Author Topic: Apophenia's Offerings  (Read 248630 times)

Offline jcf

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #1800 on: July 09, 2018, 08:40:49 AM »
"Evil our grandsires were, our fathers worse;
And we, till now unmatched in ill,
Must leave successors more corrupted still."
Horace, 65BC - 8BC. Marsh translation.

Offline Jeffry Fontaine

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #1801 on: July 09, 2018, 11:45:20 AM »
Thanks Jon.  That looks like it started out as a MiG-17.
"Every day we hear about new studies 'revealing' what should have been obvious to sentient beings for generations; 'Research shows wolverines don't like to be teased" -- Jonah Goldberg

Offline apophenia

  • Suffered two full days of rapid-fire hallucinations and yet had not a single usuable whif concept in the lot !?!
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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #1802 on: July 10, 2018, 04:00:46 AM »
Thanks folks  :D

Jon: Cheers, I'd forgotten about the MiG-17SN  :-[  I love those pivoting guns (it's amazing how often the Real World turns out to much weirder than what-ifs!). Anyway, it looks like Messrs. Mikoyan and Gurevich beat my Chinese 'innovation' by about 15 years  :-[

... Adding AAM to the mix certainly gives it a more dangerous look.

Thanks Jeffry! BTW, RW North Vietnamese MiG-17s could carry a pair of K-13 missiles too.
Under investigation by the Committee of State Sanctioned Modelling, Alternative History and Tractor Carburettor Production for decadent counterrevolutionary behaviour.

Offline apophenia

  • Suffered two full days of rapid-fire hallucinations and yet had not a single usuable whif concept in the lot !?!
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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #1803 on: July 26, 2018, 09:03:00 AM »
Updating the 'Bou

After several failed efforts to procure a replacement for aging Australian Caribou transports, Defence chose to examine the possibility of modernized their DHC-4A airframes including the installation of new turboprop powerplants. This task was assigned to Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation.

Two re-engining options were examined by CAC. The first involved 'upside down' General Electric T-64 turboprops akin to the YT-64-GE-4 turboprops tested on first prototype Caribou airframe back in 1961. The second option involved a turboprop derivative of the Lycoming T55 engine which powered the RAAF's CH-47 Chinook helicopters.

A key consideration for powerplant choice was commonality with in-service engines. A turboprop transport closely related to the Caribou was the DHC-5 Buffalo. These aircraft were powered GE CT64-820-4 turboprops which were closely related to the T64 turboshafts of RAN Seaking helicopters. The proposed Avco (Lycoming) LTC4C-10 was, as mentioned, an evolution of the T55 turboshaft. [1]

Avco Australian undertook development of the TP55-M-10AU (military designation for the LTC4C-10). Core parts were supplied by both Avco US (from 'L-series engines) and Kawasaki Heavy Industries (from 'K-series engines). The turboprop gearbox was an entirely Avco AU product - although it was effectively a much-strengthened derivative of the earlier Lycoming YT55-L-9 transmission. [2] Staff from Avco AU and CAC work together to create the prototype TP55 installation on RAAF Caribou '210'.

The prototype engine installation was regarded as a success but further work was undertaken to refine the design. On the prototype, an S-curved 'swan's neck' pipe carried exhaust gases up to exit above the wing. The upper wing plating in line with this hot efflux was replaced with stainless steel sheeting. Although a simple 'fix', this arrangement also greatly increased the Turbo-Caribou's infrared signature.

Work was begun on a revised exhaust system for 'production' Turbo-Caribou conversions. This system routed the exhaust through a diffuser, mixing the hot gases with cool air from new intake ducts flanking the exhaust duct. This flattened diffuser ended just before the flaps providing a modest degree of surface blowing of those control surfaces. After successful trials, RAAF Caribous were cycled through CAC for heavy maintenance, engine conversions, and systems upgrades - including new radar, avionics, and 'glass' cockpits.

________________________________________________________

[1] The T55 is a free-turbine helicopter turboshaft with five axial compressor stages (plus one centrifugal stage) and no reduction gearing. The TP55 turboprop has seven axial stages and a gearbox.

[2] The 2,455 ehp YT55-L-9 powered the Piper PA-48 Enforcer. That engine could be viewed as a 'big brother' to the T53-L-3 turboprop employed on the Grumman Mohawk.
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Offline Old Wombat

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #1804 on: July 26, 2018, 04:45:43 PM »
Ooh! Turbou looks good! 8)
"This is the Captain. We have a little problem with our engine sequence, so we may experience some slight turbulence and, ah, explode."

Offline Brian da Basher

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #1805 on: July 27, 2018, 05:14:27 AM »
My goodness but do those Supermarine Type 222s have some very lovely, streamlined spats!
 :-* :-* :-* :-*
I will be coming back to look at these marvels again I think.

Your other work is fantastic as well. It's always a treat to see what you've been up to.

Brian da Basher

Offline apophenia

  • Suffered two full days of rapid-fire hallucinations and yet had not a single usuable whif concept in the lot !?!
  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #1806 on: July 28, 2018, 02:30:18 AM »
Thanks folks! And Brian, here's more trousered Supermarines  ;)
_____________________________________________________

Were it not for its connection to the Spitfire, Supermarine's Type 224 fighter would be all but forgotten. Developed to Air Ministry Specification F.7/30, the Type 224 was flown in 1932 and then delivered to Martlesham Heath for trials. The single-seat fighter was judged overly large, lacking in manoeuvrability, and powered by a troublesome engine - the Roll-Royce Goshawk steam-cooled V-12.

When returned to Supermarine, the fighter was rebuilt as a two-seater - the Type 224C - to meet Air Ministry Specification P.30/32 for a divebomber also capable of performing tactical support. This spec was meant as a complement to P.27/32 for a conventional light day bomber - the Fairey Battle, P.30/32 demanded a relatively high performance with points for an airframe based upon an inservice type. Supermarine used the Type 224's extended tenure at RAF Martlesham Heath to claim that aircraft as an inservice type. [1] The rebuilt Supermarine Type 224C was returned to RAF Martlesham Heath for renewed trials.

Modifications to the Type 224 fighter were kept to a minimum. The fuselage was slightly extended to accommodate a lighter Rolls-Royce Kestrel V engine and a second cockpit for the rear gunner. Forward-firing armament was reduced to two machine guns and flaps were introduced to the now metal-skinned wings. [2] Germain to the divebombing role was the mounting of pivoting stub-wings on the undercarriage fairings to act as dive brakes. Main armament was a swinging crutch-mounted 500 lb GP bomb (or a 250 lb GP on the crutch with up to 4 x 50 lb bombs on outer wing racks).

[Top] The Supermarine 224C (K3660) divebomber prototype upon its arrival at RAF Martlesham Heath

The Martlesham Health report criticized the pivoting dive brakes - that installation proving both ineffectual and to be the cause of extreme buffeting - and the new cockpit arrangement - the rear cockpit being extremely cramped while the side-hinged transparent hood did not afford the pilot a clear view on landing. Although the Type 224C was to be a temporary type, its dive brakes clearly needed redesigning. However, Supermarine had already planned for a more capacious rear cockpit and it was a simple matter to modify the pilot's canopy to slide aft for landings.

The Type 224C was also underpowered. To address this, the prototype was re-engined with a new 990 hp Merlin C. Pending solving of the dive brake issue, Supermarine was given another contract for the production of 20 Type 224Cs to be known as the Spectre in RAF service. [3] Rather than attempt to iron out problems with the pivoting stub-wings, Supermarine 'borrowed' a solution from contemporary US Northrop designs. The outer portions of the new wing flaps were perforated to act as dive brakes. The Air Ministry accepted this approach and production began.

The Supermarine Spectre Mk.I entered RAF service in early 1936. On production models, the  fixed, forward-firing armament consisted of two wing-mounted Vickers machine guns and a flexibly-mounted Lewis gun in the rear cockpit (although the latter was often not fitted in service). The 'Spinster' divebomber performed the role for which it was designed but was never popular with crews. The Merlin I-powered Spectre Mk.I equipped only one RAF squadron before being withdrawn from service in the early 1938.

Shortly after the Spectre's withdrawl, reports on German use of their Stuka in Spain began to be taken seriously by RAF intelligence. Planners mused on whether the Spectre might not be used in training to familiarized RAF fighter pilots with the interception of such divebombers. By the end of 1938, the Spectres had been returned to Supermarine for a refit and modernization. [4] Work proceeded slowly with Supermarine needing to give priority to its Spitfire fighters. Extra urgency came with the declaration of war on Germany.

The events of September 1939 fully vindicated the German Stuka and the RAF switch emphasis on the Spectre rebuild to a fully operational service type. Although only 15 Spectres would be upgraded to full Mk.II standard, the goal was to fill a capability gap and train crews until the RAF's Merlin-Skua divebombers came into service. In the end, the rebuilt Spectres re-entered service in July 1940 - just in time for anti-invasion duty. After the invasion scare receded, the Spectre squadron was stood down and the remaining aircraft transferred to target-tug duties.

[Bottom] Merlin-engined Supermarine Spectre Mk.II in late August 1940 (note 'gas patch' on upper rear fuselage)

__________________________________

[1] Hawker submitted a slightly-strengthened Hart biplane for P.30/32 although this aircraft failed to meet the Specification's top speed requirements.

[2] The wings were strengthened through the use of thicker-gauge metal covering (which also replaced the aft-of-spar wing fabric). The false rear spar was also beefed up.

[3] Supermarine has proposed the name Surefire for the Type 224C but this was rejected.

[4] The most noticable external changes were enlarged rudders and new canopies - a bulged Spitfire-style pilot's hood and moulded rear canopies replacing the earlier 'birdcage' type. Obvious on the ground were the new three-bladed de Havilland variable-speed propellers replacing the fixed-pitch Watts two-bladers.
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Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #1807 on: July 28, 2018, 06:56:22 AM »
Like the 'bou and the Supermarine
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

Offline Brian da Basher

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #1808 on: July 28, 2018, 09:43:12 AM »
Those 224Cs are great and they look like they flew in from Of Things to Come.

Your ideas about Merlin powered Stukas intrigue me and I would like to subscribe to your newsletter.

Oh and my what lovely spats you have there!
 :-* :-* :-* :-* :-*
Brian da Basher
« Last Edit: July 28, 2018, 09:44:55 AM by Brian da Basher »

Offline apophenia

  • Suffered two full days of rapid-fire hallucinations and yet had not a single usuable whif concept in the lot !?!
  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #1809 on: August 01, 2018, 03:16:06 AM »
Over on Secret Projects there's a thread on the Hughes H-1 racer with mention of 1939-1940 proposals for a fighter derivative.

https://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,322.msg332989.html#msg332989

By that time, ownership of the H-1 had been transferred to Timm Aircraft. Initially, Timm proposed redesigning the Hughs airframe for construction in 'non-strategic' wood: "The Timm Aircraft Corp. will build a Howard Hughes pursuit racer from sprucewood impregnated with phenolic resin." My take on a near-completed wooden Timm Pursuit (just prior to filling/sanding panel seams) is shown at top.

According to Jon, "in 1940 a desultory effort was made to modify the aircraft into an all-metal fighter. Nothing came of the project and that was the end of the H-1 as fighter story." I leave it to the viewer to decide whether the bottom sideview is that metal pursuit or just the wooden fighter given a silver finish and a thick coat of polish. ;)
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Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #1810 on: August 01, 2018, 04:16:16 AM »
 :smiley:
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

Offline Old Wombat

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #1811 on: August 01, 2018, 10:48:09 AM »
It's not far removed in shape from the Vought F4U Corsair, is it. :smiley:
"This is the Captain. We have a little problem with our engine sequence, so we may experience some slight turbulence and, ah, explode."

Offline Brian da Basher

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #1812 on: August 01, 2018, 03:36:50 PM »
That's a fantastic idea which you've realized most wonderfully!

The wooden one reminds me of those W.W. I Albatross fighters with wooden fuselages and looking at the metal version makes me imagine it in war-time camouflage.

Excellent work, especially on the wood and metal! The rudder stripes and anti-glare panel are most well done.

Brian da Basher

Offline apophenia

  • Suffered two full days of rapid-fire hallucinations and yet had not a single usuable whif concept in the lot !?!
  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #1813 on: August 02, 2018, 09:06:44 AM »
Thanks folks!

Daryl J. suggested an IAR 80 WHIF featuring a spatted fixed undercarriage, 2-bladed propeller, and an open cockpit with a faired in headrest.
http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=185.0

Sounded like a PZL P.11 update to me! (BTW: Daryl also suggested cloth-covered wings. That I couldn't get behind since metal-skinned monoplane wings were a distinctive feature of PZL's gull-winged fighters.)

Here's my take on Daryl's concept.

(Top) Factory-fresh I.A.R.60 fighter at IAR Brasov, March 1938. This aircraft is armed with two synchronized 13.2 mm FN-Brownings in the fuselage sides and a single 7.9 mm machine gun in each wing.

(Bottom) FARR I.A.R.62 fitted with German light-bomb rack, Ukraine, 1942. The updated I.A.R.62s were I.A.R.61 fighter-bombers rebuilt with some components from the higher-powered I.A.R.80 series.
Under investigation by the Committee of State Sanctioned Modelling, Alternative History and Tractor Carburettor Production for decadent counterrevolutionary behaviour.

Offline Brian da Basher

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Re: Apophenia's Offerings
« Reply #1814 on: August 02, 2018, 05:11:53 PM »
You just know how to set my heart all a-flutter with such incredibly streamlined, spatted landing gear!
 :-* :-* :-*
The IAR-80 is such a natural for this and I'm applauding your limitless imagination for thinking of it and your incredible talent at rendering it so convincingly!
 :-* :-* :-*
Brian da Basher