Author Topic: Logan's Profiles - SdKfz 231 Halbkettenfahrzeug  (Read 249024 times)

Offline Matt Wiser

  • Newly Joined - Welcome me!
Re: Logan's Profiles - Talespin - Baloo's Sea Duck
« Reply #700 on: February 17, 2015, 08:57:43 AM »
Interesting change of pace....never did see the show (I was already in college), but still, seeing designs from movies or TV is always good.
Treat everyone you meet with kindness and respect. But always have a plan ready to kill them.

Old USMC Adage.

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
  • Rivet-counting whiffer
Re: Logan's Profiles - Pan Am Conwing L-16 Sea Duck
« Reply #701 on: February 18, 2015, 04:33:31 AM »
Thanks Taiidan & Matt! I'm glad you both liked it!

As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page. I've also submitted this to the Floaty/Ship/Naval GB.



Procured as a replacement for Pan Am's Sikorsky S-38, the Conwing L-16 served in the airmail, feeder, and route pioneering roles as its predecessor. While it would never achieve the fame of its bigger, clipper cousins, the L-16 was a reliable, popular aircraft in Pan Am service.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline lauhof52

  • Dutchie
  • The Decimator Guy!
Re: Logan's Profiles - Pan Am Conwing L-16 Sea Duck
« Reply #702 on: February 18, 2015, 04:13:37 PM »
Excellent work Logan!! 8)

Re: Logan's Profiles - Pan Am Conwing L-16 Sea Duck
« Reply #703 on: February 18, 2015, 06:27:38 PM »
Seems so real...  :)
... and kill me again
or take me as I am,
for I shall not change...
never...

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
  • Rivet-counting whiffer
Re: Logan's Profiles - USN Captured A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #704 on: February 19, 2015, 03:55:11 AM »
As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page. I've also submitted this to the Floaty/Ship/Naval GB.



This particular profile is based on a report that I've read of a captured A6M2-N Rufe that was evaluated by the USN at NAS Anacostia. I've not seen any pictures of it and don't even know if any exist. It was apparently assigned the TAICS number of 3, 4, or 5, and is reported to have to have influenced the development of the Wildcatfish. Since I had no details about what such a captured Rufe may have looked like, I took my inspiration from the famous TAICS 1, A6M2 Zero that was captured in Alaska and flown against various US aircraft types and the Wildcatfish which was painted in a very similar scheme.



Since details are so scarce on the actual aircraft this one is based on, I won't bother to assemble much of a backstory on it. It's likely to have been captured at Tulagi or the Aleutians. I think the Vought F4U Corsair may been the better basis for a US attempt at a similar floatplane fighter than the Grumman F4F Wildcat.



Cheers,

Logan

Offline arc3371

  • Takes no responsibility should anyone try to turn the drawings into plastic...but we will still hold him accountable for the madness that ensues!!!
Re: Logan's Profiles - USN Captured A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #705 on: February 19, 2015, 09:53:37 AM »
A very goodlooking floatplane

Offline Matt Wiser

  • Newly Joined - Welcome me!
Re: Logan's Profiles - USN Captured A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #706 on: February 19, 2015, 10:22:28 AM »
Nice work! Any more Vagabonds in the pipeline?
Treat everyone you meet with kindness and respect. But always have a plan ready to kill them.

Old USMC Adage.

Offline perttime

  • The man has produced a Finnish Napier Heston Fighter...need we say more?
Re: Logan's Profiles - USN Captured A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #707 on: February 19, 2015, 03:30:50 PM »
Hmmm.... did the British navy capture any?
:)

Offline Tophe

  • He sees things in double...
  • twin-boom & asymmetric fan
    • my models
Re: Logan's Profiles - USN Captured A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #708 on: February 20, 2015, 12:30:05 AM »
Your new one is also very harmonious, thanks for the enjoyment!

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
  • Rivet-counting whiffer
Re: Logan's Profiles - USN Captured A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #709 on: February 20, 2015, 02:12:12 AM »
Thanks, guys! You'll get more Vagabonds eventually, Matt! I've had one half-finished for months now. Perttime, the Brits will end up with one at the end of the war, at least, but I don't know if they will earlier in the war or not...

I'm glad you like the twin boom Sea Duck, Tophe!

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
  • Rivet-counting whiffer
Re: Logan's Profiles - Persian V-507 Vagabond - Iran-Iraq War
« Reply #710 on: February 21, 2015, 07:44:54 AM »
As promised, here's a fully armed one from the Iran-Iraq War.  As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page.



With the change of the regime in Iran, in February-April 1979, and worsening of relations to the USA, it was expected that Iran would not be able to operate its V-507s any more. Such expectations were reinforced by rumors about the US personnel sabotaging aircraft before it was forced to leave the country. By September 1980, however, the Iranian Air Force - re-named into "Islamic Republic of Iran Air Force" (IRIAF) - managed to make an increasing number of airframes operational, despite immense problems due to repeated purges of its officers, some of which were executed, others imprisoned, forced into exile or early retirement. The IRIAF survived these times and its Tomcats were to become involved in the bloody war against Iraq even before this officially began, scoring their first kill already on 9 September 1980.

Within the first six months of the war Iranian F-14s scored over 50 air-to-air victories, mainly against Iraqi MiG-21s and MiG-23s, but some also against Su-20/22s. In exchange, only a single F-14A was damaged - by debris from a MiG-21 that exploded in front of it. The war between Iraq and Iran subsequently turned into a war of attrition, with lengthy breaks - used by both sides for reorganization and resupply of their military power - between short periods of extremely bitter and bloody fighting. Eventually, by the spring of 1982 the Iranians managed to throw Iraqi troops back to the international border.

This particular V-507 shot down two Iraqi MiG-23MSs with a single AIM-54A missile on 21 July 1982 in an engagement fought halfway between Baghdad and the Iranian border after its crew ignored orders not to enter Iraqi airspace. The jet was subsequently used to destroy at least five other Iraqi fighters during the course of the war.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Matt Wiser

  • Newly Joined - Welcome me!
Re: Logan's Profiles - Persian V-507 Vagabond - Iran-Iraq War
« Reply #711 on: February 21, 2015, 12:00:46 PM »
Good work, Logan! Is the warload right: Four AIM-9J, two AIM-54, four AIM-7E-2?
Treat everyone you meet with kindness and respect. But always have a plan ready to kill them.

Old USMC Adage.

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
  • Rivet-counting whiffer
Re: Logan's Profiles - Persian V-507 Vagabond - Iran-Iraq War
« Reply #712 on: February 21, 2015, 12:29:10 PM »
Thanks! That's almost right, Matt. The real Iranian F-14A Tomcats only carried AIM-9Ps and older since they never bought AIM-9Ls. In this case, though, I think Iran would've saved some money going with the V-507 instead of the Tomcat and it would need the AIM-9Ls since it didn't have the agility of the Tomcats, so I left it with the AIM-9Ls.

Now, as we both know, a real Tomcat couldn't actually carry this loadout. They'd be left with two fewer AIM-9s and that's with the external pylons.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Matt Wiser

  • Newly Joined - Welcome me!
Re: Logan's Profiles - Persian V-507 Vagabond - Iran-Iraq War
« Reply #713 on: February 21, 2015, 01:47:14 PM »
Actually, Iran did buy AIM-9L (for their F-16s, which were never delivered because Khomeni canceled the order), and the Ls were also never delivered. If you read the book Iran-Iraq War in the Air, or have a look at the Iranian Tomcat threads over on ACIG.org, there's mention of some AIM-9Ls making it to Iran in the 1980s. But never confirmed.....
Treat everyone you meet with kindness and respect. But always have a plan ready to kill them.

Old USMC Adage.

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
  • Rivet-counting whiffer
Re: Logan's Profiles - Persian V-507 Vagabond - Iran-Iraq War
« Reply #714 on: February 21, 2015, 01:54:03 PM »
Interesting. I read that they didn't buy them for the F-14s for the same reason they didn't bother getting AIM-7Fs even though they were cleared for them. The AIM-54 was always intended to be the primary weapon for their F-14s and the other missiles were secondary.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Matt Wiser

  • Newly Joined - Welcome me!
Re: Logan's Profiles - Persian V-507 Vagabond - Iran-Iraq War
« Reply #715 on: February 21, 2015, 02:35:29 PM »
AIM-7E-2 was specifically designed for the F-14. While the AIM-54 was going to be the primary BVR weapon, the IIAF knew that things would get up close and personal eventually.
Treat everyone you meet with kindness and respect. But always have a plan ready to kill them.

Old USMC Adage.

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
  • Rivet-counting whiffer
Re: Logan's Profiles - F-15A Reporter - "Lindbergh's Own"
« Reply #716 on: February 22, 2015, 11:50:44 AM »
Thanks, everyone! Glanini, that means a lot coming from you! I love your work!

As always, click on the image below to see the picture at 100% or view it at my DeviantArt page.



Commanding Officer of the 110th TRS, Maj. Noland was leading his unit in the P-51K on 14 August 1945 when a number of Japanese fighters were intercepted over the Home Islands. Six enemy aircraft were claimed to have been destroyed, with three of these being credited to Noland—later assessments revised the major’s score to two kills and a probable. This action was almost certainly the last action to see victories credited to a reconnaissance unit in World War II.



This profile was actually inspired by the 3rd BG's Olive Drab A-26 Invaders. I wanted to see what a plain, olive drab Reporter would look like and began looking for a candidate unit. The 110th TRS operated P-39s and P-40s in a similar olive drab scheme before getting their F-6Ks (P-51Ks), so they seemed like a good fit. The 110th is actually the unit that my dad served in the whole time I was growing up. It was called "Lindbergh's Own" because Charles Lindbergh had been a member of the 110th and held the rank of captain when he made his historic 1927 Trans-Atlantic solo flight.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Acree

  • That will teach you to frustrate the powers that be...won't it comrade?
  • Sentenced to time in the BTS Gulag...
Re: Logan's Profiles - F-15A Reporter - "Lindbergh's Own"
« Reply #717 on: February 22, 2015, 12:48:00 PM »
Outstanding, Logan!  I always loved the P-61 in all its variants' and this is no exception.  Looks good in OD&Gray

Offline lauhof52

  • Dutchie
  • The Decimator Guy!
Re: Logan's Profiles - F-15A Reporter - "Lindbergh's Own"
« Reply #718 on: February 22, 2015, 03:51:02 PM »
Outstanding indeed!! 8)

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
  • Rivet-counting whiffer
Re: Logan's Profiles - F-15A Reporter - "Lindbergh's Own"
« Reply #719 on: February 27, 2015, 11:25:49 PM »
Thanks, guys!

Cheers,

Logan

Offline arc3371

  • Takes no responsibility should anyone try to turn the drawings into plastic...but we will still hold him accountable for the madness that ensues!!!
Re: Logan's Profiles - F-15A Reporter - "Lindbergh's Own"
« Reply #720 on: February 28, 2015, 02:59:03 AM »
Excellent work as always

Offline apophenia

  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: Logan's Profiles - F-15A Reporter - "Lindbergh's Own"
« Reply #721 on: February 28, 2015, 12:50:57 PM »
Yes, very nice! OD suits the F-15A to a tee  :)
"Auferstanden aus Ruinen, Glück für Menschen und Maschinen"

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
  • Rivet-counting whiffer
Re: Logan's Profiles - Flying Tigers A-19A Stuka
« Reply #722 on: March 13, 2015, 04:05:57 AM »
As per usual with the Vikings, note that this is reduced to 33%. Click on the profile to see it on Photobucket where you can click again and see it at 100%.



When the creation of the "Special Air Unit" for China was authorized, the eventual plan was for there to be three air groups comprised of American volunteers.  These were to be the 1st American Volunteer Group--a fighter unit equipped with the Curtiss P-40s,the 2nd AVG--a bomber group comprised of various bomber types, and the 3rd AVG--also a fighter unit.  Only the 1st AVG would arrive in China before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor saw the plans for the other two groups canceled.  Elements of the 2nd AVG were en route to China when the program was aborted and many of its personnel and resources were diverted to Australia.  A portion of the 2nd AVG's ground crew and aircraft and a single pilot were already in the Far East, however, and many would be folded into the 1st AVG to bolster its strength.  The 2nd AVG was to consist of three squadrons of 33 bombers each, one of Douglas DB-7s (A-20s), one of Lockheed A-29 Hudsons, and the last of Vought A-19 Vikings.  As it was, only the A-19s would reach Burma, the other two types being taken on strength by the USAAF.



At first, the 33 crated export-standard Vought V-187 Vikings purchased by CAMCO remained at Rangoon until the AVG could figure out what to do with them since the 2nd AVG pilots were no longer coming.  Soon, though, the losses of P-40s suffered by the 1st AVG saw the decision made to use the Vikings to flesh out the three squadrons of the AVG.  Pilots would fly the type of aircraft dictated by the missions assigned to the unit.  Since the P-40s lacked any real ground attack capability, these missions were obviously given to the A-19 Vikings.  Many pilots had little trouble with the transition, often flying a P-40 one day and an A-19 the next.  In fact, this was easier than it might otherwise seem as quite a large number of the 1st AVG's pilots came from the US Navy and US Marine Corps.  Many of these naval aviators had experience flying dive bombers, often on the SB4U Viking, specifically, the naval variant of the very plane operated by the AVG.



Not everything went smoothly, however.  Since these Vought V-187s were, like the Curtiss H81s, produced for export, they lacked some of the more advanced features of US aircraft.  They lacked bomb displacement gear, the reflector dive bombing sight, radios, and the later wing racks.  In fact, the AVG didn't even have reliable US bombs to arm the aircraft.  They had to use old Soviet 250 kg bombs from Chinese stocks.  These weren't the best, but they were far more reliable than the Chinese-manufactured bombs and WWI-era bombs that were being offered as alternatives.  Among the pilots with dive bombing experience were Tex Hill, Ed Rector, Tom Jones, Frank Lawlor, Lewis Bishop, Link Laughlin, Frank Schiel, and Bob Little.



This particular aircraft was flown by Lewis Bishop and can be seen with the ochre-colored Soviet bomb underneath it.  In most cases, the rear gunner was Chinese.  It is one of the aircraft assigned to 3rd Squadron "Hell's Angels" and can be seen with its own marking that tied in with the squadron, but had a unique element, as well.  Unlike the female red angels on the rest of 3rd Squadron's planes, this aircraft had artwork of a demon roaming the land, dispensing lightning and bombs to the hapless people of the world.  It was also given the distinctive shark mouth seen on P-40s, though it didn't look quite the same on these new Vikings.



http://www.oncamouflagedwings.org/aid/hudson/mystery.htm

This profile is based on the actual Lockheed Hudson's used by China and about which relatively little is known. It was the image above and the mysterious "devil" is what I found most intriguing. It's very reminiscent of the Hell's Angels used by the AVG, but the Hudson's weren't actually known to be used by the AVG. I tried to recreate that "devil" on the A-19, but styled a little more closely after the Hell's Angels. I think it turned out alright, personally. It took a lot of work to get the shark mouth looking how I wanted it to, as well.



Cheers,

Logan

Offline taiidantomcat

  • Plastic Origamist...and not too shabby with the painting either!
  • Full Member
  • Stylishly late...because he was reading comics
Re: Logan's Profiles - Flying Tigers A-19A Stuka
« Reply #723 on: March 13, 2015, 08:11:13 AM »
That really fits  :-*
"They know you can do anything, So the question is, what don't you do?"

-David Fincher

Offline lauhof52

  • Dutchie
  • The Decimator Guy!
Re: Logan's Profiles - Flying Tigers A-19A Stuka
« Reply #724 on: March 13, 2015, 06:01:34 PM »
Great Logan! Always love to see you back on track with the vikings! 8)

regards
Lauhof