Author Topic: Erryplanes by perttime  (Read 41659 times)

Offline perttime

  • The man has produced a Finnish Napier Heston Fighter...need we say more?
Re: Erryplanes by perttime
« Reply #30 on: April 27, 2013, 12:11:27 AM »
Later, the Dragon was also used by Finland - in a defensive role over southern parts of the country.


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Re: Erryplanes by perttime
« Reply #31 on: April 27, 2013, 03:40:02 AM »
Wow!!!
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

Offline perttime

  • The man has produced a Finnish Napier Heston Fighter...need we say more?
Re: Erryplanes by perttime
« Reply #32 on: April 27, 2013, 04:01:10 PM »
In the north, Naval action was needed initially to capture the nickel and cobalt resources of the Murmansk area, and later to prevent Soviet naval action through the Barents and Kara seas. Those operations were mainly given to to the Western nations of the area: Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden. The Co-Nordic Fleet included an Air Component where Finnish Seafires had primary responsibility for fighter defence. While the first carrier ship was under construction in Sweden, VL navalised a Spitfire MK 27 batch into Seafire 27 standard. As the nations were new to carrier operations, some experiments on color schemes were carried out, including an all blue, and a black & silver one:

 

Offline perttime

  • The man has produced a Finnish Napier Heston Fighter...need we say more?
Re: Erryplanes by perttime
« Reply #33 on: April 27, 2013, 04:02:09 PM »

Offline perttime

  • The man has produced a Finnish Napier Heston Fighter...need we say more?
Re: Erryplanes by perttime
« Reply #34 on: April 28, 2013, 12:35:47 AM »
A more subdued two-color scheme was finally adopted for Finnish Seafires. The same scheme remained in use on later models - and other types.


Offline perttime

  • The man has produced a Finnish Napier Heston Fighter...need we say more?
Re: Erryplanes by perttime
« Reply #35 on: April 28, 2013, 12:38:49 AM »
Since early 1940, volunteer pilots from USA were flowing to Great Britain to join RAF and Fleet Air Arm in the fight against Nazism. It turned out to be a short fight and everybody was preparing to go home when it became obvious that the end of one fight had become the beginning of another one. Most felt that Stalin's policies were not much better than Hitler's - and decided to stay on.

In 1942 British and US leaders determined that they might as well make it official. American squadrons were formed and their aircraft were given United States Army Air Forces and United States Navy markings.

While US forces in the Pacific area used aircraft made in USA, units on the European side mainly kept using "local" hardware.

... Black Sea, 1946


Offline apophenia

  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: Erryplanes by perttime
« Reply #36 on: April 28, 2013, 10:20:55 AM »
I'm enjoying the Seafires but your avatar Heston Dragon is a stunner!  :)
"Fearlessly the idiot faced the crowd, smiling ...""

Offline perttime

  • The man has produced a Finnish Napier Heston Fighter...need we say more?
Re: Erryplanes by perttime
« Reply #37 on: April 28, 2013, 03:36:30 PM »
I'm enjoying the Seafires but your avatar Heston Dragon is a stunner!  :)
Thanks!
I was a bit worried about touching the "Napier-Heston Racer" because the real-world original is so beautiful - but it turned out better than I expected.
I have a few more developments coming on that theme but - staying with the alternative history chronology - there's a Supermarine prototype next...



Offline perttime

  • The man has produced a Finnish Napier Heston Fighter...need we say more?
Re: Erryplanes by perttime
« Reply #38 on: April 28, 2013, 03:38:39 PM »
Having seen the Ambrosini, Kyushu, Henschel, Curtiss-Wright, and Miles experiments with fighter aircraft in the "pusher canard" configuration, Supermarine decided to build one of their own. There were challenges - but the configuration had its advantages too. A tricycle landing gear was needed and, for emergencies, Supermarine discarded the American idea of jettisoning the propeller to keep the pilot alive on bailing out, and went for Martin-Baker's new explosive-powered ejection system.

Jeffrey Quill first flew Type 402 in September 1947. The aircraft performed as expected. By then, however, the new German turbine engines were well on their way and were clearly the engines of choice for future fighters.

Stripped of engine, guns and instruments, Type 402 ended its days as a target at a gunnery range in Essex, UK.


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Re: Erryplanes by perttime
« Reply #39 on: April 28, 2013, 05:45:59 PM »
Mmmm...
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

Offline apophenia

  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: Erryplanes by perttime
« Reply #40 on: April 29, 2013, 06:23:56 AM »
Oh, your Type 402 will have the Spitfire purists pulling their hair out! Keep up the good work  ;D
"Fearlessly the idiot faced the crowd, smiling ...""

Offline perttime

  • The man has produced a Finnish Napier Heston Fighter...need we say more?
Re: Erryplanes by perttime
« Reply #41 on: April 29, 2013, 04:10:07 PM »
When I posted Type 402 elsewhere, it was noted that it should be quite possible to kitbash it in plastic.
For the picture, most of it came from Seafire 47 tracings. If you want a different engine, a Tempest or Sea Fury can work. The nose could come from an early jet or a DH Hornet. Landing gear might cause some head scratching.

At the moment... I don't have more late '40s or '50s designs. So, keeping things in some sort of chronological order, we'll have a look at what happened to some war time airplanes after they were retired.

Offline perttime

  • The man has produced a Finnish Napier Heston Fighter...need we say more?
Re: Erryplanes by perttime
« Reply #42 on: April 29, 2013, 04:14:47 PM »
Tor Odinsson left the Norwegian Air Force when they stopped flying propeller fighters. He preferred the sound and feel of piston engines. As he left, he purchased his trusty Heston Basilisk, and a few extra Napier Sabre engines just in case.

You can tell that he enjoyed his airplane but by mid 1980s he started feeling that it could be even better. Being a firm believer in lots of cubic centimeters, he started looking for a bigger engine but nothing seemed quite suitable. One day it occurred to him that there was quite a lot of space between the engine and his legs. It wasn't empty space but a few quick measurements confirmed that there was - barely - enough to bolt a second crank case onto the engine.

A period of furious wrenching ensued, interspersed by shopping for new propellers and other parts. The space that the second crank case filled had previously mainly been occupied by the main fuel tank. The reduced range did not bother Tor much. This wasn't, after all, his long range travelling vehicle. It is just perfect for his Thorsday joy rides and the occasional air race.


Offline apophenia

  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: Erryplanes by perttime
« Reply #43 on: April 30, 2013, 12:51:52 PM »
Why? Because the Napier Sabre just wasn't complicated enough!  ;D

On the Type 402, a Supermarine Attacker nose and canopy would keep it in the family. For landing gear, maybe a P-39 nose gear?
"Fearlessly the idiot faced the crowd, smiling ...""

Offline perttime

  • The man has produced a Finnish Napier Heston Fighter...need we say more?
Re: Erryplanes by perttime
« Reply #44 on: April 30, 2013, 05:03:01 PM »
 ???  More is better. Right?   :P
(That may be in character for Tor Odinsson, at least... )

I think Type 402 needs a tall landing gear, to keep the props from hitting the ground when landing.