Author Topic: Recent Builds  (Read 4310 times)

Offline elmayerle

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Re: Recent Builds
« Reply #30 on: December 19, 2019, 01:10:26 PM »
Brilliant; I love the looks of the completed (almost!) museum.

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Re: Recent Builds
« Reply #31 on: December 20, 2019, 01:55:57 AM »
Nice display
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Offline ScranJ51

  • Fast Jet, Fast Prop, Fast Racing Cars - thats me!!
Re: Recent Builds
« Reply #32 on: January 05, 2020, 05:50:46 PM »
A few more for the Annex (all 1/24th)

Sauber C22

Sauber-1 by David Freeman, on Flickr

Sauber-2 by David Freeman, on Flickr

Sauber-3 by David Freeman, on Flickr


SAUBER C22
The Sauber C22 was the Formula One car that Sauber Petronas used to compete in the 2003 Formula One season and was the third car that Willy Rampf designed for Sauber. Nick Heidfeld and Heinz-Harald Frentzen drove this car with Neel Jani as the test driver. The engine was the Petronas 03A V10. The car's major sponsor was Credit Suisse.

The car's most successful race came in the shape of the United States Grand Prix at Indianapolis where they scored 10 points with Heidfeld finishing in 5th place and Frentzen achieving a podium finish of 3rd. The team finished sixth in the 2003 Constructors' Championship, scoring nineteen points from the sixteen races. This was one place down on the 5th position which the team achieved, when they used the Sauber C21s in the 2002 season.


Toyota TF-102

TF102-1 by David Freeman, on Flickr

Tf102-2 by David Freeman, on Flickr

Tf102-3 by David Freeman, on Flickr

TOYOTA TF102
The Toyota TF102 was the car with which the Toyota team competed in the 2002 Formula One season, the team's inaugural Championship campaign. The car reflected the results of a year's testing in 2001 with theTF101, and was designed primarily by Gustav Brunner and Dago Rohrer. As with the TF101, it was piloted during the season by Mika Salo and Allan McNish. The car had a much more conventional look in the aerodynamic sense than the test car did, something that was commented on by Brunner at its launch in November 2001: "The car tested during 2001 showed the results we wanted. This new model reflects the latest technology, and has a much more conventional setup than the test car."  The car sported a different paint livery than the one seen on the test car, with a more abstract red and white design taking over from the contoured lines of the previous model.

At the opening race of the 2002 season in Melbourne, Salo came home sixth to give the team a point on its Formula One début. The Finn added a second point two races later, in Brazil.  McNish, meanwhile, was on course for a point of his own in Malaysia, but a pit-lane mistake by the team meant he finished seventh. During qualifying for the final race of the season, at Suzuka, he wrote off a chassis completely when he crashed at the super-quick 130R corner, also tearing a hole in the Armco barrier. However, he sustained no serious injury, which paid testament to the safety of the TF102.

The two points put Toyota tenth in the Constructors' Championship, behind Minardi on count-back (Mark Webber had finished fifth in Australia) but ahead of the financially troubled Arrows.

Team principal Ove Andersson had warned at the beginning of the season that it would be very much a "learning year" and overall the car's performance was received with optimism due to its sturdy reliability.


Lotus 49B

49b-2 by David Freeman, on Flickr

49b-3 by David Freeman, on Flickr

49b-4 by David Freeman, on Flickr

LOTUS 49B
The Lotus 49 was a Formula One racing car designed by Colin Chapman and Maurice Philippe for the 1967 F1 season. It was designed around the Cosworth DFV engine that would power most of the Formula One grid through the 1970s and was the first successful Formula One car to feature the engine as a stressed member.
The 49 was an advanced design in Formula 1 because of its chassis configuration. The specially-designed engine became a stress-bearing structural member (seen earlier with the H16 engine in the Lotus 43 and BRM P83, but prior to that in the front-engined Lancia D50 of 1954), bolted to the monocoque at one end and the suspension and gearbox at the other. Since then virtually all Formula 1 cars have been built this way.
The 49 was a testbed for several new pieces of race car technology and presentation. Lotus was the first team to use aerofoil wings, which appeared partway through 1968. Originally these wings were bolted directly to the suspension and were supported by slender struts. The wings were mounted several feet above the chassis of the car for effective use in clean air, however after several breakages which led to near fatal accidents, the high wings were banned and Lotus was forced to mount the wings directly to the bodywork.
Fast Jet, Fast Prop, Fast Racing Cars - thats me!!

Offline ScranJ51

  • Fast Jet, Fast Prop, Fast Racing Cars - thats me!!
Re: Recent Builds
« Reply #33 on: January 05, 2020, 05:54:59 PM »
And another

Ferrari P330-P4

330-2-1 by David Freeman, on Flickr

330-2-2 by David Freeman, on Flickr

330-2-3 by David Freeman, on Flickr


SCUDERIA FERRARI SEFAC 330 P4
1967 was a banner year for the Enzo Ferrari motor company, as it saw the production the mid-engined 330 P4, a renowned V12 endurance car meant to replace the previous year's P3.  Only four Ferrari P4 engined cars were ever made: one P 3/4 and three 330 P4's. Their 3-valve cylinder head was modelled after those of Italian Grand Prix-winning Formula One cars. To this was added the same fuel injection system from the P3 for an output of up to 450 hp (335 kW). In comparison with its rivals, the 330 P4 had poor aerodynamics, but its sexy looks continue to grab attention.

The P 3/4, one of the P4's, and one 412P electrified the racing world when they crossed the finish line together (in first 0846, second 0856, and third place 0844) in the 1967 24 Hours of Daytona, for a photo finish to counter Ford's photo of the Ford GT 40 MK II's crossing the finish line together First, Second, and Third at Le Mans in 1966.  Chassis 0856 was also driven to second in the 1967 Le Mans 24 hour race, piloted by factory drivers Ludovicio Scarfiotti and Mike Parkes.

Since then, the fate of these four nearly legendary cars has been the subject of much attention. All of the P4's built are accounted for, although P 3/4 0846 is surrounded in controversy.


This is the second 330P4 secured by the Museum

 ;)
Fast Jet, Fast Prop, Fast Racing Cars - thats me!!

Offline ScranJ51

  • Fast Jet, Fast Prop, Fast Racing Cars - thats me!!
Re: Recent Builds
« Reply #34 on: January 14, 2020, 07:06:54 AM »
Two more for the Annex:

Porsche 917K

917k-1 by David Freeman, on Flickr

917k-2 by David Freeman, on Flickr

917k-3 by David Freeman, on Flickr

Capri Sports Sedan

capri 2-1 by David Freeman, on Flickr

capri 2-2 by David Freeman, on Flickr

capri 2-3 by David Freeman, on Flickr

Had a spare resin body shell.  Flared the guards and built a floor on which to attach the axles and bigger tyres.  Fun paint scheme - not representative on any particular car.


And a "new" project - converting a B737-800 to an Aussie Wedgetail....

raaf e7a-2 by David Freeman, on Flickr

 8)

Fast Jet, Fast Prop, Fast Racing Cars - thats me!!

Offline ScranJ51

  • Fast Jet, Fast Prop, Fast Racing Cars - thats me!!
Re: Recent Builds
« Reply #35 on: January 20, 2020, 07:37:43 AM »
Couple more for the Annex - both 1/24th:

Toyota TS020 GT-1

TS020-1 by David Freeman, on Flickr

Ts020-2 by David Freeman, on Flickr

Ts020-3 by David Freeman, on Flickr

Ts020-4 by David Freeman, on Flickr

The 1999 Le Mans race boasted 6 major contenders.  The Toyota GT-One TS020 led the gruelling 24-hour event right up until an hour before the finish, when it was struck with an untimely tire blowout, but still managed to finish second.  Determined to repeat the impressive performance of the previous year (minus the trouble), the Toyota team concentrated on fine tuning their machine.  Subtle refinements to the sleek carbon fibre composite body were conducted in the pursuit of optimal aerodynamics, while the 3600cc V8 twin turbo R36V engine also underwent various modifications, improving power, torque and fuel efficiency.

Alfa 155 V6 TI

alfa 155-1 by David Freeman, on Flickr

alfa 155-2 by David Freeman, on Flickr

alfa 155-3 by David Freeman, on Flickr

The Alfa Romeo 155 V6 TI was a FIA Class 1 touring car that Alfa Corse raced from 1993 to 1996 in the Deutsche Tourenwagen Meisterschaft and the subsequent International Touring Car Championship.

A high-revving 2.5 L 60° V6 engine was coupled to a four wheel drive system, producing 490 PS (360 kW; 480 hp) at 11500 rpm.  Alfa Corse entered two 155 V6 TIs for works drivers Alessandro Nannini and Nicola Larini; the 1993 season was dominated by Larini winning 11 of 22 races.
 
In 1994 the rivals from Mercedes seemed to have the advantage but Alfa did manage to win a further 11 races. A more consistent performance from the Germans gave them the title.  Since the 1995 season the team got new sponsorship livery from Martini Racing.  The 1996 version had a 2.5 L 90° V6 engine based loosely on the PRV engine delivering 490 PS (360 kW; 480 hp) at 11,900 rpm, had a top speed of around 300 kilometres per hour (190 mph) and weighed 1,060 kilograms (2,340 lb).
 
The Alfa 155 V6 TI did a record of 38 wins (plus 3 other non-championship races). The victories were obtained by seven different drivers: 17 (+1) Nicola Larini, 13 (+1) Alessandro Nannini, 2 Stefano Modena, 2 (+1) Christian Danner, 2 Michael Bartels, 1 Kris Nissen and 1 Gabriele Tarquini.
Fast Jet, Fast Prop, Fast Racing Cars - thats me!!