Author Topic: Willi Fronhöfer's Heinkel He 100D-2 - Battle of Britain  (Read 1818 times)

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
  • Rivet-counting whiffer
Willi Fronhöfer's Heinkel He 100D-2 - Battle of Britain
« on: December 10, 2013, 03:10:46 AM »
Thanks for the kind words, everyone!  As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page.



Full backstory below:

Quote
On 31 August, JG 26 mounted various missions throughout the day and claimed 22 victories for the loss of five aircraft and pilots, the heaviest loss of pilots in a single day during the whole of the Battle of Britain. During a late afternoon mission the entire Geschwader took off to rendezvous with KG 76, which was to attack the RAF aerodrome at Hornchurch. As soon as the aircraft of Stab III./JG 26 crossed the coast, they were attacked by RAF fighters and Oblt. Wilhelm Fronhöfer of 9./JG 26 was one of three pilots shot down.  His aircraft, 'Yellow 10' was shot down by a Spitfire piloted by P/O C.F. Gray of RAF No. 54 Squadron. Fronhöfer made a force landing at Jubilee Hill Farm, Ulcombe, Sussex, England. He was uninjured. Fronhöfer had three kills to his credit at the time he was shot down. One known victory, his 1st, a Mureaux at Löwen on 15 May, 1940. His 2nd, a Spitfire I west of Dunkirk, 29 May, 1940. His 3rd, a Hurricane of RAF No. 141 Sq. at Folkestone on 15 August, 1940.

With an upper scheme of 70/71 Fronhöfer He 100D-2, WrNr 1184, was finished in the commonly seen III./JG 26 high demarcation camouflage style with no discernible mottling on the sides of the fuselage, fin or rudder. In keeping with the other aircraft of this Gruppe, the Balkenkreuz, Gruppe bar and aircraft number were smaller than usually seen. The 9. Staffel Hollenhund emblem and JG 26 'Schlageter' shield were carried on both sides of the fuselage beneath the cockpit. It is understood that the tip of the spinner was a lighter green than the remainder. The Werk Nummer on the fin is applied on a dark green rectangular background indicating that this aircraft was originally finished in a low-demarcation 70/71 camouflage scheme.


Cheers,

Logan

Offline Queeg

  • Master armour builder
  • Lost but now foun .... nope - still lost!
Re: Willi Fronhöfer's Heinkel He 100D-2 - Battle of Britain
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2013, 03:28:45 AM »
That's a thing of beauty Logan!   I've always liked that marking suite too, I had it on my first Airfix 1/24th '109.

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
  • Rivet-counting whiffer
Re: Willi Fronhöfer's Heinkel He 100D-2 - Battle of Britain
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2013, 03:50:28 AM »
Thanks, Queeg!  It wasn't a plane that belonged to an ace, let alone a well-known one, but it was a scheme that I love.

Alright, here's the progression as documented in four steps.



So, this is how it looked when I left it over a year ago.  This may look pretty far along, but it's actually just Galland's He 100 with a lot of layers deleted.  It's basically stripped down ready to be built back up again.  Almost nothing unique to this profile exists yet.



We're sadly not much further along at this point.  I added the wing root camo, as well, but I'd later take it away, put it back again, and slice most of it off.



It doesn't look like much other than the Hollenhund (which is pretty), but the camo is actually all new here.



There was actually a LOT done here.  The camo was modified, the numbers were added, and--most difficult of all--the weathering was all redone.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline taiidantomcat

  • Plastic Origamist...and not too shabby with the painting either!
  • Global Moderator
  • Stylishly late...because he was reading comics
Re: Willi Fronhöfer's Heinkel He 100D-2 - Battle of Britain
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2013, 07:47:44 AM »
Interesting to see the camo extend to the prop and disappear, on the wing root -- Interesting little tweaks. Very cool overall Logan! Great to see it done  :)
"They know you can do anything, So the question is, what don't you do?"

-David Fincher