Author Topic: Apophenia's Offerings  (Read 458262 times)

Offline apophenia

  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #950 on: December 21, 2013, 11:04:04 AM »
Wow, many thanks for the kind words and good wishes Lady and Gents. It means a lot! I'm on the mend ... but slowly.
"Like a hog dance; Like a pig dare; Mind warp deceptor wan ..."

Offline apophenia

  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #951 on: December 21, 2013, 11:06:24 AM »
Il Figlio di Breda 27 metallico -- the Breda 66

The Società Italiana Ernesto Breda was an early proponent of low-winged monoplane fighters, having produced the braced monoplane Breda 27 in 1933-35. Intended as a Ba.27 replacement, the Breda 66 fighter adopted the more advanced construction techniques of the Breda 65 as well as many of that attack aircraft's major components.

As was the case with the Breda 27, the Regia Aeronautica tested the new fighter but placed no order. However, the Republic of China Air Force was anxious to replace its battle-worn Breda 27 fleet and a dozen Breda 66 fighters were purchased in early 1937.

Breda 66 airframes were shipped to Kouang-Tchéou-Wan accompanied by Breda technicians who assembled them upon arrival in the French territory. After tests, the completed Breda 66s were flown to Nanning for familiarization training, before replacing the worn-out Breda 27s.

Top: Breda 66 #804 is shown here in its delivery colours. ROCAF markings have been applied but the aircraft retains artifacts of an earlier European sales tour -- large Breda logos on each  fuselage side. Before entering combat in the autumn of 1937, the ROCAF Breda 66s were sprayed in camouflage colours - dark green on the uppers and pale grey on the undersides.

The Chinese regarded the Breda 66 as a solid airframe let down by its unreliable Piaggio Stella P.IX radial. These original Italian engines were later replaced by Shvetsov M-25 radials (in cowlings taken from Polikarpov I-15 biplanes). Fixed armament for the Breda 66 was twin, wing-mounted 7,92 mm Brownings (the optional second pair of wing machine guns never being  fitted to the ROCAF fighters).

Just Add Water -- the Fiat/CMASA ICR.36 Float Fighter

The first low-winged Fiat fighter in Regia Aeronautica service came about almost by accident. Fiat designer, Giuseppe Gabrielli, had begun work on his new G.48 fighter but the pace of progress was very slow. Part of the delay was due to the unavailability of the fighter's Fiat A.37 V-12 engine (a 26 L derivative of the A.30 stroked to 152 mm).

Construction of G.48 components had begun at a CMASA, a Fiat subsidiary at Marina di Pisa. Fed  up with the delays, Fiat management ordered CMASA designer, Manlio Stiavelli, to adapt the completed G.48 wing components to fulfil a Servizio Aeronautico della Regia Marina requirement for a float fighter to replace the IMAM Ro.44 biplane.

Ing. Stiavelli's solution was to mate the G.48 wing panels to the steel-tube fuselage of the Fiat CR.32 (which he did under the direction of Gabrielli's great rival, Celestino Rosatelli). The twin floats were mounted with a simple set of bracing struts. Due to the chimerical nature  of the design, prototype construction was completed very quickly and the RM ordered 20 of these float fighters as the Fiat/CMASA ICR.36.

The ICR.36 were issued to the Squadriglie Caccia Marittima both in Italy and the Aegean. The fighter was popular with RM pilots but tricky for novices to handle - especially when landing in heavy seas. To familiarize new pilots, an operational conversion unit was formed at the Pola training school at Puntisella. The aircraft illustrated here wears the POL markings of the Pola school.
"Like a hog dance; Like a pig dare; Mind warp deceptor wan ..."

Offline Silver Fox

  • Talk to me Goose!
Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #952 on: December 21, 2013, 12:49:57 PM »
The Breda always makes me think that someone traced a Seversky product badly... forgot to trace the windscreen and then built it with flat plate where the canopy ended. :)

Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #953 on: December 21, 2013, 05:03:42 PM »
Back in style!

Good to see You're with us again, Apophenia!
... and kill me again
or take me as I am,
for I shall not change...
never...

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #954 on: December 22, 2013, 01:19:58 AM »
Those look great, apophenia!  Well done!

Cheers,

Logan

Offline lauhof52

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #955 on: December 22, 2013, 01:48:30 AM »
Very nice! :)

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #956 on: December 22, 2013, 04:28:38 AM »
That ICR.36 Float Fighter just must be built! :)
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

You can't outrun Death forever.
But you can make the Bastard work for it.

Offline apophenia

  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #957 on: December 25, 2013, 12:01:40 PM »
Thanks lads ... here's some more:

Yugoslav Harrier -- an Hispano-Suiza powered Hawker Fighter

The 'Yugoslav Harrier' was ordered as part of the 1935 modernization of Vazduhoplovstvo Vojske Kraljevine Jugoslavije. The first Harrier variant received by the  VVKJ was the Harrier Series 1 or 'Fairey Float Fighter' but that aircraft's Seafox landing gear proved too light. In early 1938, the surviving floatplanes were converted into land fighters by Zmaj (using new, Hawker-supplied wing sets).

The Zmaj conversions (Harrier Series 4) could be distinguished from other Yugoslav-assembled Harriers by their non-retractable tailwheels and armament. Harrier Series 2 aircraft were armed with 3 x 7.92 mm FN-Browning machine guns, Series 3 by twin 7.92 mm guns and an Oerlikon motor-cannon. Only the Series 1 and 4 Harrier had the 20mm HS-404 cannon.

Markings are the original overall silver-grey with the 'Kosovski krst' (Kosovo’s cross) roundels in four wing positions and Yugoslav tricolour rudder striping. These fighters were later resprayed in 3-colour upper camouflage with white aircraft numbers on the fuselage sides.

'Persian Harrier' - Napier-powered Hawker Fighter

The Imperial Iranian Air Force was the only buyer for the Dagger-powered Hawker Houri. These aircraft were intended for desert enviroments and meant as a stablemate for the 2-seat Hawker Hector. Iran's Hawker Houris (or Hūrī) were assembled at Bushehr and formed the fighter component of the IIAF's mixed type squadrons.

Houri #213 has been resprayed in the 1940 two-colour sand/stone camouflage scheme (some Houri also having their rudder stripes over-painted). This aircraft (which has had its canopy removed for some reason) was destroyed on the ground at Ahvaz airfield by RAF strafing on 27 August 1941.
« Last Edit: December 27, 2013, 09:42:47 AM by apophenia »
"Like a hog dance; Like a pig dare; Mind warp deceptor wan ..."

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #958 on: December 25, 2013, 12:02:49 PM »
 :)
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

You can't outrun Death forever.
But you can make the Bastard work for it.

Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #959 on: December 25, 2013, 05:35:51 PM »
Well, I don't know was this intentionally, but I feel flattered by seeing that Royal Yugoslav Air Force Harrier.

Great work, A!
... and kill me again
or take me as I am,
for I shall not change...
never...

Offline PR19_Kit

  • Likes to brag about how long his...wings are.
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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #960 on: December 26, 2013, 06:22:51 AM »
'Persian Harrier' - Napier-powered Hawker Fighter

The Imperial Iranian Air Force was the only buyer for the Dagger-powered Hawker Houri.

I was planning to build a Dagger Hurricane, it'll be a lot easier now I've seen it for real. Nice job.  :))
Regards
Kit

--------------------------
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings

Offline apophenia

  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #961 on: December 27, 2013, 09:44:18 AM »
Thanks folks!

I was planning to build a Dagger Hurricane, it'll be a lot easier now I've seen it for real. Nice job.  :))

Looking forward to seeing that PR19!  Just remember to remove the radiator bath ... I forgot the first time through  :-[
"Like a hog dance; Like a pig dare; Mind warp deceptor wan ..."

Offline PR19_Kit

  • Likes to brag about how long his...wings are.
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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #962 on: December 27, 2013, 08:28:40 PM »
Yes indeed, the Dagger's air-cooled for crying out loud!

But it doesn't look as if it should be for some reason, really weird, but it looked superb, especially on the MB2.
« Last Edit: December 27, 2013, 08:30:14 PM by PR19_Kit »
Regards
Kit

--------------------------
Any aircraft can be improved by fitting longer wings

Offline Silver Fox

  • Talk to me Goose!
Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #963 on: December 28, 2013, 08:14:59 AM »
In an Iraqi example you could always claim it is an oil cooler. :)

Offline Tophe

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #964 on: December 28, 2013, 02:45:24 PM »
Nice Huri, thanks! :-*

Offline apophenia

  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #965 on: January 02, 2014, 08:32:48 AM »
Happy New Year to all!

In an Iraqi example you could always claim it is an oil cooler. :)
   ;D

Curtiss Aeroplane Company and Curtiss Aero-Engines

In the aftermath of the 1929 stock market crash, enforcement of US anti-trust laws regained some favour. As a token gesture, Washington disallowed the early merger of Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor and Wright Aeronautical companies. Accordingly, the new Curtiss-Wright company was dissolved. In January 1930, Curtiss reformed as the new Curtiss Aeroplane Company with a separate Curtiss Aero-Engines (CAE) division.

While Curtiss' aircraft order books were healthy, the aero-engine section had dwindled in anticipation of a shift to Wright air-cooled radial powerplants in future Curtiss aircraft. To make matter worse, Curtiss' won air-cooled H-1640 Chieftain proved a failure and the USAAC ceased development funding for the long-lived V-1570 Conqueror range of liquid-cooled V-12s. Curtiss Aero-Engines needed a shot in the arm.

Although dating back to 1924, the Conqueror series offered the best chance of success. What was needed was a boost in power for the heavier V-12 to match the performance in the new breed of air-cooled radials. To this end, CAE developed the Curtiss V-1647 Curvet. The Curvet was a Conqueror evolution but the two engine types shared few parts -- freeing Curtiss from any USAAC claims to 'ownership' of the new design.

The Curvet retained the Conqueror's 6.3386-inch stroke but increased cylinder bore to 5.626-inches. Early versions of this 27 litre V-12 developed 850 hp giving them a comfortable performance edge over the contemporary Wright Cyclone radials. Although not specifically aimed at the USAAC, Curtiss Aero-Engines adopted the 'designation' V-1647 to market their Curvet V-12.

Even before the breakup of Curtiss-Wright, design work had begun on a low-winged monoplane development of Curtiss' successful Hawk series of biplane fighters. Interest was expressed by several potential export customers and adaptation of the Hawk airframe to its new Model 64 'MonoHawk' configuration began in the summer of 1931. The first export sales were to Colombia and Boliva, both of which had chosen Cyclone-engined MonoHawks.

With an apparent export success on their hands, the Curtiss Board then made an uncoventional decision. Cyclone-engined Model 64 production was brought to an abrupt halt. Henceforth, all MonoHawks would be powered by Curtiss Curvet liquid-cooled V-12s.

Continued backstory to follow ...
"Like a hog dance; Like a pig dare; Mind warp deceptor wan ..."

Offline apophenia

  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #966 on: January 02, 2014, 08:36:57 AM »
Curtiss Model 64 MonoHawk

The first order for Curtiss' new Model 64 fighter came from Colombia. Along with 20 Falcons and 20 Curtiss Hawk IIs, 10 MonoHawks were ordered for the Fuerza Aérea Colombiana in August of 1932. The aerial defence of Bogotá was the original FAC plan for the MonoHawks. However, everything changed with the Letiçia Incident.

In late Dec 1932, the FAC fleet of Curtiss aircraft were fitted with floats and flown south to the Amazonas Department. The MonoHawks were based at El Encanto, an Armada Nacional base at the mouth of the Caraparaná River made available to FAC. The MonoHawks performed well making the most of their speed advantage. One aircraft (844) shared a kill (a CAP Douglas O-38P, 12VG4) with a Puerto Arica-based Hawk II.

(Top) FAC hidroavione MonoHawk 841, ANC El Encanto, Feb 1933. Note that this aircraft is fitted with a long-range belly tank, Curtiss Electic constant-speed propeller, and, like all float MonoHawks, retains its tail wheel.

The two-tone 'Amazonas' scheme degraded performance slightly but camouflaged the FAC fighters in their preferred climbing attacks. The original silver-grey dope is retained on the under surfaces. Yellow ID panels have been added to the rudder, cowling, and wing tips. The individual aircraft number was also re-applied in yellow.

The Letiçia coat of arms on the fuselage sides became the crest for Escuadrón de Combate 100.  During the Letiçia Incident, EdC 100 fighters also had individual names applied. MonoHawk 841 was dubbed 'Hiracüño' (a local Huitoto word meaning 'wild bee'). MonoHawk 841 was lost in the Caraparaná on 16 April 1933 when Subteniente Juan Manuel Garzon stalled his fighter on approach.

Curtiss Model 65 'Cannoneer'

A prototype V-12 Model 64 powered by a V-1570 Conqueror had been flown in late 1931. The first V-1647 Curvet-powered MonoHawk, NX-1647, was retained by Curtiss as a demonstrator for several  years. In the Spring of 1933, NX-1647 was fitted with the new V-1647-20 'motor-gun' Curvet. This engine had a hollow propeller shaft allowing for the use of an unsynchronized machine gun or cannon.

Dubbed the Curtiss 'Cannoneer', the Model 65 demonstrator attracted considerable foreign attention. As part of its marketing strategy, Curtiss formed an alliance with Dansk Industri Syndikat to market the Madsen 20mm cannon which Curtiss would also build under licence. For the 1934 display season, the Model 65 had its cowl machine guns removed and a Madsen guns slung under each wing in a neat pod (with the shell drum enclosed in the wing itself). This variation on the 'Cannoneer' would represent the most heavily-armed single-engine fighter for some time. But all customers for the Model 65 preferred a single Madsen cannon with twin machine guns.

"Like a hog dance; Like a pig dare; Mind warp deceptor wan ..."

Offline elmayerle

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #967 on: January 02, 2014, 09:16:33 AM »
Very attractive aircraft and an interesting backstory; 'twill be rather interesting to see where this goes.  The large engine history in the US is tangled, especially when you consider that Pratt & Whitney Engines was founded by a bunch of dis-satisfied Wright engineers.

Offline apophenia

  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #968 on: January 17, 2014, 11:52:57 AM »
Curtiss 2-Seat Fighters

Curtiss knew that its MonoHawk would soon be dated but first turned its attention to a more modern concept, the 2-seat Model 70 'Shrike Fighter'. Fuselage construction was similar to the Model 60 Shrike but this was now mated to a multi-spar cantilever wing.

Intended as an 'Escort Fighter', the Model 70 prototype was acepted by the US Army Air Corps as the Cohort, designated XPB-3 (in the short-lived Pursuit, Biplace category). This prototype was returned to Curtiss where, as the XPB-3A, it was fitted with a more fully-retractable  undercarriage -- the original underwing 'gondolas' being replaced by smaller fairings for main wheels that rotated 90° upon retraction.

Following trials at Wright Field, a production run of 24 aircraft was approved -- these Y1PB-3As replacing Berliner-Joyce PB-1 biplanes in the 95th Pursuit Squadron.

A second Model 70 prototype was created aimed at the US Navy. This aircraft was powered by Curtiss' new air-cooled Chieftain II engine. Initially designated XF12C-1, the naval fighter had its pilot's position moved forward and a fuel tank inserted between the two cockpits.

After trials at Pax River, the prototype's vertical tail fin was revised and move forward for greater control authority at higher angles of attack. Later, the tail arrangement was changed again -- to a high-mounted horizontal tailplane with a larger, rounded rudder.

Perforated flaps were then added, turning this fighter into a divebomber. This Model 70N entered US Nay service as the SBC-1 Helldiver. After brief shipboard service, the SBC-1s were turned over to the Marine Corps. Carrier squadrons took on SBN-2 (NAF-built Helldivers with Cyclone radials) while Curtiss continued to supply the USMC with Chieftain II-powered Helldivers.
"Like a hog dance; Like a pig dare; Mind warp deceptor wan ..."

Offline Tophe

  • He sees things in double...
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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #969 on: January 17, 2014, 12:33:57 PM »
Nice Curtiss addition, thanks! (so much better than Real World...)

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #970 on: January 18, 2014, 02:51:45 AM »
Nice - the Cohort has a somewhat  IL-2 Sturmovik look to it.  Maybe a ground attack variant is in the future?? ;)
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

You can't outrun Death forever.
But you can make the Bastard work for it.

Offline apophenia

  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #971 on: January 22, 2014, 11:40:18 AM »
Nice - the Cohort has a somewhat  IL-2 Sturmovik look to it.  Maybe a ground attack variant is in the future?? ;)

Not a bad idea ... a follow-on from the A-12 Shrike. Hmmm ...
"Like a hog dance; Like a pig dare; Mind warp deceptor wan ..."

Offline apophenia

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #972 on: January 22, 2014, 11:45:31 AM »
Curtiss Model 74 / XF13C-1 SeaHawk Carrier Fighter Prototypes

The Curtiss Model 74 was designed to answer a 1935 US Navy requirement for a new aircraft carrier fighter. As a Grumman F3F replacement, the Model 74 was up against the Brewster B-239,  Grumman Model 16, and a Seversky private venture, the NF-1 (as well as unbuilt proposals from Vought and Bellanca).

Curtiss' Model 74 sprang directly from the 2-seat Model 70N. The wings were essentially Model  70 outer panels with the centre section deleted. The retractable undercarriage units were moved outboard as were the machine gun bays. The single-seat fighter retained the air-cooled Curtiss Chieftain II powerplant.

The USN had already shown its preference for the Wright R-1820 engine -- this radial powering the other three 1935 entries. In the end, the Navy preferred the Brewster entry (bought as the XF2A-1) and a revised Grumman design (bought as the XF4F-1). But Curtiss was in a position to deliver a prototype fighter sooner than its competition.

The prototype Model 74 flew in early April 1935. Although not their desired type, the Navy was intrigued by the Model 74's constant-speed four-bladed Curtiss Electric propeller. Also of interest were the neat cockpit canopy arrangement and the streamlined carrier hook.

The completed Model 74 prototype was delivered to NAS Patuxent River for testing as the XF13C-1 (dubbed, unofficially, the SeaHawk). Almost immediately, problems were apparent. Directional control was inadequate and the canopy -- although providing excellent visibility -- rattled excessively and, on one occasion, parted company with the aircraft in flight. The XF13C-1 was returned to Curtiss for modifications.

Curtiss redesigned the cockpit canopy altogether and took the opportunity to enlarge the rear fuselage fuel tank (conforming its shape to the revised upper fuselage line). The tailplane was enlarged and the supercharger intake was shortened to address another USN pilot complaints.

The revised XF13C-1A prototype was returned to Pax River for further testing. These tests were of singularly short duration. On its fourth flight, the USN test pilot took the wire in a simulated carrier landing. The aircraft landed safely but the stress of the arrestor wire and abrupt tail strike broke the back of the XF13C-1A.

The remains of the XF13C-1 were returned to Curtiss where the prototype was rebuilt as the Model 74E, an export fighter using simpler construction methods.
______________________________
"Like a hog dance; Like a pig dare; Mind warp deceptor wan ..."

Offline Tophe

  • He sees things in double...
  • twin-boom & asymmetric fan
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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #973 on: January 22, 2014, 12:53:30 PM »
In the end, the Navy preferred the Brewster entry (bought as the XF2A-1) and a revised Grumman design (bought as the XF4F-1).
So, this XF13C of 1935, if selected, could have been as famous a warbird as the Buffalo and Wildcat? Wow!

Offline lauhof52

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #974 on: January 22, 2014, 03:05:08 PM »
Nice plane and nice story too! :)