Author Topic: Logan's Profiles - SdKfz 231 Halbkettenfahrzeug  (Read 182922 times)

Offline AXOR

  • Our returned Monkey Box man
Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #30 on: January 01, 2012, 07:44:27 AM »
We want,of course...looks fantastic in luftwaffe markings ! :want:

Alex
Alex

Offline ChernayaAkula

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #31 on: January 01, 2012, 08:25:03 AM »
Jolly good stuff, Logan! Good to have you back in the profile business!  :)



This.......................... on floats!
Cheers,
Moritz

"The appropriate response to reality is to go insane!"

Sentinel Chicken

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #32 on: January 01, 2012, 01:31:20 PM »
One of the advantages to me doing the profiles in Photoshop, however, is that there is a finite limit to what you can do.  This is only an advantage because of the human element making the profile.  If I used vector art, I'd be tempted to include way more detail in the profile than could ever be made out by anyone.  I'm the sort of person that would only realize this after I'd finished typing up the ingredients on the pack of Beemans gum in the pocket of the leather jacket on the pilot.  Fortunately, once I hit pixels, I can call it well and truly done in Photoshop.  That can be a real advantage when you get to the obsession stage of a profile.
I've had this happen to me before. I call it "Mission Creep" in Illustrator. I once had a profile that I worked on for quite literally several months going insane on details before burning out. That taught me a lesson, now what I do depending upon what the illustration is going to be used for is to set hard limits on how closely I'll zoom in to work on a detail. The BAe-146 and A-7 Corsair profiles started out as experiments with these hard limits where I'd zoom no closer than 200%. I also had to keep myself from creating an object within the 100-200% range and then scaling it down, that's just cheating any sort of hard limits I'd set for myself. Over time it's forced me to be more efficient at Illustrator and to think of the gestalt of the whole illustration rather than going apeshit over something that in the finished product would be near invisible.

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
  • Rivet-counting whiffer
Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #33 on: January 01, 2012, 03:21:21 PM »
Thanks, guys, I'm glad you enjoyed it.  I always loved the German aircraft with yellow campaign markings.  Alright, next up, my first profile of the year (by my clock)!



Quote
As early as 1935, Germany began seriously investigating the construction of aircraft carriers for the Kriegsmarine.  At the same time Germany also set about developing an air wing for these carriers.  This would require aircraft suitable for shipboard use.  The design of a modern naval dive bomber met with some difficulty, the initial aircraft being an outdated biplane type.  When the construction of the Graf Zeppelin was placed on hold in 1939, efforts to create an air wing for it were also placed on hold.  After the fall of France, Germany again took a hard look at making the Graf Zeppelin operational.  By this time, a large number of Vought Vikings had been captured, some of the most recent in France having originally been built for the US Navy.  Because of its clear suitability for the role, it was quickly decided to make the “Ju 187 Wiking” the standard shipboard dive bomber of the Graf Zeppelin.

The first aircraft to be reassembled were transferred to Travemünde on the Baltic in Germany for testing using the catapults and arresting wires being tested for use with Germany’s carrier.  Many of these were incomplete, having been stripped of some US Navy-specific equipment, but it did not take long for those components to be fabricated and replaced.  Besides the obvious landing and takeoff trials were tests of naval camouflage, this early scheme being used on an ex-USN SB4U-2.  Inspired by German fighter units, it was also found to be reasonably suitable for the Ju 187 in its intended dive bombing role over water.  This aircraft was later lost during an Allied attack on Travemünde, being damaged beyond economical repair.

Things to note about this profile:

Much cleaner than most previous aircraft, as it's intended for use in Germany in a testing and training environment.  The research for this one was about the hardest thing, the serials of trial units not being well-documented in the least bit.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Damian

  • Some of his profiles take longer to do than kits I've made...
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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #34 on: January 01, 2012, 04:29:56 PM »



Geez Logan your profiles have come so far and are STUNNING! Can't wait to see what comes next.
Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatos nunc

Offline Maverick

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #35 on: January 01, 2012, 06:23:29 PM »
Very nice indeed.  You'll have to throw a hook on it and give it different camo for an operational KM unit.

Regards,

John
Regards,

John

Offline lauhof52

  • Dutchie
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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #36 on: January 01, 2012, 06:36:25 PM »
Very very nice german vikings! Top! :)

Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #37 on: January 01, 2012, 07:19:25 PM »
Love the camo scheme on the See Wiking!

Offline Robert

  • Newly Joined - Welcome me!
Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #38 on: January 01, 2012, 09:27:04 PM »
Lookin' good!

Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #39 on: January 02, 2012, 04:39:48 AM »
AWESOME MAN!!!!!!!!

Offline Doom!

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #40 on: January 02, 2012, 07:06:59 AM »
Very Nice!
Doom!
Jeff G.

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #41 on: January 02, 2012, 11:20:45 AM »
Thanks for the compliments, everyone!  Mav, it already has a tailhook, it's just fully retractable.  You want more schemes, though...

How about 3 more from Travemünde?  I'll post my previous write-up directly below this sentence and another new one underneath the 3 profiles.

Quote
As early as 1935, Germany began seriously investigating the construction of aircraft carriers for the Kriegsmarine.  At the same time Germany also set about developing an air wing for these carriers.  This would require aircraft suitable for shipboard use.  The design of a modern naval dive bomber met with some difficulty, the initial aircraft being an outdated biplane type.  When the construction of the Graf Zeppelin was placed on hold in 1939, efforts to create an air wing for it were also placed on hold.  After the fall of France, Germany again took a hard look at making the Graf Zeppelin operational.  By this time, a large number of Vought Vikings had been captured, some of the most recent in France having originally been built for the US Navy.  Because of its clear suitability for the role, it was quickly decided to make the “Ju 187 Wiking” the standard shipboard dive bomber of the Graf Zeppelin.

The first aircraft to be reassembled were transferred to Travemünde on the Baltic in Germany for testing using the catapults and arresting wires being tested for use with Germany’s carrier.  Many of these were incomplete, having been stripped of some US Navy-specific equipment, but it did not take long for those components to be fabricated and replaced.  Besides the obvious landing and takeoff trials were tests of naval camouflage, this early scheme being used on an ex-USN SB4U-2.  Inspired by German fighter units, it was also found to be reasonably suitable for the Ju 187 in its intended dive bombing role over water.  This aircraft was later lost during an Allied attack on Travemünde, being damaged beyond economical repair.








Quote
The overwhelming majority of Vikings used by the Luftwaffe at Travemünde were originally US Navy Vikings sent to France in the days shortly before France's surrender.  This included a pair of aircraft that had come directly from the factory to enter US Navy service possessing sequential construction numbers and Bureau Numbers.  Fittingly, they entered German military service and received sequential Stammkennzeichen.  While this is normal in units throughout the various armed forces of the world, it is less usual when the aircraft have already served in the colors of three different air arms in their lifetime.  This was not lost on the pilots and ground crew of Travemünde, so the aircraft were named Freya and Freyr after the twin gods of Norse mythology, worshipped by the Vikings a millennia earlier.  Ironically, the "Wikinger-Zwillinge" both came from Naval Reserve Air Base Anacostia, Washington, D.C.

These aircraft are picture in various schemes designed to test visibility over water, the dark grays and greens being most effective over the Baltic and North Atlantic.  They were also tested in various all-up weight configurations on the catapults, proving to be almost too heavy for the catapults at their highest take-off weight.  In contrast, the German arresting gear was shown to be excellent, reliably stopping the rechristened Ju 187s in any configuration.  The one feature of the SB4U Viking that the Luftwaffe considered totally unacceptable was its total lack of folding wings.  Not realizing that the Vought had already solved the very same issue by that time, Junkers set about developing a wing folding mechanism for the Ju 187.  Unsurprisingly, the Junkers wing-fold devised for the navalized Ju 187 was fundamentally the same the one developed by Vought for the SB4U-4, folding back along the fuselage, leading edge pointing downwards.

The unit was jokingly called "The Flying Circus" because of the variety of schemes used on their aircraft, markings and camouflage changing with some regularity.  After yet another series of delays with the carrier Graf Zeppelin, much of the unit's aircraft and personnel were transferred to the Netherlands and operated alongside Erprobungsgruppe 167 (the trials unit for the Fi 167 carrier-based torpedo bomber).  Unfortunately, this change in fortunes and geography earned the unit another name, "the crew of the Flying Dutchman" after the mythical phantom ship.

Things to note about these profiles:

I sort of screwed up on the last profile, since I didn't include the Stammkennzeichen on the bottom of the wing, my previous German profiles having only had Verbandskennzeichen.  I can excuse this as the underside of the aircraft was recently repainted.  Since I had the opportunity to get it right on these three, I did.  The BuNos I used were originally SBC Helldivers that were transferred to France and halfway there when France surrendered, ending their lives on a hillside on Martinique.  The BuNos 1840 & 1841 did in fact come from NRAB Anacostia, while the other came from NRAB St. Louis, close to where I grew up.

I tried to vary the markings and schemes enough to give a variety, including the names Freya and Freyr on the "twins".  Different spinners can also give each aircraft its own character, so I used this to my advantage.

I hope you guys like the story and the profiles!

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Maverick

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #42 on: January 02, 2012, 03:42:07 PM »
Thanks for the explanation Logan.  My fave would be the 3rd of the bunch.

Regards,

John
Regards,

John

Offline lauhof52

  • Dutchie
  • The Decimator Guy!
Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #43 on: January 02, 2012, 06:47:36 PM »
Very realistic story and nice to read!  :) Top german vikings - as always.  8) But Logan...uh, just for my sake, is there any chance you finally get to midway...?

 :want:

regards
Lauhof

Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #44 on: January 03, 2012, 01:49:53 AM »
WOW!!!!!!! :in-love: