Author Topic: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken  (Read 48411 times)

Offline lauhof52

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #50 on: January 14, 2012, 11:33:33 PM »
Your Orions are absolutely First Class, Mr Chicken!

Brian da Basher

I second that! ;D

Offline Bladerunner

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #51 on: January 15, 2012, 05:35:45 AM »
Your Orions are absolutely First Class, Mr Chicken!

Brian da Basher
Dont want to lay an egg now, but those Orions are fantastic.   :)
« Last Edit: January 15, 2012, 05:37:44 AM by Bladerunner »

Offline Maverick

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #52 on: January 15, 2012, 09:24:09 AM »
Very nice Orions.

Regards,

John
Regards,

John

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #53 on: January 27, 2012, 03:23:09 AM »
With the post-war airlines of France dependent upon US aircraft, the French government was anxious to not only restore the country's aviation industry, but to also enter the race to build jet aircraft. While developments in the US market showed intentions to use jet aircraft for long-distance routes both over the Atlantic and on transcontinental trunk routes, European airlines planned for the introduction of jet aircraft on the shorter routes between major European centers. With the British working on the Vickers Viscount to complement the De Haviland Comet on European routes (the Viscount specifications stemming from the post-war Brabazon planning committee's recommendations for a short-haul turbine airliner to serve European routes), France decided in 1951 to place its bets on a pure jet for short-haul routes given that the manufacturers of the time lacked significant capital and resources to develop a long-haul aircraft to rival the Comet and the 707.

A year later design finalists were selected for the new jetliner and of the three entrants, in what was an unorthodox design of the time, a twin rear-engined design from Sud-Est (which would later merge with Sud-Ouest to form Sud-Aviation which in 1970 would form the nucleus of Aerospatiale) designated the SE-210 won the competition and would be christened the "Caravelle". The first prototype would fly in 1955 and set an aesthetic design standard that few aircraft today meet with graceful lines and distinctive triangular windows. Her rear twin-engined layout at the time was revolutionary as it made for a quiet cabin and a clean, efficient, and unobstructed wing. But her design was classically French and certainly ranks as one of the most aesthetically pleasing commercial jetliners ever built.

Given that the Caravelles accommodated the same number of passengers as the larger regional jets of today, I figured why not create a regional jet that builds upon the Caravelle's graceful design ethic. I had first done this back around 2004 and decided to redo the illustrations to print standards using Illustrator CS2 (what I had done back then was to use Paint Shop Pro 7.0 and it wasn't up to print quality) This is what I call the "Caravelle 2000" which would be an all-new regional jet design that retains the spirit of the original Caravelle in its appearance and design.



Since Air France was the launch customer of the original Caravelle (Air France put their original Caravelles in service on the Paris-Istanbul route in May 1959), they'd of course be a launch customer for the Caravelle 2000. Here she is in the colors of Air France's regional partner, Brit Air. I would envision the Caravelle 2000 as an all-new RJ coming from a joint-venture between Aerospatiale (the Caravelle's original builder) and Dassault- since Dassault has had extensive experience with small jets in their Falcon business jet product line, it makes sense to me to have them onboard in the design of the Caravelle 2000.

I retained the distinctive triangular windows of the original Caravelle as well as a sleek nose that resembles the Comet nose used on the original Caravelle- cabin width would be something on par with the Embraer ERJ-170 family. I kept the cruciform tail layout with a dorsal fin extension hearkening back to the extended dorsal spine on the original Caravelle.



Here she is in the colors of SAS' regional partner, Scandanavian Commuter. The world's first Caravelle service was flown by SAS in April 1959, so of course we'd have to have SAS flying the Caravelle 2000 as well. The wing layout would be the usual swept-back slender wings that we see these days on RJ-class aircraft- maybe supercritical or whatever would be most efficient for the flight profiles typical for RJs. Instead of a winglet or a raked wingtip (rakelet), I went with the canted winglets similar to what would have been offered on the Envoy 7, the business jet version of the aborted Fairchild Dornier 728JET. On the Envoy 7 they were referred to as "shark winglets".



To make the original Caravelle more appealing, Sud-Aviation rolled out the Caravelle III which would be the first major variant of the design. She featured uprated Avon engines which allowed increased performance and capacity. Alitalia would be the first to put the Caravelle III in service in 1960 and many of the original Caravelles would be retrofitted to the upgraded standard. So given that, here's the Caravelle 2000 in the colors of Alitalia Express. I've always found Alitalia's livery a simple yet classic look with respect to the tail design- let's hope Alitalia doesn't follow the current trend to blandness! Alitalia named its original Caravelles for stars in the sky. So this one has the name "Procyon" just under the cheatline on the nose.



And finally, here's the Caravelle 2000 in the colors of Iberia's regional partner, Air Nostrum. Iberia was also one of the customers of the original Caravelle and their current colors are also a sharp look on this aircraft. This one is actually my favorite of this group.

A note on the designation "2000-10". This was something Dassault did with their Mirage 2000 series fighters- the upgraded series of jets designated "2000-5". So for the Caravelle 2000, the -10 is the baseline series, with stretched versions being the -20, -30, etc. Stay tuned for those illustrations.

Enjoy!

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #54 on: January 27, 2012, 03:45:25 AM »
Sweet! :)
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #55 on: January 27, 2012, 03:45:48 AM »
The Caravelle 2000 looks amazing!  :-*

Offline Brian da Basher

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #56 on: January 27, 2012, 08:05:44 AM »
Way cool Caravelles, Mr Chicken!

Brian da Basher

Offline elmayerle

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #57 on: January 27, 2012, 10:13:32 AM »
Very seriously attractive Caravelles.  Would the updated Avons be replaced by RR Tays (the later ones, the higher-bypass Spey derivatives)?

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #58 on: January 27, 2012, 10:00:20 PM »
Very seriously attractive Caravelles.  Would the updated Avons be replaced by RR Tays (the later ones, the higher-bypass Spey derivatives)?
I kinda had something in the BR700 family in mind for the powerplant, but the RR Tay engine would also be suitable, too. I guess I was thinking of the BR700 for the newness factor given that the Tay is based on the older technology of the Spey engine.

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #59 on: January 27, 2012, 10:03:48 PM »
A recent real-world work:



Midway Airlines DC-9 Series 14 | N1056T | MSN 45737 | LN 49 | Delivery livery October 1979

Even though Midway Airlines got its operating certificate prior to the passage of deregulation, the Chicago-based airline is recognized as the first post deregulation start up carrier, launching services in October of 1979 with three ex-Trans World Airlines DC-9-14s. N1056T, the subject of this print, was the airline’s first aircraft and was painted at TWA's maintenance base in Kansas City (MCI) in Midway colors before being delivered to the airline. Flying out of Midway Airport, the airline pitched its services as a hassle-free alternative to O’Hare airport. The first services were between Chicago Midway, Cleveland (Burke), Kansas City, and Detroit. The services were an instant success and by the following year additional DC-9s were purchased to launch services to New York La Guardia, St. Louis and Washington National.

The airline’s growth led to a renaissance of redevelopment and investment at Midway Airport that attracted other airlines back to what was once Chicago’s main airport before O’Hare’s opening. Even though Midway ceased operations in 1991, its legacy has left Chicago Midway Airport as one of the major airports of the United States.

The livery on this print was used for the first several years of Midway's operations before the introduction of a red/maroon scheme around 1982 or so. 

Some detail views from this print:




And an overview of the entire print:



Sentinel Chicken

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #60 on: January 27, 2012, 10:27:34 PM »
Another real-world jetliner project, this one is Frontier (the old Frontier), which was fixture of my youth growing up in the Midwest:



Frontier Airlines 727-100/200 | N7270F and N7276F | "Arrow Jets" livery | 1966-1972

There was a time in the 1970s when Frontier Airlines was the one of the most significant operators of the Boeing 737 and it was on the dependable 737-200 that the airline rose to prominence to challenge the established major carriers of the day. To go from humble beginnings flying second-hand Douglas DC-3s to having the second largest route network in the United States when the first 737-200s arrived at the airline is a story that for the most part has remained hidden to history, overshadowed by the storied legacies of larger airlines like American, Delta, or United.

Frontier's first jets were actually 727-100s styled as "Arrow Jets" which first entered service with Frontier in 1966, becoming the first local service carrier to fly the 727. The first orders were placed in 1965 for 5 aircraft with options for 5 more at a cost of $55 million. It was a gutsy gamble- Frontier was ordering planes for routes that it had not yet been awarded by the Civil Aeronautics Board! The first aircraft to be delivered was N7270F arriving in September 1966 and the last 727-100 being delivered by July 1967. The 727-100s were outfitted for 24 seats in first class and 75 seats in coach. The first routes flown were on the newly awarded routes between St. Louis and Salt Lake City that also had intermediate stops at Kansas City Downtown, Lincoln, Denver and Grand Junction.

Route expansions (aided by the acquisition of Fort Worth-based Central Airlines in 1967) and further route authorities granted by the Civil Aeronautics Board to Dallas Love Field brought about the move in 1968 to larger 727-200s with an order for 5 727-200s which were styled as "Super Jet 727s" by the airline. Only a year later in 1969 Lewis Dymond, president of Frontier, retired- at the helm of the airline since 1962, Dymond did much to restore the airline to profitability through the latter half of 1960s that allowed the acquisition of jet equipment. Replacing Dymond was E. Paul Burke. Burke only served at the helm of the airline for a short two years, but his legacy to the airline was his realization in 1969 that the 737-200 was far more suited to Frontier's network than the 727s. The first five 737-200s were ordered as one of his first acts as president of the airline and the 727-100s were traded in to Boeing as part of the payment for the first 737s. Within a year the -100s were phased out with the last 727-100 leaving Frontier in December 1969. All 5 of those -100s would later end up with Braniff International.

The 737-200s could serve even smaller airports than the larger 727s and this allowed Frontier a more flexible aircraft for its route network- the new jets were at home flying to smaller cities like Scottsbluff, Nebraska or Grand Junction, Colorado just as easily as larger cities like Dallas or Denver. By the time the first 737-200s were delivered, in terms of cities served, Frontier had the second-largest route network in the United States.

The first 737-191s arrived in April 1969 and by 1970 had 10 737-200s on strength with the airline. By the time of Burke's departure from the executive suite in 1971, the 727s were being phased out for good- only 3 of 4 727-200s were delivered and all three were phased out by April 1972, again as with the -100s, all of them ended up with Braniff International.

Succeeding Burke would be Frontier's greatest president, Al Feldman. Under Feldman's tenure from 1971 to 1979, Frontier standardized its jet equipment on the 737-200 and entered a period of impressive expansion, profitability and rise to prominence as one of the largest regional carriers in the United States. By the time of the introduction of the final Saul Bass colors in April 1978, Frontier had 32 737-200s on strength with 10 more on order. Frontier's western route network stretched into both Canada and Mexico, from California and Washington in the West to as far east as Michigan and Georgia. Denver Stapleton became one of the few three-airline major hubs of its day, with Frontier ably holding its own against incumbents Continental and United. Undoubtedly it was the flexible operating economics of the 737-200 that allowed Frontier to weather the economic turmoil that hit the industry in the early 1970s.

The Boeing 727-100/200 remain but a short footnote in Frontier's history as a result, but an important one as they were the first local service carrier to fly the 727 and it gave them valuable jet experience until the 737-200 fleet was able to shoulder the burden of passenger services.

Some detail views from this print:


 


And an overview of the entire print:



Offline Brian da Basher

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #61 on: January 28, 2012, 06:05:37 AM »
Thank you, Mr Chicken! It's a treat to see the Frontier livery again and your work really brings it to life!

Brian da Basher

Offline Talos

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #62 on: January 28, 2012, 10:36:02 AM »
Nice work on those 727s and the Diesel-9. Very good detail. I have to say though, I was blown away by those Caravelles. Outstanding!

Offline apophenia

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #63 on: January 28, 2012, 10:49:31 AM »
Nice work on those 727s and the Diesel-9. Very good detail. I have to say though, I was blown away by those Caravelles. Outstanding!

Seconded!  :)
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Offline elmayerle

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #64 on: January 28, 2012, 12:51:38 PM »
Very seriously attractive Caravelles.  Would the updated Avons be replaced by RR Tays (the later ones, the higher-bypass Spey derivatives)?
I kinda had something in the BR700 family in mind for the powerplant, but the RR Tay engine would also be suitable, too. I guess I was thinking of the BR700 for the newness factor given that the Tay is based on the older technology of the Spey engine.
Well, parts of it are, but the fan is definitely newer aerodynamics and I believe aero updates were done where feasible.  I've been giving thought to a "cropped-fan Tay" to power a Buccaneer S.3/K.3/E.3 family.

Offline elmayerle

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #65 on: January 28, 2012, 12:54:10 PM »
Very seriously attractive Caravelles.  Would the updated Avons be replaced by RR Tays (the later ones, the higher-bypass Spey derivatives)?
I kinda had something in the BR700 family in mind for the powerplant, but the RR Tay engine would also be suitable, too. I guess I was thinking of the BR700 for the newness factor given that the Tay is based on the older technology of the Spey engine.
A stretched version powered by JT8D-200 series engines?  Not the newest, but a significant improvement over earlier JT8Ds.  It would also be interesting to see what you'd get if the JT8D-200 series improvements were "read across" to the JT8B/J52 engine for Intruders, late-model Skyhawks, etc.

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #66 on: January 28, 2012, 12:54:33 PM »
 :-*  Beautiful work.
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Jeff G.

Offline elmayerle

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #67 on: January 28, 2012, 12:57:42 PM »
Gorgeous Frontier aircraft!!  I wonder how those markings would look on a stretched C.102 with modern engines?

Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #68 on: January 28, 2012, 08:18:46 PM »
Really beautiful airliners.  :-*

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #69 on: January 31, 2012, 12:57:20 PM »


Greenlandair Boeing 727-100C | OY-DRM | "Sululik" | 1970s colors WHAT-IF?


Greenlandair was established on 7 November 1960 as a joint venture between SAS (Scandanavian Airlines System) and the Danish mining company Kryolitselskabet Øresund which had operations in Greenland. Two years later, the Greenland National Council and the Royal Greenland Trading Company came aboard as equal shareholders. The airline's initial purpose was to resupply four American early warning radar stations that stretched across the island- for this, a DC-4 was chartered from Iceland and 2 Sikorsky S-55 helicopters were chartered from Canada. Not long after the resupply flights began that passenger services were started using a ski-equipped De Havilland Canada DHC-3 Otter and a Consolidated PBY Catalina outfitted to carry 20 passengers.

In the early 1960s, there were only two airports in all of Greenland outside of the USAF base at Thule in the extreme north- Kangerlussuaq (back then called Sondrestromfjord AB) and Narsarsuaq (back then called Bluie West One AB). With a string of coastal communities that lacked airports, the Catalina was ideal as it could alight in the adjacent fjords, but an accident in 1962 involving the Catalina had the airline shift to the use of helicopters and in 1965 three Sikorsky S-61s fitted out for passenger services were delivered from the manufacturer. Six heliports were built in the coastal communities. With eight S-61s by the early 1970s, Greenlandair soon had the most extensive helicopter route network of any airline in the world.

The need for long range flights to Denmark and North America still existed, and the chartered DC-4 was replaced in 1963 by another DC-4. It flew as far east as Copenhagen and NAS Keflavik in Iceland and as far west as the NORAD radar stations in extreme eastern Canada.

More capable DC-6Bs were purchased in 1971 to replace the single DC-4. OY-DRC was named "Amalik" and OY-DRM was named "Sululik". But suppose in our alternate historical timeline Greenlandair has a need for more cargo capacity and decides on the Boeing 727-100C instead? With its ability to carry both main deck cargo and passengers in mixed configuration, it would have been a versatile aircraft for Greenlandair with greater payload capacity, speed, and range the the DC-6Bs that were operated from 1971 to 1980.

(This still blows my mind that there were regular passenger services until 1980 on the DC-6B with Greenlandair!)

This illustration uses the distinctive red/white/black livery used on the DC-6Bs on the 727-100. The aircraft in this print is "Sululik" and uses the same registration as the real world Sululik, OY-DRM. The name is on the forward nose just like it was on the DC-6Bs and you'll also note that I have this 727-100 equipped with the long HF antenna stinger on tail as that would have been a must with the long and remote routes it might have flown.

Some detail views from this profile:




And the entire illustration:



Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #70 on: January 31, 2012, 04:59:24 PM »
That is one good looking jet!

Offline Brian da Basher

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #71 on: February 01, 2012, 08:20:27 AM »
Love that Greenlandair livery Mr Chicken!

Brian da Basher

Offline ChernayaAkula

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #72 on: February 01, 2012, 08:55:24 AM »
Damn, but that Caravelle 2000 is sexy!  :-*  Not that much into airliners, but if I were to scratch-build one, it'd be that!
Cheers,
Moritz

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #73 on: May 16, 2012, 10:49:56 AM »
Another real world work, this one has proved to be very popular with former Ozark employees thanks to a good friend who used to work for them. I have more whiff stuff to post, maybe after Scalefest this weekend......



Ozark Air Lines DC-9 Series 15 | N970Z & N971Z | Delivery colors, two variations (1966, 1980)

Through the early 1960s, many of the local service carriers of the United States had been exploring upgrades to pure-jet equipment to keep up with the technological advances in air transport that the large trunk airlines were following. In the latter half of that decade, many of the local service carriers like West Coast, Mohawk and Ozark would introduce pure jet equipment to their fleets, but also would use turboprop aircraft as a replacement for their smaller piston engined types, the most commonly replaced aircraft being the venerable Douglas DC-3. St. Louis-based Ozark Air Lines followed the trends in the industry of the day.

On 9 December 1958 Ozark received several new route awards that covered seven Midwestern states and the time was right for the airline to upgrade from its traditional fleet of DC-3s that it had operated since its beginnings in 1950. The first turbine equipment would be the Fokker F-27s that were delivered starting in 1959 and soon would follow with the larger Fairchild-built FH-227 turboprops. But that wasn't enough for Ozark. Even with the addition of Convair 240s and Martin 404s to replace the DC-3s, pure jets were the way to go as new route authorities were coming that involved longer routes that would put Ozark in direct competition with the larger trunk carriers like American Airlines and Trans World.

As early as 1961 Ozark had considered purchasing the British Aircraft Corporation BAC One-Eleven (Mohawk would eventually select the One-Eleven). Eventually the airline would place an order for the Douglas DC-9 Series 10- with a capacity of up to 90 passengers, it was in ideal step in to pure jet transport operations without too large of a jump in capacity. Ozark's Series 10s were fitted out for 78 passengers and the rugged design of the DC-9 with its self-contained forward and aft airstairs made it an ideal fit with Ozark's operations.

This print depicts Ozark's first two DC-9 jets, both Series 15s. The lower aircraft is the first one, N970Z, delivered 25 May 1966, and it wears the delivery colors as they appeared at that time. The upper aircraft is Ozark's second DC-9, N971Z, delivered 10 July 1966, and it wears the late-style variation of the delivery colors with the larger fuselage titles and expanded white area on the fuselage. This variation became more common on Ozark's DC-9 fleet as the 1980s approached and would soon be replaced with the later two-tone green striped livery that the airline used until its 1986 acquisition by TWA.

Ozark inaugurated its first pure jet services with N970Z on 8 July 1966 between St. Louis and Chicago and soon expanded jet services to other cities in its network. Interestingly at the time, American and TWA were either cutting back or eliminating entirely their services out of the Greater Peoria Airport and Ozark stepped in with DC-9 services with route authorities to the East Coast. Peoria's airport was pitched as a hassle-free alternative to Chicago O'Hare and to an extent, Chicago Midway. With New York La Guardia, Washington National, Kansas City and Denver now getting jet services, Ozark found opposition from the City of Chicago and O'Hare's two largest operators, United and American. After a lengthy series of hearings, the services were approved to the East Coast in 1969. The Peoria-Washington National route would become Ozark's longest nonstop route as the route to Denver was a one stop route. By the end of 1969, jet services allowed Ozark to expand into the South with its first services to Tulsa and Dallas Love Field starting in October of that year.

Some detail views from this print:




And an overview of the entire print:




Now for one of my favorite commercials featuring Ozark's first DC-9. "Get up and go! Cover Mid-America at 560 miles per hour aboard Ozark's new DC-9 jets by Douglas. The time you save will be all your own." Love it.

Sentinel Chicken

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #74 on: May 16, 2012, 10:53:00 AM »
Recent real world stuff I'll have available at Scalefest this weekend:





Oh, and this one, I've always wanted a Pan Am 747SP for my own walls in my aero-sanctuary.



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