Author Topic: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby  (Read 12614 times)

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #15 on: May 24, 2014, 05:06:39 AM »
[Slight thread deviation]


"Looking good. :) A different approach to the one I have for getting the Fw190 into RAAF service... ;) "  Do tell!  :D



My story is a bit more than just the Fw-190 (as you will see below) - the info below is just the bare bones and needs to be better developed and filled out.  It was all originally inspired by this image by Clave:



Basically, it starts with the 1936 RAAF  technical mission to Europe (which included the UK, France, the Netherlands, Germany and Italy) and the USA to evaluate modern aircraft types and select a type suitable to Australia's defence needs and within Australia's capabilities to build. In the real world, the three-man mission (which included CAC's Sir Lawrence Wackett) lasted five months and on its return advised that the North American NA-16 was the most suitable type…which eventually led to the Boomerang, CA-15 etc…

In my spin off, the team visit Focke-Wulf Flugzeugbau AG where Lawrence Wackett befriends Kurt Tank (both being decorated WWI veterans and highly capable aircraft designers).  Impressed with the innovation of Kurt Tank's designs (especially the emphasis on maintainability and ruggedness), Lawrence Wackett (and the team) recommend that the RAAF pursue a licence to produce the Focke-Wulf Fw 56 Stösser advanced trainer with possible extension to also build the Focke-Wulf Fw 159 fighter which shared components.  This further develops into a full partnership between Focke-Wulf and CAC with Kurt Tank taking up a proposal to emigrate to Australia to work with his friend Lawrence Wackett.

Always a keen business man, Lawrence Wackett is especially intrigued to rapidly build Australia's (and CAC's) aerospace capability, not only for military platforms but more so for civilian.  Of course, WII eventually leads to a focus on combat aircraft.  This eventually centres upon the following designs:

CA-1 Wirraway advanced trainer (aka FW-56)
CA-2 Currawong medium sized trainer/transport/liason/medium sized airliner aircraft (aka FW-158)
CA-3 Bilyara long range airliner/WII maritime patrol aircraft (aka FW-200)
CA-12 Boomerang (aka FW-190A series)
CA-14 Improved Boomerang  (aka TA-152)

Anyway, enough of that - it still needs a lot of work.  Back to your normal programming now.

[Slight thread deviation ended]
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

Online Volkodav

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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #16 on: May 24, 2014, 08:45:25 AM »
Thankyou , that's my FW190A-8 sorted  :)

Offline apophenia

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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #17 on: May 25, 2014, 09:37:09 AM »
Ack! I've just read that the RW CA-14A had a cooling fan inspired by the Fw 190's BMW 801! Well, so much for original concepts  :P

Greg: I'm liking your CAC/Focke-Wulf connection concept. I'm looking forward to seeing where you go with this :)
________________________________________

'Super Boomer' - The Commonwealth Aircraft CA-14 Wallaby - Part 4

The production Wallaby was to be the CA-14A and very high priority was assigned. But delays are inevitable in such programmes and the Wallaby was no exception. To speed the process, CAC fitted the prototype Wallaby with a 1,200 hp Pratt & Whitney R-1830-S3C4G Twin Wasp from the CA-12 Boomerang. With this temporary engine, the unarmed prototype was able to first fly on 30 October 1943.

[Top] Prototype CA-14 Wallaby (A56-010) as rolled out. The wing and undercarriage of this aircraft were reclaimed Fw 190A-4 components. As a security precaution, CA-14 ADF serials followed the sequence applied to RAAF P-43 Lancer fighters.

The first R-2000 radials completed by CAC Engine Division were intended for CA-11B Woomera bombers. Despite lacking a gun synchonization gear, this engine was selected to re-engine the CA-14 prototype and to power the pre-production run of CA-14A Wallabys. As a result, the planned 6-gun fighter armament was abandoned in favour of twin .5" Browning heavy machine guns in the outer wing positions. All nine pre-production CA-14As were assigned to No. 5 (Tactical Reconnaissance) Squadron of the RAAF.

[Bottom] The fifth CA-14A Wallaby Mk.IA, 'Recce Robin' of No. 5 (TR) Sqn while based at Bouganville in the Soloman Islands, 1944. Flown by P/O C. Rasmussen, this aircraft was A56-015 but the serial has been overpainted with a coat of locally-mixed PR Blue applied to all lower surfaces.

[To be continued]
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Offline upnorth

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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #18 on: May 25, 2014, 05:00:58 PM »
Great concept and some very fetching profiles. I'll be following closely.  :)
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Offline apophenia

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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #19 on: May 26, 2014, 05:20:20 AM »
'Super Boomer' - The Commonwealth Aircraft CA-14 Wallaby - Part 5

The CA-14A Wallaby Mk.II fighter went to war armed with six .5" Browning guns. In theory, the weight of fire was equivalent to the RAAF's imported Kittyhawk fighters. But, in reality, four of those guns were synchronized to fire through the propeller disc. To increase the weight of fire, CAC had proposed reverse-engineering the Fw 190's Mauser MG 151/20 cannon.

While CAC's design work on the Mauser gun was quickly accomplished, Canberra concluded that the Australian armaments industry was over-stretched. But it was not only the RAAF that was interested in the MG 151/20. Captured examples of the Mauser had also been examined by the Australian Army and the RAN. Both services realized that the MG 151/20 would make a superior light AA cannon to the 20mm Oerlikon. A 'shadow factory' scheme was approved.

What became known as the AC-20 was acknowledged as a CAC design but actual assembly was by the Lithgow Small Arms Factory (Lithgow, NSW) with component production shared among WT Carmichael Ltd (Sidney, NSW) with Diecasters Ltd and Gregory Steel Products Pty (both of Collingwood, VIC). Ammunition for the AC-20 was produced by 'MC' Munitions Finsbury (SA) and 'MF' Munitions Footscray (VIC). Initially, 'AC' was for 'Auto Cannon' but that was soon changed to 'Australian Cannon' to reflect this weapons 'universal' status.

Priority delivery for the AC-20 was to major RAN warships (to replace twin Oerlikons) and RAAF fighters (replacing the wing 'Fifties' in later CA-14A Wallabys and Hispanos in late-production CA-13 Boomerangs). Neither the Australian Army nor the RAAF would receive any ground mount AC-20s prior to the end of the War in the Pacific.

« Last Edit: May 27, 2014, 07:18:34 AM by apophenia »
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Offline apophenia

  • Suffered two full days of rapid-fire hallucinations and yet had not a single usuable whif concept in the lot !?!
  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #20 on: May 27, 2014, 07:20:51 AM »
'Super Boomer' - The Commonwealth Aircraft CA-14 Wallaby - Part 6

The first production CA-14A Wallaby armed with the AC-20 cannon was the Mk.III. Due to initial shortages of AC-20s, cannons were installed only in the wing-root bays with .5" Browning machine guns retained in the outer wings. Surviving Mk.IIIs were later fitted with outer wing bomb racks as Wallaby Mk.IIIAs. These aircraft replaced CA-12 Boomerangs in No.5 Squadron service in 1945.

[Top] A factory-fresh CA-14A Wallaby Mk.III at Fisherman's Bend, awaiting delivery to its RAAF unit.

The full armament of twin cowl-mounted 'fifies' and four wing-mounted AC-20 cannons first appeared on the Wallaby Mk.IV. The Wallaby Mk.V was essentially similar other than minor changes to electrical systems. A more noticeable change was its revised canopy. The reduced framing on this sliding hood was meant to address on-going pilot complaints of poor rearward vision.

[Bottom] 'Hot Stuff!' of 'B' Flight, No.78 Squadron, shows recognition marks in the form of white bands (on the spinner and chord-wise across the wings, and on the tailplane). This white 'reco' markings were applied in the field after a No.5 Sqn Wallaby was shot down by a USAAF P-38 (which, apparently, mistook the Australian fighter for a Japanese Hayabusa).
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Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #21 on: May 28, 2014, 11:52:36 AM »
Those look great, apophenia! Especially the bottom one of the two with the new canopy and white tail!

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Old Wombat

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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #22 on: May 28, 2014, 08:37:31 PM »
I'm loving this plane! :-*
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Offline buzzbomb

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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #23 on: May 29, 2014, 06:37:46 AM »
Yes lots of love here as well.
It just looks right and the storyline is well crafted as well.


Offline Silver Fox

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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #24 on: May 29, 2014, 08:50:49 AM »
That's areal pretty plane. It just looks...right. :)

Offline Old Wombat

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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #25 on: May 29, 2014, 10:12:30 AM »
Hmm!? apophenia, any chance of a naval version with a V-frame hook in the fuselage? ???

Ideas & plans are forming! ;)


Now, I just need to get my hands on an Eduard 1/48th Fw190A-8/R-2 & a Special Hobby 1/48 CAC 13 Boomerang.

... and add them to the stash & put this on the To Do List for the next few years ... :icon_crap:


Anyone know the quality of the ARII/Microace Fw190A-8, as a sub for the Eduard kit?
"This is the Captain. We have a little problem with our engine sequence, so we may experience some slight turbulence and, ah, explode."

Offline apophenia

  • Suffered two full days of rapid-fire hallucinations and yet had not a single usuable whif concept in the lot !?!
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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #26 on: May 29, 2014, 11:09:13 AM »
Many thanks folks!  Old Wombat: what sort of scheme did you have in mind for this nautical Wallaby ?
__________________________________________

'Super Boomer' - The Commonwealth Aircraft CA-14 Wallaby - Part 7

A further attempt was made to improve rearward vision with the Wallaby Mk.VI. The scalloped rear windows inherited from the Boomerang were replaced with a more fully-glazed panel behind the cockpit. This new rear glazing matched with the 'clear view' sliding canopy somewhat improved the pilot's view to the rear.

Other than its rear fuselage decking, the Wallaby Mk. VI was much like the Mk.V.

[Top] Wallaby A56-063 was a company trials Mk.IV converted as the prototype Mk.VI. But A56-063 was not finished to final  Mk.VI standards. This aircraft retained its original framed sliding hood and its 'extra', curved rear perspex panels were not adopted for the production Mk.VI.

The Wallaby Mk.X introduced a cut-down rear fuselage decking with clear-vision panels behind the sliding hood. This inovation was dubbed the 'Jap Cap' for its resemblance to the Zero fighter's canopy. This arrangement finally satisfied RAAF pilots' demands for superior Wallaby rear vision.

The Wallaby Mk.XA reverted to outboard Browning machine guns to allow for the added weight of ordnance carried on the wing racks (US B7 bomb shackles). The Wallaby Mk.XA was employed as a replacement for Boomerang fighter-bombers or, as below, in the fighter-recce role.

[Bottom] LB+K of No.84 Squadron flown by Flt Lt WRC Mcculloch from Higgins Field on Horn Island  off the northernmost tip of Queensland's Cape York Peninsula. Most of No.84's aircraft were Wallaby Mk.Xs but 'K' was one of a handful of recce Mk.XAs used to drop aircraft flare bombs.

[To be continued]
Under investigation by the Committee of State Sanctioned Modelling, Alternative History and Tractor Carburettor Production for decadent counterrevolutionary behaviour.

Offline apophenia

  • Suffered two full days of rapid-fire hallucinations and yet had not a single usuable whif concept in the lot !?!
  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #27 on: June 08, 2014, 12:10:01 PM »
'Super Boomer' - The Commonwealth Aircraft CA-14 Wallaby - Part 8

With its cut-down rear fuselage, the Wallaby Mk.X had addressed RAAF complaints about visibility to the rear. But Commonwealth's ultimate answer to rearward vision was the sliding bubble canopy of the Wallaby F.Mk.XI. Other than changes to the upper decking to accommodate the new canopy, the Wallaby Mk.XI was essentially similar to the Mk.X.

[Top] Most of the Wallaby F.Mk.XIs were delivered after the end of hostilities. This example went to No.1 Air Performance Unit at Laverton, Victoria for test purposes. Shown here sprayed in the immediate postwar RAAF scheme of all-over silver with 'centreless' roundels.

A56-338 has had its lower undercarriage covers removed for wet field trials while carrying 1,000 lb bombs from its centreline bomb rack. This aircraft was later tested with Rheinmetall-Borsig MK 103 cannons in underwing pods.

The Wallaby Mk.XI was actually preceeded into service by the interim Mk.XII. The latter were production-line conversions of partially completed Wallaby Mk.Xs. Wallaby Mk.XIIAs were four cannon fighters, Wallaby Mk.XIIBs were tactical reconnaissance aircraft with outboard AC-20s replaced by 0.50" Brownings to save weight.
 
[Bottom] This near-new Wallaby Mk.XIIB had joined No.76 Squadron's Wallaby Mk.Xs on Goodenough Island north of New Guinea just prior to Japan's surrender. A56-307 has lost its cowl guns -- presumably a local field modification aimed at further weight reduction.

A56-307 wears the standard late-war RAAF scheme of all-over Foliage Green with factory-applied white recognition markings. Squadrons in the field often extended the reco markings to wing tips and entire cowlings.

[To be continued ... sort of]
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Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #28 on: June 09, 2014, 03:50:21 AM »
 :)
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Offline Old Wombat

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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #29 on: June 09, 2014, 10:03:24 PM »
Old Wombat: what sort of scheme did you have in mind for this nautical Wallaby ?

No idea, mate, I was just going to make it up as I went along but I suppose a late-war RN BPF scheme with the white recognition markings as per the RAAF versions might be appropriate.

Oh, & a straight-arm hook might be more logical than the V(or A)-frame.

:)
"This is the Captain. We have a little problem with our engine sequence, so we may experience some slight turbulence and, ah, explode."