Author Topic: Heston Type 9 "Adder"  (Read 7960 times)

Offline perttime

  • The man has produced a Finnish Napier Heston Fighter...need we say more?
Re: Heston Type 9 "Adder" - Heston Adder Mk.II
« Reply #15 on: June 15, 2013, 02:24:26 PM »
Before Adder Mk.I became operational, it was decided that something should - and could - be done about its shortcomings. Heatshielded fuselage bottom and an all-metal tailwheel were adequate to keep the fighter from scorching itself when running the engine on the ground. That only left the problem of setting fire to grass airstrips and melting the tarmac ones. A tricycle landing gear was the obvious solution, and Heston engineers quickly designed a retractable nosewheel, and mainwheels with an altered geometry that put them behind the aircraft's center of gravity. These changes were first tested on the second Adder prototype - and then rushed into production aircraft that were not yet too far finished on the production line. An additional benefit was improved forward visibility during taxiing.

The range of the Adder was adequate for training and point defence purposes but more would have been better for allround fighter performance. The use of tip tanks had already been demonstrated by the US P-80 fighter, and others, and it was decided to make them available on Adder Mk.II. However, it was felt that in many circumstances the additional weight of the tanks would decrease aircraft performance. The solution was to deliver them with both conventional and tank wing tips. Tips tanks could then be fitted - or removed - in operational units, as needed.

Denmark had been looking for a fighter aircraft to replace their Spitfire Mk.IX fighters that were becoming outdated by 1945. In discussions with the British Air Ministry in September 1946, it was discovered that the RAF was willing to let go part of their Adder fighters and focus on the Gloster Meteor. The Royal Danish Air Force received the news with enthusiasm and sent over instructor pilots for conversion to the type. The first eight of 60 Danish Heston Adder Mk.II aircraft landed at Kastrup airport on 21 February 1947, and a conversion course for operational pilots from Eskadrille 725 was started the next day. Danish Adders protected the small country and its surrounding sea areas until 1952 when they were replaced with SAAB 29 aircraft. In that time, they were used to shoot down 164 Soviet aircraft, for the loss of 18 Adders.


Offline perttime

  • The man has produced a Finnish Napier Heston Fighter...need we say more?
Re: Heston Type 9 "Adder" - Lithuanian Mk.1
« Reply #16 on: June 17, 2013, 07:19:47 PM »
When Lithuania was liberated from six years of Soviet occupation in 1946, most of its Air Force pilots had been serving in Western, mainly British and French, forces. An own Air Force was seen as a necessity for the liberated nation, from both the practical point of view and for building national spirit. For some time Lithuania coped with older fighter models like Spitfire Mk.V and  Avia B.135.

Technology had developed rapidly and the older aircraft did not have the speed and firepower of only a few years later models. The latest fighter aircraft were not easy to get in a time of war, though, and funds were short. In 1948, British Air Ministry informed their Lithuanian counterparts that they would be willing to donate a number of Heston Adder Mk.I jet fighters. With the taildragger landing gear, the Mk.I was hard on airfields but the Lithuanians decided that they would cope.

28 Adders were flown to Kaunas airfield between 17 and 29 October 1948, and Lithuanian fighter pilots and mechanics were soon converted to operating jet fighters. In addition, 15 sets of wing tip tanks were acquired to extend the range of at least some of the aircraft. Inspired by the Norwegian "coastal camo", Lithuania's Air Force decided to paint their aircraft in a two-tone shape-disrupting camouflage scheme.

« Last Edit: June 17, 2013, 07:32:35 PM by perttime »

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Heston Type 9 "Adder"
« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2013, 02:10:55 AM »
 :)
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

Offline Brian da Basher

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Re: Heston Type 9 "Adder"
« Reply #18 on: June 19, 2013, 04:03:48 AM »
Well done, perttime! The Lithuanian one is a stunner.

Brian da Basher

Offline perttime

  • The man has produced a Finnish Napier Heston Fighter...need we say more?
Re: Heston Type 9 "Adder"
« Reply #19 on: June 21, 2013, 06:49:08 PM »
As the GB is extended - - - I might add a variant. Or maybe two, if I manage to make a two-seater that I like.

Offline perttime

  • The man has produced a Finnish Napier Heston Fighter...need we say more?
Re: Heston Type 9 "Adder"
« Reply #20 on: June 22, 2013, 07:48:52 PM »
A name for a night figter was suggested to me....

Offline perttime

  • The man has produced a Finnish Napier Heston Fighter...need we say more?
Re: Heston Type 9 "Adder" - Blackadder night fighter - RAF
« Reply #21 on: June 23, 2013, 05:46:34 PM »
Even in late 1940s, Heston Adder was not quite up to the speeds of the latest jet fighters like Gloster Meteor, MiG-9, and Yak-23. It was quite capable of intercepting any bomber, though, and there was absolutely nothing wrong with the concentrated firepower of its 4 20 mm Hispano guns. As Soviet night bombing raids of Western cities had become a concern, RAF rotated most of their remaining Adders through a conversion to Mk. III nigh fighters. The conversion mainly consisted of installing a Telefunken radar system and painting the aircraft black. The "color" scheme prompted a new - first unofficial - name for the night fighter: the "Blackadder".

« Last Edit: June 24, 2013, 12:03:23 AM by perttime »

Offline perttime

  • The man has produced a Finnish Napier Heston Fighter...need we say more?
Re: Heston Type 9 "Adder" - Blackadder night fighter - Eire
« Reply #22 on: June 23, 2013, 05:48:10 PM »
As Armstrong Whitworth got up to speed producing the night fighter version of the Meteor in 1950, RAF's Blackadders were offered to allies who did not yet have radar equipped night fighters. 18 of them went to Ireland where the Air Corps mainly stationed them at the Casement Aerodrome (Aeradróm Mhic Easmainn), not too far from Dublin. The Casement Aerodrome had, and has, generally more favorable weather conditions than Dublin Airport, allowing better availability of interceptors.


Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Heston Type 9 "Adder"
« Reply #23 on: June 24, 2013, 01:55:29 AM »
I can see one of these being built with the crew chief being Baldrick...with a cunning plan! ;D
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

Offline Dr. YoKai

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Re: Heston Type 9 "Adder"
« Reply #24 on: June 24, 2013, 09:41:16 PM »
 Just don't let Percy on the tarmac... I have to say thats the most nearly perfect combination of color
 scheme/National insignia that I have ever seen.

Offline perttime

  • The man has produced a Finnish Napier Heston Fighter...need we say more?
Re: Heston Type 9 "Adder"
« Reply #25 on: June 24, 2013, 11:33:45 PM »
 ;D
Looks as if I'm not the only one who got some chuckles out of the name - which was suggested to me, along with the black color.
The red lettering that I've seen in some RAF night fighter pictures looks good to me - might as well use it....

Offline buzzbomb

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Re: Heston Type 9 "Adder"
« Reply #26 on: June 25, 2013, 06:50:49 AM »
really nice work on thos profiles.. and good backstory as well