. (More on that, next)

Thus, we have “Cabot.” About two meters long and 6-750 kg in weight, yield again six kilotons. Front geometry based again on the photographed casings—for artistic reasons, for the rationale that the size estimates might have been off, and on the rationale that an oblate bomb shape would tend to be similar in any case—tail assembly roughly modeled after that of the Red Beard, with (retracted, in the print) pop-out fins (Armscor seemed to like to show off). This weapon should, by my notes, be suitable for carriage by the Buccaneer.

If I’m reading the data correctly, about six of these weapons were built, but only two were outfitted with nuclear material, with the others used for testing and as spares.

Now, we come to the really interesting bit…the “production” weapon, the Armscor Hamerkop (“Hammerhead”).

According to a few new sources, Armscor’s plans were not to merely produce a dumb bomb, but a TV guided glide bomb—quite ambitious. The only other TV guided nuclear weapon I can recall offhand was a variant of the AGM-62. These would have taken the form of warheads for the Armscor (later Denel) Raptor glide bomb, which has seen service in a conventional form since the 1980s, in several variants, and later exported/license produced/copied (accounts seem to differ) by Pakistan, where it serves today, reportedly on several other aircraft types (Mirages, JF-17s, etc.). I’m having trouble finding if there are any other users besides SA and Pakistan.

Seven nuclear Hamerkops were reportedly produced in the 1980s, with a yield of 20 kilotons each, and a glide range of about sixty kilometers. These weapons were also intended to be carried by the Buccaneer.

However, at this point, I confess that I’ve had much more trouble finding technical details on the Raptor—I only found a decent enough diagram of the thing while I was typing this up!—but, more to the point, someone’s already beaten me to the punch on Shapeways. Model Ordnance offers a 1/72 version, including the Data Link and ECM pods. As far as I can tell, the nuclear warhead for the Hamerkop would have been the same or similar sized to the Raptor’s conventional one, so this would be the expedient choice for 1/72 modelers wishing to acquire one.

There were a few other South African nuclear warhead concepts, such as smaller implosion devices—all of the above devices were Uranium gun devices. It looks like they would have been Uranium, not Plutonium, implosion devices at that. The United States, Soviet Union, China, and Pakistan have all tested such devices, with the latter two apparently fielding them—boosted weapons, and even thermonuclear devices. But very little actual work was done towards developing them, let alone any hardware design.

So, there ya have it! Two or three shiny new/old nukes, for equipping South African or other comparably equipped historical “what if?” air forces.

Offline Ranchoth

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #86 on: June 22, 2017, 03:06:49 PM »

While chasing down some bugs with the AGM-129 models, I scraped up some time for a new offering...



In other words, the conceptual Swedish nuclear weapon design, circa 1955!



Building this one was an interesting challenge, requiring the consulting of sometimes obscure, scattered technical sources online, and borrowing Wilhelm Agrell's fascinating 2002 book Svenska förintelsevapen from the Library of Congress. Which was a bit challenging in itself, as the book is in Swedish.

But, this gave me firm enough footing to build this first weapon, a two-point plutonium implosion bomb design outlined by the Swedish National Defense Research Institute in 1955. A 400-500 kg weapon with a 20 Kt yield, intended to be carried by the A-32 Lansen or the (also never built) SAAB A-36 supersonic nuclear bomber. Complete with accurate casing size and shape, thanks to surviving diagrams.

This also gives some clues to a projected next generation of Swedish bombs, as envisioned in the early 60s, and as mentioned in a later defense study, if with sparser details (mainly concerning planned weapon yield, which would have doubled).

Although the original reports' texts don't seem to be available in either a) my continent, or b) in English, Agrell's book seems to infer that the a version of the Rb05 would have been intended for a nuclear role, which, when combined with other details about the preexisting bomb designs, and another contemporary Swedish special weapon, the SAAB "Robot 330" surface-to-surface cruise missile, gives a rough idea of the size of the planned nuclear warhead, a bit slimmer than the '55 design. Although the A-36 specifications of the late 50s seemed to call for a (single?) heavier weapon, I'm not seeing any references to a larger-yield fission bombs or thermonuclear weapons planned anywhere—perhaps the A-36 was actually intended to carry two, carry a missile, or was simply intended to have some margin for future-proofing. Or to get really exotic, maybe it could have been a combined bomb-fuel tank, a la with the B-58.

In any case, the "FOA m/1955" is now up for grabs in 1/48 or 1/72.

:D

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #87 on: June 22, 2017, 08:28:07 PM »
I always suspected that the chicken was a nuclear weapons scientist.

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Offline tsrjoe

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #88 on: June 22, 2017, 11:24:56 PM »
I have a drawing showing the Swedish casing for their A.36 nuke, il pm you with details

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #89 on: June 23, 2017, 12:34:26 AM »
I'd like that as I have the Broplan A36 in 1/72.


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Offline elmayerle

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #90 on: June 23, 2017, 01:33:19 AM »
I'd like that as I have the Broplan A36 in 1/72.


Seconded!  I also have one of those kits.  Actually, I'd be interested in the missile version, too, for an "alternate A-36" configuration I'm playing with.

Offline Ranchoth

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #91 on: June 23, 2017, 08:59:54 PM »
Seconded!  I also have one of those kits.  Actually, I'd be interested in the missile version, too, for an "alternate A-36" configuration I'm playing with.


Glad to hear it, and that's given me some ideas for a new pack—a nuclear Rb05 would be no trouble, although the other planned nuclear missile, the Rb330, doesn't seem to be well suited for aircraft carriage. (Too long, even deleting the first stage booster, and the planned guidance system doesn't sound like it'd fare well launched from a moving platform.)

A pity, as the missile has some truly gorgeous lines...





Although I could certainly produce an accurate GLCM version with little trouble. Or, heck, a truly "fantasy" air-launched mod. (Figuring out the performance figures might be a bit tricky, but how can anyone say no to twin ramjets? ;) )

Offline elmayerle

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #92 on: June 24, 2017, 12:54:23 AM »
You'd probably still need a booster for the air-launched version, need to get it up to where the ramjets will function properly.

A distinct nuclear Rb05 sounds useful.

Offline Jeffry Fontaine

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #93 on: June 24, 2017, 02:15:25 AM »

The instructions guy at Ikea used to be employed with the Swedish Nuclear Weapons Development Agency?  :)

Subtle and funny! 
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Offline Ranchoth

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #94 on: June 24, 2017, 05:41:06 AM »
You'd probably still need a booster for the air-launched version, need to get it up to where the ramjets will function properly.

Indeed—although hopefully the launch plane's speed would at least shave some of the size off. Something testable with a few calculators or sims, luckily enough!

For an even lower-tech alternative, a Swedish BOAR would probably also be perfectly reasonable, and fit inside the bomb bay..or should that be "BØAR"?

Offline ChernayaAkula

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #95 on: June 25, 2017, 02:12:32 AM »

The instructions guy at Ikea used to be employed with the Swedish Nuclear Weapons Development Agency?  :)


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Offline Jeffry Fontaine

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #96 on: June 25, 2017, 07:41:51 AM »
I have been corresponding with another maker at Shapeways about a weapons set that is peculiar to the South African Air Force.  The maker is Pieter Kasselman and his Shapeways Shop is called Model Ordnance.

Pieter has a number of weapons in his shop, mostly 1:72nd scale but hopefully in time these too will be scaled up to 1:48th scale.  For now, his Hammerhead weapons set can be found at these links:

1/72 Buccaneer H-2 Raptor Weaopon Pack

1/48 Buccaneer H-2 Raptor Weaopon Pack - Sprue

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Offline Ranchoth

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #97 on: June 26, 2017, 08:46:37 PM »

Well, a little work over the weekend, and I've got...

The 800kg, 4-meter nuke from the A.36 design requirements (special thanks to tsrjoe) in 1/72:



A "slim fin" version (with tail design taken from another contemporary Swedish iron bomb) of the smaller "FOA m/1955" from before, possibly better suited for internal carriage. In single and in economical two-packs!



And, finally, the SAAB RB 05, with two different nose options—the pointed one from the MCLOS Rb05a, and a TV Guidance version of the proposed (but never built) Rb 05b. As mentioned before, these might do a dandy job as nuclear platforms for a "what if?" build.


Offline Jeffry Fontaine

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #98 on: June 28, 2017, 03:15:15 AM »
For anyone that is interested in accessories to tart up your Meng Models F-350, Toyota Hi-Lux, or Toyota Land Cruiser.  This item could also be used for other 1:35th and 1:32nd scale models.  This normally works with HO scale accessories has been contacted to see if something could be done about scaling up his truck box accessory set to 1:35th scale.  The name of the Maker's Shop is CustomModelCreations

The model is now available at this link: Pickup Truck Tool Box Set 2 Pack W Winch 1-32 Scale (click on html or image to view product at Shapeways). 


Yes, I know it is 1:32nd scale and not 1:35th but it is close enough to the right size that a little file work or sandpaper should resolve any fit issues.  Plus it is progress. 

The image shows the model parts upside down.  There are two truck bed-width boxes, two winches, and two bed length boxes that fit along the top edge of the truck bed over the fenders.  The maker has also scaled up a series of Rigid Job Site Equipment Boxes that can be found by visiting the makers shop link. 
« Last Edit: June 28, 2017, 03:32:45 AM by Jeffry Fontaine »
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Offline Ranchoth

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Re: Kits on Shapeways
« Reply #99 on: July 14, 2017, 08:08:23 PM »

It's been awhile since I've checked in, 'been busy...in no small part to debugging problems with the 1/72 AGM-129s, mostly due to Shapeways deciding to be finicky.

But with that bit and some clumps of my hair aside, I have managed to produce a few more offerings...and based on some requests from here!

Such as:

The AGM-124 "Wasp" Pods, six-tube, in 1/48 and 1/72
.



The VB-3 "Razon" guided bomb, in economical four-pack, again in 1/48 and 1/72.



After that...anyone want a Nazi atomic bomb? 'Cause I've got two of 'em!

The first, the supposed "Virus House" Bomb:



This conceptual design was floating around online awhile back, spawned from a postulating luft46.com article, going on information from a book on the Horten brothers, itself evidently taking information from a 1947 book by an ALSOS physicist, which referred to a diagrammed German nuclear device as a "bomb." Sarcastically.

The device in question, in fact, was a small, very crude research reactor built by Werner Heisenberg at the University of Leipzig in 1942. But which, in fact, actually blew up after a couple of weeks—a leak in the pressure vessel caused a Uranium fire and a steam/hydrogen explosion which caused the thing to burst apart, showing the lab with burning metal. So, technically, this is the only guaranteed authentic model of a German nuclear explosive device available. :D

Next, the "Diebner" atomic bomb:



Allegedly designed by Kurt Diebner, according to slightly suspicious technical reports and diagrams unearthed in recent years, and even more outlandishly said to have been tested in 1944.

A modestly Wagnerian bomb in size, it was actually "calculated" to have a very low yield. But still, an effective way to get more bang for your greif.

Start your christmas shopping today, and buy a pair to bookend your Haunebu!  ;D