Author Topic: Apophenia's Offerings  (Read 445735 times)

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2650 on: September 30, 2020, 03:01:06 AM »
I wonder...were the RAAF Lances sold to anyone... ;)
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Offline ChernayaAkula

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2651 on: September 30, 2020, 11:14:45 AM »
Apophenia's posts tend to do much stash searching/ebaying!

True dat!  :smiley:
Cheers,
Moritz

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Offline apophenia

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2652 on: October 01, 2020, 04:58:32 AM »
Thanks folks!

I wonder...were the RAAF Lances sold to anyone... ;)

I wasn't planning to do more ... but they would look good with Kiwi roundels and slung with anti-shipping missiles  :D
"How many moles do you suppose they're keeping?;
Don't make a sound they're not dead, just sleeping"

Offline apophenia

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2653 on: October 03, 2020, 11:19:08 AM »
I said that I wouldn't, but I have ...  ;)

________________________________________


Project Karearea - Swedish Lance into a New Zealand Falcon

In 1974, the Government of New Zealand availed itself of the opportunity of purchasing retired RAAF aircraft at steeply discounted prices. The gem in this deal were twenty Saab (GAF) AF-32 Lance 2-seat fighters. These Swedish-built aircraft had been retired from RAAF service in 1969 and had been languishing in open storages at the Woomera Prohibited Area. The Lance was a rather large fighter but their purchase helped make up for the cancellation of a A-4K/TA-4K Skyhawk buy back in 1970.

After some refurbishment by the Government Aircraft Factory (a component of the purchase deal), the first Lances were ferried to RNZAF Base Ohakea where they were taken on strength by No 2 Squadron RNZAF - that unit later providing Lance pilot conversion for No 75 Squadron and the recently-reformed No. 26 Squadron. The latter unit was stood up again specifically for the maritime strike role. The F-32 Lance - as it was referred to by the Kiwis - certainly had the range for this role but its load-out of 30 mm cannons and unguided rockets was consider less than ideal. [1] However, armament and sensor improvements would have to wait for the time being.

Between 1976 and 1978, a series of incremental improvements and updated were made to the Kiwi F-32 fleet. That these 20-year-old aircraft were becoming outdated was obvious but the sturdy airframes had life in them yet. The most important upgrade was the replacement of the original Saab Mk 1 rocket-boosted ejection seats with new Martin-Baker PB Mk 4B 'bang seats' (as used in the RNZAF's Strikemasters). The aging CAC-built Rolls-Royce Avon engines were also replaced over time - by later-model Svenska Flygmotor RM6s (the Swedish-built variant of the Avon). Investigations were also made into modernizing avionics and sensors, but action on these items would have to wait for a more comprehensive Lance upgrade programme.

Project Karearea - Swedish Lance into a New Zealand Falcon

In 1983, the RNZAF initiated Project Karearea [2] to improve the capabilities of its ex-RAAF Saab Lance fleet. It was originally planned that the original Swedish PS-432/A radar would be replaced by the Ferranti Airpass II Blue Parrot (as on the Blackburn Buccaneer) and a trial installation was made prior to the launch of Project Karearea. Testing of the so-called F-32X 'test mule' suggested that the RNZAF should find a more modern search radar (as well as a better anti-shipping missile than the Hawker Siddeley/Matra AS 37 Marte). Fortunately, Saab had already tested the PS-37/A radar (intended for the new JA37 Viggen) on a J32 Lansen airframe. This set was chosen for the Project Karearea radar upgrade. [3]

Bottom The sole F-32X trials mule seen in later days. In No 14 Sqn service, NZ6203 was dubbed 'Te Muera' ('The Mule'). Here, the F-32X retains its unique Buccaneer radome - although, in 1989, it actually housed a General Instrument ALR-66 radar set on lone for trials.

Note that NZ6203 has also been used to trial the single-seat cockpit mod intended for the unrealized F-32NG upgrade. The rear cockpit space was largely filled with a new fuel tanks (allowing '03 to dispense with the usual Lance belly fairing). The 'hi-viz' markings sported by NZ6203 were unique on Lance wearing the overall green scheme introduced during Project Karearea.

The new LM Ericsson PS-37/A monopulse X-band radar introduced by Project Karearea was optimized for maritime tracking. The new radar's big, 70 cm diameter antenna greatly expanded the options for new anti-shipping armament.  of twin, wing-mounted Hawker Siddeley/Matra AS 37 Martel missiles. [3]


Saab proposed integrating the Rb 75, Sweden's version of the AGM-65A Maverick TV-guided missile. However, the David Lange-led Labour government which took power in 1984 was in no mood to buy US-made armaments. This proved to be of little concern to the RNZAF which had taken a shine to the new BAe Sea Eagle - a  sea-skimming, radar-guided missile. That missile was chosen and entered RNZAF service in June 1986. A key perceived advantage of the Sea Eagle was that, once the British missile was launched, it became completely autonomous. The anti-shipping Lances could safely launch their missiles from more than 100 km out and the active radar Sea Eagles would find their own way to the target.

Top A Sea Eagle-armed F-32M Lance of No 75 (Maritime Strike) Squadron, flying out of RNZAF Base Ohakea in late 1986. Note, like all F-32Ms, NZ6209 has four gun ports. In fact, only two 30 mm ADEN cannons were fitted to the F-32M as a weight-savings measure.

Two of the RNZAF's operational squadrons traded primary missions during the Project Karearea upgrades. A former fighter squadron, No 75 received F-32Ms and Sea Eagle missiles. In turn, No 26 became a fighter squadron flying Sidewinder-armed F-32Bs in the interceptor role. [4] No 14 Squadron became the Air Combat Force OTU - flying both the dual-control TF-32 Lance and Jet Provost from RNZAF Base Woodbourne. No 2 Squadron remained at RNZAF base Ohakea but gave up its Lance for BAC Strikemasters. These updated Lances remained in service until 2001 when the Labour Government of Helen Clark eliminated the Air Combat Force from the RNZAF's structure. Although than two preserved examples - one F-32B and one F-32M - the retired Lances were all scrapped at the maintenance facility at Woodbourne.

__________________________________

[1] In early RNZAF service, the Lances usually carried four of six-round, 135 mm Bofors M70 rocket pods.

[2] Karearea is the Maori name for the New Zealand Falcon (Falco novaeseelandiae).

[3] A Ferranti/Elliot dual-band Q/X-band radar had also been examined. However, this set was eliminated from the Project Karearea due to this radar's experimental nature (and unnecessary emphasis on ground-following).

[4] Unlike other upgraded RNZAF Lance variants, the F-32B retained its four-gun fixed armament.
"How many moles do you suppose they're keeping?;
Don't make a sound they're not dead, just sleeping"

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2654 on: October 04, 2020, 02:05:41 AM »
Outstanding! :smiley:
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

You can't outrun Death forever.
But you can make the Bastard work for it.

Offline M.A.D

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2655 on: Yesterday at 07:59:38 AM »
Kim: My guess on the Type 333's reversed gull was Supermarine obsessing on the mountains of data gleaned from wind tunnel tests on R-R's He 70. The question is: were the added manufacturing headaches worth the aerodynamic benefits?

And now on to another unbuilt project ...

'Swords' into Claymores - the Canadair CL-76

For some time, I've been curious about what the Canadair CL-76 project would have looked like if built.

Canadair had hoped to produce a number of evolved CL-13 Sabre designs. Among these unbuilt projects were the CL-13G 2-seat trainer (akin to North American's TF-86F) and the CL-13J with a simplified Bristol afterburner (as compared with the afterburner originally planned for the CL-13C). Later, with the writing on the wall for further 'Sword' production, Canadair made more radical plans.

The 1958 CL-76 project was intended to produce a 2-seat NATO attack aircraft using the maximum number of F-86 and CL-13 components. There were three variants of the proposed CL-76. The first two kept fairly close to the F-86/CL-13 pattern other than being powered by twin engines, pod-mounted on the rear fuselage.

The baseline CL-76 was to be powered by compact Pratt & Whitney Canada JT12 (US military designation J60) fitted with afterburners. The CL-76A proposal was essentially similar to the CL-76 other than being powered by slightly larger Bristol Siddeley Orpheus BOr.12SR turbojets. These engines (TJ37s in the US designation system) would produce 6,810 lbf dry, with 8,170 lbf reheat.

There was also a CL-76B proposal but it involved much more radical airframe changes - 'internal' engines, high-mounted wings, etc. Obviously, the CL-76B was no longer an exercise in recycling exiting F-86/CL-13 components. Rather, those components were to be modified out of all recognition. However, none of these Canadair proposals was taken up by Canada or any other NATO member.

Here, I've shown what I imagine service CL-76 Claymores would have looked like. She's no looker but, to me at least, it was still an interesting design exercise by Canadair.

(Top) A former RCAF Claymore Mk.1A (2 x J60s) in Yugoslav markings. To prolong airframe life, the Yugoslavs removed their Claymores outer weapon pylons.

The Claymore Mk.1s had no fixed gun armament. This aircraft sports a false radome like all RCAF Claymores (the targetting radar was omitted from Canadian airframes as an economy measure).

(Bottom) A Claymore Mk.3 (2 x TJ37s) near the end of its RAF service. This aircraft lacks both inboard and outboard weapon pylons since it is being employed on Claymore pilot refresher courses.

Oh wow....a belated wow 😯
Beautiful profiles Apophenia!!

I've really just been enlightened by the CL-76 program......
The "CL-76B program" you allude to, was that a real-world program? If so could please direct me to the info you might have on the CL-76B program? Also are you planning a profile of this CL-76B???


MAD

Offline Jeffry Fontaine

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #2656 on: Yesterday at 12:09:19 PM »
@Apophenia - I do like where you are going with this Lansen idea.  One of my many slow cooking projects is to try and turn the Lansen in to an ersatz F-86C/YF-93.  Yes, a bit far fetched but it does kind of/sort of resemble an F-86 Sabre if you stretch your imagination.     
"Every day we hear about new studies 'revealing' what should have been obvious to sentient beings for generations; 'Research shows wolverines don't like to be teased" -- Jonah Goldberg