Author Topic: 1932 Ariel Rewing 600-S Aerocycle  (Read 213 times)

Offline Small brown dog

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1932 Ariel Rewing 600-S Aerocycle
« on: August 25, 2019, 06:48:29 PM »


Civil and commercial applications for Electro levitation technology was becoming more widely accepted after WW1. During the conflict tethered factory lifting units had been developed for the armament industries. Huge self-mobile transportation vehicles were becoming more common place and it was anticipated that smaller self-contained units for use in commercial and even public transport may soon be just around the corner.

Ever keen to exploit a business opportunity both the motor car and motor cycle industries began to look at the potential of Aerocars and Aerocycles during the mid-1920ís.  However the public mood in relation to the desire to own such vehicles was greatly overestimated. Additionally the first generation were hugely expensive, underpowered and unwieldy.   There were of course some people that were enthusiastic as there always are but the great majority of people were not ready to give up the rubber on the tarmac just yet or, more importantly, the large sums of money to do so. Besides it was just a fad wasnít it?

This mood changed in 1930 when King George V attended the launch of the predator class aerial Battleship: The Tigress. His Majesty made a huge impact by arriving at the event in a Tesla Royce Aero-limousine. The royal Aerocar was quiet although obviously possessing or giving an air of great power. The coachwork was of a style that looked to the future but was suitably restrained. History marks this event as the catalyst for the growing acceptance of Electro Levitation into the motor industries and was also a gift from the gods as far as the managing director at Ariel Motors was concerned.

Ariel was the first to produce and develop an Aerocycle the first of which was available from 1924. It was not a great success but Aerial stuck with the concept and by the late 20ís they had a machine that was reliable and in demand but only to a select and wealthy few. However, the company had financial troubles and went into receivership in 1930. The company was bought for a very good price by the Managing Directors son and Ariel began a new phase.

In a bold and almost prophetic move the new owner concentrated upon the Aerocycle market which became a great success.  Much of this success was down to a talented engineer by the name of Philip Cardew  who himself was a keen Aerocycle enthusiast and had joined Ariel, after being tempted by a huge salary and free hardware, to design the next Ariel Aerocycle generation.

Cardew had worked for the admiralty designing lightweight but powerful engines for dockside and on board munitions carriers. His  designs coupled with a complete working knowledge of Electro levitation technology gave Ariel a lead estimated to be at least 5 years ahead of the competition.

His finest achievement was the Ariel Red Wing 600. A V twin design available in both sport and touring configuration although Cardew was not that interested in the latter. Philip Cardwew was a speed freak at heart and was often seen at race meetings on his own specially tuned and very fast Red Wing which, it is said, was nicknamed Jesus. Apparently this was because any new rider taking the machine for a spin to find out what the fuss was all about could be heard to utter the name of the messiah as soon as they opened the throttle.  In the interests of public safety Production models were a little tamer of course but the Ariel Red Wing was almost universally describes as going like something unmentionable off a highly polished digging implement.



The redwing design went through several incarnations and was available right through to the late 1950ís. During the war a military version was developed ushering in a new age of so called motorised Calvary units which were used to great effect in the desert campaign. However, thatís another story.


Ariel V twin/generator without thrust unit.
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Offline Old Wombat

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Re: 1932 Ariel Redwing 600-S Aerocycle
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2019, 07:39:45 PM »
 ;D :smiley:
"This is the Captain. We have a little problem with our engine sequence, so we may experience some slight turbulence and, ah, explode."

Offline Brian da Basher

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Re: 1932 Ariel Rewing 600-S Aerocycle
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2019, 09:14:54 PM »
That's phenomenally well done, coffee-table book quality!

Brian da Basher

Offline elmayerle

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Re: 1932 Ariel Rewing 600-S Aerocycle
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2019, 06:54:35 AM »
Gorgeous work!!  I can just see a motorized cavalry unit literally hedgehopping in training with the Light Cavalry Overture as background music.

Offline Small brown dog

  • Dwelling too long on the practicalities of such things can drive you mad.
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Re: 1932 Ariel Rewing 600-S Aerocycle
« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2019, 08:26:22 PM »
Gorgeous work!!  I can just see a motorized cavalry unit literally hedgehopping in training with the Light Cavalry Overture as background music.

I really fancy doing this actually and might have to go off and do it :)
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Offline tankmodeler

  • Wisely picking parts of the real universe 2 ignore
Re: 1932 Ariel Rewing 600-S Aerocycle
« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2019, 12:52:29 AM »
Gotta ask:

How, nominally, does such a thing turn? I don't see any aerodynamic surfaces and it doesn't appear the handlebars move anything or that the lift/propulsion thingy pivots in any way.

Paul

Offline Small brown dog

  • Dwelling too long on the practicalities of such things can drive you mad.
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Re: 1932 Ariel Rewing 600-S Aerocycle
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2019, 01:31:55 AM »
Gotta ask:

How, nominally, does such a thing turn? I don't see any aerodynamic surfaces and it doesn't appear the handlebars move anything or that the lift/propulsion thingy pivots in any way.

Paul

Pretentious bull answer:
Repulsion field tech in combination with the small rudder inside the ion thrust tube which you can't see in the image.
There is a drive chain that rotates the projection faces (inside the casings) on the front face of the handlebars.
The Ion thrust power requirement is quite small and not of high thrust.

Real answer:
Christ knows - I got fed up of thinking about it because it was doing my head in.
Also. I used a totally new (for me) texturing method which took some time to get right. I was fed up of the thing my the time I was done :)
Its not that its not real but it could be that its not true.

Offline tankmodeler

  • Wisely picking parts of the real universe 2 ignore
Re: 1932 Ariel Rewing 600-S Aerocycle
« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2019, 11:04:17 PM »
Pretentious bull answer:
Repulsion field tech in combination with the small rudder inside the ion thrust tube which you can't see in the image.
There is a drive chain that rotates the projection faces (inside the casings) on the front face of the handlebars.
The Ion thrust power requirement is quite small and not of high thrust.

Real answer:
Christ knows - I got fed up of thinking about it because it was doing my head in.
Also. I used a totally new (for me) texturing method which took some time to get right. I was fed up of the thing my the time I was done :)
Totally acceptable answers on both counts!  :D