Author Topic: Logan's Profiles - SdKfz 231 Halbkettenfahrzeug  (Read 230496 times)

Offline Diamondback

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Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
« Reply #600 on: April 24, 2014, 02:27:11 PM »
For some reason, I wondered if Capt. Shomo was going to show up... :) he's one of the Mustang aces I wish were better known, because of the fact that while he wasn't a top scorer he did his thing while nominally flying RECON missions.


Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
« Reply #601 on: April 24, 2014, 10:57:01 PM »
Thanks lauhof and Diamondback!  Shomo's story really is amazing.  There are two things I love about it.  First is that he and his wingman were supposed to meet up with a Mustang squadron for the recon flight over the enemy airbase, but their escorts never showed up so they decided to just complete the mission unescorted.  Turns out they didn't need it!  The second thing that I love is that in most of these stories from WWII are tempered by later evidence that the enemy only lost four aircraft total, for example.  In this case, though, Shomo and his wingman flew over all the crash sites and took photos of all their kills.  That's one way to confirm them!

I've loved the story of his incredible story since having first read about it in this book as a kid.



Cheers,

Logan

Offline Matt Wiser

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Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
« Reply #602 on: April 25, 2014, 09:12:06 AM »
In all fairness to the people who claimed x number of kills on a particular mission, they were made in good faith, and medals often were awarded based on the best intelligence information available at the time. The same went for the USN submarine force: skippers claimed sinkings and were duly awarded medals for those patrols, but postwar accounting either cut the number of sinkings, the tonnage amount, or both. Even when skippers presented photographic evidence of ships sinking when the postwar accounting was wiping the claim, their claims were not recognized. But conversely, skippers who were only credited with "damage" to a ship during the war were surprised at the end of the war to find that the ship they had "damaged" had in fact gone down!

Sorry for the above-but it had to be pointed out. Nice artwork, and you can bet that in OLYMPIC, he would've had the opportunity to add to his score..
Treat everyone you meet with kindness and respect. But always have a plan ready to kill them.

Old USMC Adage.

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
« Reply #603 on: April 25, 2014, 10:23:31 AM »
I don't disagree, Matt!  I don't blame pilots for overclaiming.  It happened with all countries, all service, and it has throughout history.  I remember one Soviet apologist on a forum recently who was investigating USAF claims in the Korean War and their excessive kill ratio.  His research quickly showed that the USAF pilots were indeed overclaiming.  Unfortunately, as he dug further, he discovered that his heroes, the expert Soviet pilots of the 64th Fighter Corps, were just as guilty of this as the American pilots he was looking to expose.  In short, everyone did it, and it wasn't intentional.  It's just human nature.

I also agree that commendations or official claims shouldn't retroactively be changed as research sheds new light on actual losses.  One of my favorite subjects to read about are cases where a pilot or submarine captain sunk a major vessel without even realizing it.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Volkodav

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Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
« Reply #604 on: April 25, 2014, 10:32:57 AM »
I don't disagree, Matt!  I don't blame pilots for overclaiming.  It happened with all countries, all service, and it has throughout history.  I remember one Soviet apologist on a forum recently who was investigating USAF claims in the Korean War and their excessive kill ratio.  His research quickly showed that the USAF pilots were indeed overclaiming.  Unfortunately, as he dug further, he discovered that his heroes, the expert Soviet pilots of the 64th Fighter Corps, were just as guilty of this as the American pilots he was looking to expose.  In short, everyone did it, and it wasn't intentional.  It's just human nature.

I also agree that commendations or official claims shouldn't retroactively be changed as research sheds new light on actual losses.  One of my favorite subjects to read about are cases where a pilot or submarine captain sunk a major vessel without even realizing it.

Cheers,

Logan

I remember reading something on the Shinano sinking where the captain claimed a carrier and they gave him a freighter as no such carrier existed.

Offline Matt Wiser

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Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
« Reply #605 on: April 25, 2014, 12:59:34 PM »
The best way to prevent overclaiming: a gun camera in every bird. Nowadays that's a given, but in those days? Not very likely. And there's been rumors that one guy who had the opportunity to become an ace in two wars passed it up. Robin Olds had four MiG kills in his SEA tour, and almost had #5 if not for the wretched AIM-4 Falcon missile. Once Sidewinders were refitted to his F-4s, he had ten chances to get his fifth MiG, but he'd been told that once he did that, the Secretary of the Air Force, Harold Brown (Carter's SECDEF) would pull him from combat as a publicity asset. It's rumored he did kill his fifth MiG, but either didn't claim it, or let his wingman take credit.
Treat everyone you meet with kindness and respect. But always have a plan ready to kill them.

Old USMC Adage.

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
« Reply #606 on: April 25, 2014, 01:08:10 PM »
German pilots in Spain reportedly did the same thing.  They didn't claim kills in order to not get pulled from the theatre.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Old Wombat

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Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
« Reply #607 on: April 25, 2014, 04:03:52 PM »
I remember one story about the Luftwaffe, where one of their senior generals wryly pointed out that in (iirc) a single week his pilots claimed to have wiped out the RAF twice over with the number of kills claimed.

Also, kills could be rejected (post-war) on the basis that a plane made it back to base, even if that plane was unable to be restored to service.
"This is the Captain. We have a little problem with our engine sequence, so we may experience some slight turbulence and, ah, explode."

Offline arc3371

  • Takes no responsibility should anyone try to turn the drawings into plastic...but we will still hold him accountable for the madness that ensues!!!
Re: Logan's Profiles - USAAF F-15A - Shomo's Flying Undertaker
« Reply #608 on: April 25, 2014, 06:52:10 PM »
A lot of great planes Logan

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Bulgarian Heinkel He 46G Sova
« Reply #609 on: April 26, 2014, 06:39:59 AM »
Thanks, arc!  Here's one that I like because it's quite plausible, and it's just pretty.  In fact, it's often misreported that the Bulgarian Air Force operated He 46s (on Wikipedia, for example), but they didn't--just He 45s and 51s.  I've also submitted this to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB.



In the mid-1930s, Tsar Boris III of Bulgaria initiated a rearmament policy which virtually ignored the restrictions of the Neuilly Treaty. On 28 July 1935, the war minister officially created the new Bulgarian Air Force (Vâzdushni Voyski).

In 1936 Hitler supplied the new air arm with 12 Heinkel He 51B fighters and 18 He 46 reconnaissance aircraft. These aircraft were the personal gift of Reichmarschall Hermann Göring to Boris III and were delivered in late 1936. The He 46 was nicknamed "Sova" (Owl) and was used by the Troop Yato (Squadron) of the 3. Army Orliak (Group) and the Recce Yato of the Training Orliak for the reconnaissance role. They served with the 2nd Army Orliak until 1942 and operated with the fuselage codes of 11, 22 and 33.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Bulgarian Heinkel He 46G Sova
« Reply #610 on: April 26, 2014, 06:44:29 AM »
That is nice! :)
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

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Offline apophenia

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Bulgarian Heinkel He 46G Sova
« Reply #611 on: April 28, 2014, 10:59:06 AM »
It is. I love those pre-war Bulgarian markings! Nice work, Logan  :)
"And loot some for the old folks, Can't loot for themselves"

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Bulgarian Heinkel He 46G Sova
« Reply #612 on: April 29, 2014, 03:07:47 AM »
Thanks, guys!

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought SB4U Viking - USS Wasp
« Reply #613 on: May 07, 2014, 01:17:41 AM »
As per usual with the Vikings, note that this is reduced to 33%. Click on the profile to see it on Photobucket where you can click again and see it at 100%. I've also submitted this to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies etc GB.



Rising sun ‘victory flags' were exceptional on SB4Us at any time. Erroneous profiles published in the past 30 years display 'meatballs' on some scout-bombers, especially the Scouting Two aircraft of Lt. (jg) Leppla and Radioman Liska. However, the USS Wasp’s two SB4U squadrons flaunted their success over Japanese aircraft at the start of the Guadalcanal campaign. Wasp's Vikings stole a march on the carrier's two fighter squadrons, with seven actual shootdowns before the F4Fs notched their first. VS-71's Lt. (jg) R L Howard shot down a Rabaul-based A6M2 fighter over Tulagi on 8 August 1942 at the start of the Guadalcanal campaign.



On 25 August, SB4U-4 BuNo 03315 was flown by two pilots to shoot down three Japanese aircraft. During the morning search at 0657 about 150 miles northwest of the force, VS-71's Lt. (jg) Chester V. Zalewski noticed a twin-float seaplane cruising at 1,500 feet. It fled towards some clouds, but Zalewski's below-rear attack swiftly flamed it. One crewman jumped from the burning plane, but never opened his chute. "Feeling pretty good over his achievement," as Zalewski later wrote, he resumed his search. At 0825, only 30 miles from home plate, he spotted a similar seaplane approaching about 500 feet above. This time he torched the enemy plane before the crew could react, and again a hapless Japanese jumped before his flaming aircraft crashed into the sea. The sharpshooting Zalewski destroyed two Type 0 reconnaissance seaplanes commanded by WO Nakamura Saburō and WO Adachi Hisaji from heavy cruiser Atago (Kondō's flagship). Lt. Roy E. Breen, Jr. (USNA 1939), of VS-72, shot up a third enemy seaplane, another Type 0 from the Myōkō, only 30 miles from TF-18. The Japanese got away, but only after Breen expended all his bullets.



Other than raising havoc with Kondō's morning search, the Wasp's SB4Us sighted no ships, because the Japanese drew northward out of range. From the AirSoPac morning search reports, Rear Admiral Noyes learned of more ships too distant to attack. More accessible targets appeared to westward. At 1007 Lt. James J. Murphy in 23-P-1 sighted Tanaka's battered invasion convoy, with the Kinryū Maru being abandoned. A little later, CACTUS announced Mangrum's attack. Hoping his forces would renew battle that morning, an impatient Nimitz sent the following to Ghormley and Fletcher: "Realize situation still critical but exchange of damage to date seems to be in our favor...Let's finish off those carriers." Fortunately the Japanese had withdrawn out of reach of the outmatched Wasp.



Noyes turned northwest, and at 1326 the Wasp dispatched Lieutenant Commander Beakley with twenty-four SB4Us and ten TBFs on a search/attack mission against the convoy. Among these aircraft was SB4U-4 BuNo 03315 that Zalewski had piloted that morning. While they took off a 14th Air Group Kawanishi Type 2 flying boat (Spec. Duty Ens. Itō Tatsuhisa) snooped TF-18 and at 1345 reported one carrier, two cruisers, and six destroyers ("whether enemy's or ours unknown") bearing 110 degrees and 514 miles from Shortland. Easing into position several miles to abeam as the Wasp planes climbed to 12,000 feet, Itō shadowed the strike group as it headed west toward his base. After about 40 minutes, the big Type 2 flying boat had foolishly closed within 3,000 yards of the nearest Wasp planes, which had finally noticed it. VS-71's 2nd Division of Lt. Morris R. Doughty, Ens. Howard N. Murphy, Lt. (jg) Charles H. Mester, and Ens. Robert A. Escher climbed above the target and rolled into a rear attack. The Japanese gunners could not prevent Doughty from igniting the right inboard engine. In deep trouble, Itō reefed the Kawanishi into a chandelle, but the other three SB4Us quickly charged in from the rear. At 9,000 feet the Type 2 shed its wings in a fiery explosion. VS-71 scored a remarkable victory against a tough, swift target.

Three documented victory flags on one Navy SB4U undoubtedly stood as a record. Since 8 August the two Wasp scouting squadrons, 71 and 72, shot down seven enemy aircraft, while a frustrated VF-71 had yet to even see an enemy plane aloft. All of these claims are substantiated by Japanese records, and Wasp's fighter pilots insisted that the SB4U pilots 'tend to their own business'!

Cheers,

Logan

Offline lauhof52

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Vought SB4U Viking - USS Wasp
« Reply #614 on: May 07, 2014, 01:26:44 PM »
Thanks Logan for the nice story and the beautiful SB4U! As Always a big fan of the viking :) :)

regards
Lauhof

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
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Re: Logan's Profiles - USMC F-14A TARPS - VMFP-3 "Eyes of the Corps"
« Reply #615 on: May 08, 2014, 04:14:46 AM »
Thanks, Lauhof!  I thought you'd like this one.  This is the first mid-1942 scheme with the canopy closed up.  I thought it looked appropriate given the aircraft's air-to-air kills. The backstory is an adaptation from John P. Lundstrom's fantastic book "The First Team and the Guadalcanal Campaign". I mostly just replaced "SBD" and "Dauntless" with "SB4U" and "Viking", then added context to the beginning and end of the account.

As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page. I've also submitted this to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies etc GB.



The United States Marine Corps was initially interested in the F-14 as an F-4 Phantom II replacement; going so far as to send officers to Fighter Squadron One Twenty-Four (VF-124) to train as instructors. The Corps' enthusiasm for the F-14 cooled, however, when development of the stores management system for ground attack munitions was not pursued. With the development of the TARPS camera pod, the Marines Corps once again looked at procuring the F-14, this time as a replacement for the aging RF-4B Phantom IIs serving with Marine Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron 3 (VMFP-3).

VMFP-3, the "Eyes of the Corps", began slowly converting to the F-14A Vagabond in 1981, but they retained a flight of RF-4Bs for operation from the USS Midway (CV-41) until 1984 when the remainder of the unit converted. Since the RF-4Bs were completely unarmed, ground attack capability was not an issue. In fact, the F-14's considerable air-to-air armament meant that it required no escort, a great improvement over the RF-4B. The F-14s were initially operated in a high visibility scheme to match the RF-4Bs, but quickly switched to a low visibility overall gray with subdued national markings.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline arc3371

  • Takes no responsibility should anyone try to turn the drawings into plastic...but we will still hold him accountable for the madness that ensues!!!
Re: Logan's Profiles - USMC F-14A TARPS - VMFP-3 "Eyes of the Corps"
« Reply #616 on: May 08, 2014, 06:32:28 AM »
I like that

Offline Matt Wiser

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Re: Logan's Profiles - USMC F-14A TARPS - VMFP-3 "Eyes of the Corps"
« Reply #617 on: May 08, 2014, 09:44:15 AM »
Good one! IRL the first two squadrons the Marines tapped for F-14s were VMFA-122 and VMFA-531. Both squadrons had people going through ground school at Miramar when the Commandant of the Corps canceled the Marine Tomcat program. They say it's a wonder the Miramar Officers' Club was still standing afterwards...
Treat everyone you meet with kindness and respect. But always have a plan ready to kill them.

Old USMC Adage.

Offline lauhof52

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Re: Logan's Profiles - USMC F-14A TARPS - VMFP-3 "Eyes of the Corps"
« Reply #618 on: May 11, 2014, 01:32:36 AM »
 :) :)

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Photo-reconnaissance Heinkel He 100D-4/F3, Sicily
« Reply #619 on: May 12, 2014, 11:40:30 PM »
Thanks, guys!  Matt, we're still considering doing some for those units, but we'll see.

As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page.  I've also submitted this to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB.



This profile depicts a Heinkel He 100D-4/F3 of 1. Staffel (F)/Aufkl.Gr.122 (Long range Reconnaissance Group) at Catania, Sicily, during the summer of 1942. It carries the Staffel emblem of a stylized white stork flying across a red and white symbol representing the field of view of a camera. The fairing for the Rb type aerial camera is clearly visible beneath the lower fuselage.

On 3 June, 1942, 1(F)./122 flew several He 100 recce sorties over Malta. Two He 100s were sent on separate sorties to Malta. One aircraft was to check and photograph the airfields while the other was to check for shipping in both Valetta and Marsaxlokk harbors – neither aircraft was intercepted. At the time, 1(F)./122 was under the control of Luftflotte 2 in the Mediterranean with a mixed stock of Ju 88 and He 100 aircraft – 12 on strength of which 5 were servicable.



Many of you will notice the tanks and camera fairing that Talos drew up and I added to this profile.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline lauhof52

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Photo-reconnaissance Heinkel He 100D-4/F3, Sicily
« Reply #620 on: May 13, 2014, 03:13:36 PM »
This one is really very nice. So real! :) :)

regards
Lauhof

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF B-51G Night Intruder - Vietnam
« Reply #621 on: May 14, 2014, 07:09:49 AM »
Thanks, lauhof!

As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page. I've also submitted this profile to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB where you can see the profile's progression, as well.



The B-51G was the designation assigned to sixteen B-51Bs that were modified as night intruders for use in Vietnam under a project known as Tropic Moon. Late in 1967, three of the 3rd Bombardment Group's B-51Bs were experimentally fitted with a pod-mounted low light level television system. Operational trials with this equipment took place in Southeast Asia between December 1967 and August 1968, mostly over the Ho Chi Minh Trail. The results of the trials were sufficiently encouraging that the USAF awarded a contract to Martin and Westinghouse to modify 16 B-51Bs as night intruders under the designation B-51G.

Early in 1969, the Westinghouse sensor system was installed in a new nose section designed by Martin. The new nose contained a low light level television camera plus a forward-looking infrared (FLIR) set and a laser guidance system. This new equipment was operated by a specialist sitting in the rear cockpit. The relevant information was fed by the system operator into the pilot's cockpit so that he could select the appropriate combination of weapons to attack the target. The laser guidance system now made it possible to carry four 500-lb "smart bombs" on the exterior of the rotating bomb bay door. The modified aircraft were redesignated B-51G, and they were easily recognizable by their bulbous "chins" that contained the low light level television equipment.

The first B-51G was taken on charge by a reactivated 13th Bomb Squadron at MacDill AFB in Florida in July of 1969. The 13th Bomb Squadron deployed to Ubon in Thailand with eleven B-51Gs in September of 1970. When it arrived there, it became part of the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing. Four B-51Gs remained at MacDill AFB for conversion training with the 4424th Combat Crew Training Squadron. They went into action over the Ho Chi Minh Trail. They used laser-guided smart bombs, often achieving an accuracy of 15 feet.

Only one B-51G was lost in Southeast Asia, in a tragic midair collision at night with an O-2 Skymaster FAC over southern Laos on 12 December, 1970. Flying B-51G 53-3931 was squadron CO Lt Col Paul Pitt and WSO Lt Col Ed Buschette, who was the 13th BS's chief sensor operator. The men believed that they had been hit by anti-aircraft fire, and flying conclusion. Ejecting near Ban Vangthon, the pair spent a terrifying night on the ground within earshot of enemy troops, before being airlifted out the following day from separate hiding places.

In the event, Nail FAC O-2A 67-21428 of the 504th Tactical Air Support Group, flown by 1Lt Thomas Allen Duckett with observer Maj Owen George Skinner, failed to return to its base at Nakhon Phanom that night. The following day the mostly intact wreckage of the O-2 was found on the ground. It was reported that emergency radio contact was made with someone in the area, but neither man was ever found. It is possible that their survival radios were taken by the enemy in an attempt to 'sucker' rescue forces into the area. Both men remain listed as missing.



And here's a closeup of the new nose that I made for the B-51G variant.  It has the radar and LLTV, along with lots of little antennae on the top and bottom of the fuselage.  You can see 13th Squadron's mascot, Oscar, on the nose.  Yes, apparently the Grim Reaper's name is Oscar.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline ChernayaAkula

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Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF B-51G Night Intruder - Vietnam
« Reply #622 on: May 14, 2014, 07:37:47 AM »
 :-* My, that's purrty!
Cheers,
Moritz

"The appropriate response to reality is to go insane!"

Offline arc3371

  • Takes no responsibility should anyone try to turn the drawings into plastic...but we will still hold him accountable for the madness that ensues!!!
Re: Logan's Profiles - USAF B-51G Night Intruder - Vietnam
« Reply #623 on: May 14, 2014, 07:54:51 AM »

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Bolivian Heinkel He 46G
« Reply #624 on: May 15, 2014, 01:04:18 AM »
Thanks, guys! And here we have another colorful and plausible Heinkel He 46G from a user I've never depicted before, the Bolivian Air Corps. I've also submitted this to The Snoops, Sensors, Spooks, & Spies GB.



After the Chaco War, the air arms of both Bolivia and Paraguay were practically exhausted, not to mention the down-trodden and long-suffering ground forces. Their air arms had suffered considerably during the war and losses had been tremendous. However, although financially strapped, both nations almost immediately set about rearming should hostilities once again break out. It should be recalled that, although an Armistice had been agreed upon in 1935, an actual settlement of the war and a peace treaty were not signed until 1939.

Bolivia felt very strongly that she had "won" the war in the air, and that her forces need only be strengthened along certain very particular lines. Before the ink on the armistice agreement was even dry, circa October 1935, German sources had offered Bolivia terms on a number of Heinkel He 46 single-engined reconnaissance monoplanes.

These aircraft were delivered in overall silver dope, but some were painted with a tortoise shell green and brown scheme on their upper surfaces much like that applied to the Bolivian Ju 52/3m "Huanuni" that saw service during the Chaco War.

Cheers,

Logan