Author Topic: Klaatu  (Read 7384 times)

Offline Silver Fox

  • Talk to me Goose!
Klaatu
« on: January 30, 2014, 10:29:15 AM »
The following story, when complete, will be my entry in the Space GB. This is just the beginning, please do not adjust your sets.

Klaatu

The B’aran were an old race, old even for this part of the Galactic core. Their original homeworld had been consumed eons ago, savaged by the sun which had birthed it. The B’aran had a nascent starflight capacity by then and they had emigrated… the entire race had simply left their world and become nomads. It was a massive undertaking for an entire planetary population to pick up and leave, but that was exactly what they had done.

The first stop was a neighbouring star not far from their original. That star too was doomed, but it bought almost four centuries for the B’aran to complete the adaptation to a nomadic lifestyle. Ships were designed, built and tested and then redesigned with knowledge gained. Scouts explored nearby star systems, finding primitive life or no life at all. The Galactic core was a location seething with the energies of stars being born and destroyed… but intelligent life was almost completely missing.

The first time the B’aran encountered a sapient race they were primitives, The B’aran were treated as Gods, a position they took as their just due. In due course they had pillaged everything they could from the star system, leaving the hapless natives to whither on the vine. They would never know there was a larger universe, never know that their “Gods” had taken everything from them… including their future.

A similar pattern would emerge for the next 5 or 6 millennia. The B’aran would encounter a sapient race, appear as gods and pillage whatever of value was to be had. The B’aran learned quickly that having the indigenes worship them and provide the labour for their own planet’s pillage was the easiest course. It was a successful pattern that would govern the B’aran until something better arrived. During this period the B’aran population grew from the 3.5 billion that had fled their homeworld to over 40 billion encamped aboard the B’aran worldships.

The Glotta were a peaceful, almost idyllic race of people. They eschewed technology, living a pacific lifestyle that met basic requirements for life and maximized the possibilities for quiet reflection. They were also powerful telepaths, so powerful that the Glotta lacked even the most basic of auditory cues. A Glotta made no sound when experiencing pain or terror, but all but a mind-blind individual could “hear” the psychic scream.

The Glotta were fully aware of the arrival of the first B’aran scoutship, and later when almost 20,000 B’aran worldships appeared in the skies. They ignored both arrivals. The B’aran landed and demanded tribute, the Glotta ignored them. The B’aran gathered hostages and tied them to stakes, to be burned for their “insolence” in the face of their betters.

The fires were duly lit and the Glotta made not a sound, simply writhed in the flames. Half the Glotta population died in the massive psychic cry of horror and pain which ensued. 34 billion B’aran died in that split second of psychic shock. The incident would mark the B’aran for the remainder of time. The Glotta reflected on the transience of all corporeal life and simply moved on.

It was a lesson the B’aran would take to heart, any future race that even appeared to have psychic ability was to be avoided at all costs.

Offline apophenia

  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: Klaatu
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2014, 12:12:30 PM »
Star Trek meets the Tudor era! I like it  :)
The doorbell's ringing, could be the elves
But it's probably the werewolf ...

Offline Silver Fox

  • Talk to me Goose!
Re: Klaatu
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2014, 07:12:54 AM »
Part II: The Balen

When the B’aran scoutship dropped out of stardrive there was considerable confusion on the bridge. Both primary and secondary sensor stations reported the presence of technologically advanced species… but on different bearings. The two systems were main-sequence stars, and the energy signatures suggested that the two systems were independent. There was little overlap in the frequencies and modulations of the electronic emissions.

The scoutship remained on station for 50% longer than a normal scouting operation, but scouted two worlds in that time. Returning to the fleet of B’aran worldships they duly reported their findings. A large component of the leadership wanted to simply avoid the whole area, fearing that a technological species might be too far advanced to simply cow in the established pattern. There was no evidence that either species was telepathic, and after a contentious battle those in favour of conquest won out. The “avoiders” did win one concession… the less advanced species would be struck first. Once conquest was assured the fleet would leave a caretaker operation in place and move on the more advanced species.

3,000 years had passed since the disastrous and abortive conquest on Glotta, but the B’aran were still unsettled when they moved on the planet of Balen. Glotta had been an unusual situation that had ended badly, and now they faced another unusual situation. A single scoutship crept closer and closer to Balen, finding little to worry about. There were no system defences to mention and little interplanetary traffic. The species was obviously capable of interplanetary flight, but didn’t seem to do much of it.

The scout crept back out system after completing its mission and reported back to the fleet. Strategy was plotted and it was decided that the fleet would drop into the system only a few hours from orbit. The Balen would be overwhelmed with sheer numbers.

It didn’t work that way.

The Balen were well aware of their sentient stellar neighbours, they were also violently xenophobic. They knew they lagged somewhat behind the neighbours in terms of technology, not yet having mastered stardrive. The combination meant that the Balen were also well aware of the approach of the B’aran. The very first scout had generated a powerful electromagnetic pulse on emergence from starflight… and it had been detected.

Most of the Balen had immediately gone to ground; they hid from the invader to avoid detection. A few ships had remained in flight so as not to arouse suspicion. It had almost been too few; the B’aran had started to wonder about the lack of traffic. Had the B’aran looked closer they might have noticed something far more important to their needs… the system was largely stripped bare of easily portable resources.

For over a century the Balen had mined, smelted and gathered resources in their system and hid them away. They weren’t going to have their system stripped by an invader if it could be helped. The arrival of the B’aran wasn’t the threat that they had prepared for, but it was so very close as to make no difference.

12,000 B’aran worldships dropped into realspace just over two hour’s flight time from Balen. Their systems took 140 seconds to stabilize after the jump and for nearly 700… they didn’t have that much time. Balen space exploded as the Balen defences sprang into operation. There were only 6,000 defence ships and almost all of them were smaller than even a B’aran scout, but all were pure warships.

In the opening salvo the ready alert ships had launched 1,000 nuclear tipped missiles. The second salvo was just under 12,000 missiles and the B’aran defences would have been simply swamped except that many missiles had been targeted on the same ships. The opening salvo had crossed the tortured space left in the wake of the mass stardrive jump and homed on the largest targets. The second salvo had almost exclusively gone after scouts, assuming them to be escort vessels. Of 20,500 scouts, just under 7400 died in the second salvo and already commands were racing out from the B’aran flagship to flee the system.

11,207 B’aran worldships and 8265 scouts escaped Balen space. They accounted for 2983 Balen defence ships, but had no idea if more defences were waiting further in-system. In just over 7 minutes the B’aran had learned to avoid not just telepaths, but also space fairing species.

Offline Volkodav

  • Counts rivits with his abacus...
  • Much older now...but procrastinating about it
Re: Klaatu
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2014, 08:52:42 AM »
Loving this, can't wait for future installments.

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Klaatu
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2014, 02:56:33 AM »
Loving this, can't wait for future installments.

Ditto! :)
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

You can't outrun Death forever.
But you can make the Bastard work for it.

Offline Alvis 3.1

  • Self acknowledged "Bad Influence"…but probably less attractive than Pink
  • The high priest of whiffing
Re: Klaatu
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2014, 04:36:30 AM »
Some serious alien arse kicking happening there! Love it!

Alvis 3.1

Offline Silver Fox

  • Talk to me Goose!
Re: Klaatu
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2014, 06:31:11 AM »
Part III: Proscribed Space

The B’aran scoutship hung motionless in space, faint reflections gleaming against the silvered surface of its hull. The scout would have appeared to be at rest, if the tiny flickers of light on its hull hadn’t indicated that the ship was quivering. The slight quiver was caused by the powerful realspace engines, engines that even now strained to cause the ship to move. Movement of the length of a single wavelength of light would have been an improvement over the utter stasis of the last half hour. The titanic engines strained, forces incomprehensible to more primitive species threw themselves into the void… and accomplished, nothing.

The scout had dropped into this area of realspace unexpectedly some 40 minutes ago. The stardrive jump should have continued to the glittering cluster of stars seen ˝ light-year ahead, but something had thrown the ship out of stardrive. Now that, or a similar force, held the ship motionless against all that its massive engines could deliver. Over the next several hours the ship strained and fought, gaining nothing from its efforts except an expenditure of fuel. The commander grew weary of the task of fighting to do nothing and ordered the stardrive re-engaged.

The scout vanished from realspace as the stardrive came to full power… and never re-emerged.

A week later, the scout long overdue, another scout was pulled out of stardrive and fought the same mysterious force that had held the first. Under strict orders to return and report any unusual occurrence, the ship fought for only a brief period of time before reversing course. It was noted by all the crew that the turn was not resisted, nor was the efforts of the realspace engines to push the scout away from the barrier. Only the commander noted that the exhaust plume of the realspace engines passed the point where the scout had been stopped. Passed and continued on as if nothing was in their way.

The scout made its report and it was decided that the fleet would stand off, making no attempt to enter the area of the strange force. Scouts would probe the edges to determine the extent of the effect, and one ship would try the barrier to learn more about it. That ship would be one of the worldship-sized warships that had been built in the wake of the Balen disaster 4500 years ago. Massive, and massively powerful, it was thought that if any fleet vessel could decipher the strange phenomenon, it would be one of these behemoths.

Escorted by the last scout to probe the barrier, the warship arrived at the barrier. It too had been pulled out of stardrive, just as the smaller vessels had been. Now it turned its massive powers on the barrier itself. Weapons fired at the barrier proved useless. Beams passed right through the barrier without interference, and material weapons were stopped as surely as the ship itself.

The warship slowly backed away from the mysterious spot in space and fired weapons targeted not to pass through the barrier, but to detonate just before contact. The glare of furious fusion detonations lit space and threw reflections off both warship and scout. Gentle probing by both scout and warship proved that the barrier itself has unharmed.

The warship backed further away and then powerful engine flares sprang from the rear as it accelerated. It threw itself at the barrier, hoping to pass through on sheer power and inertia, where other attempts had failed. Reaching 80% of lightspeed before the barrier, the warship rammed. ˝ a billion tons of worldship-sized fury hammered into the barrier.

And was instantly compressed to just 2% of its initial length.

The barrier had held, but the ship had not. When the ship made contact with the barrier simple inertia had decided the rest. The bow of the ship had stopped and everything behind it had continued moving at its previous velocity. A compressed disk of titanium, manganese and various precious metals spun away from the barrier. The disk was 50 metres thick, and nearly 200 wide… and even that much valuable metal was of no interest to the B’aran scout.

Spinning away from the barrier, the scout fled. It sought the safety of the fleet, even as its crew wondered if even there would bring safety from whatever beings had emplaced the barrier. Arriving at the fleet, almost a light-year distant,  it prepared to give a report on what had transpired. Instead, just as the report would have started, a single pure tone was heard by every B’aran. The tone lasted only a few seconds before being replaced by a voice. It was a vaguely male voice, self-assured and gentle… but with the unmistakeable ring of authority. Its message was simple.

“Visitors we would have met, friends we would have welcomed… conquerors we have excluded. You will go now from this place. Do not return until your primitive race has matured.”

As the message started a huge sphere of space, some 65 light-years in radius, slowly darkened then returned to normal visibility. The sphere encompassed perhaps 2 dozen star systems. The intent of the sphere was clear, and its surface corresponded exactly with the known location of the barrier.

As the message ended, the stardrive engines of every B’aran ship quickly built to full power. Frantic efforts by panicked engineers to stop the uncommanded activation proved fruitless. Power built and the engines fired, hurling the fleet into stardrive before even a course could be set.

The fleet emerged from stardrive far from its home sector. Gone was the comforting glow of tightly spaced systems, here the stars were further apart. Study of (now local) space would reveal that the fleet had jumped 3 times further than it should have been able to reach. Furthermore, no fuel had been expended… the fleet was as well provisioned as it had been before the barrier had been found.

The B’aran found themselves in the inner surface of a peripheral spiral arm. Stars here might be further apart, but they also gave every indication of containing a higher percentage of heavy metals. Forage would be good for the B’aran and distance from the mysterious aliens who built the barrier was not an inconsequential bonus. Technologically advanced, and telepathic was something to be avoided at all costs.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2014, 06:33:26 AM by Silver Fox »

Re: Klaatu
« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2014, 03:51:58 PM »
Awesome!

I await.



Chris
"What young man could possibly be bored
with a uniform to wear,
a fast aeroplane to fly,
and something to shoot at?"

Offline Silver Fox

  • Talk to me Goose!
Re: Klaatu
« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2014, 02:38:30 AM »
Part IV: Watchers

*We have set these beings against one of the more promising young races in this galaxy. What if they do not rise to meet the challenge?* The thought-state of the “Watcher” was clear, untinged with emotional content… as was to be expected from an ancient member of an even more ancient race.

The species did not now have a name, if indeed it had ever had one. Individuals were identified by some (indecipherable to most species) combination of gravity potential, space-time bending and quark spin and flavour. If a collective name for the species was ever needed, it was simply “Watcher”, an unusual name for those who did far more than merely observe. * was one of it’s most very ancient members, capable of remembering when Watchers did just observe, and the forecast of their own disappearance which had caused a change of philosophy.

^It is possible that the youngsters will fail, and fall prey to the barbarians, these “B’aran” as they call themselves. I do not see such potentiality as very high. It certainly exists as a no-zero possibility, but the youths are surprising. They have already casually violated the space-time “laws” governing this place… even if they do not know it, or know how. I believe they will survive handily.^

* reflected on the youth apparent, in moments such as these, of his companion ^. ^ was verbose as all such youth are, hoping to hide a lack of confidence behind complex ideas, ignoring that simpler thought-states would express greater confidence and clarity. Indeed, ^ was barely older than that galaxy they now observed. * reflected that things had been so much more… peaceful and quiet during the time before this universe had been born. The change of energy states was invigorating… but sometimes just didn’t seem to be worth the effort required.

*I am aware. You refer to them as youths, those who are barely past infancy… but I acknowledge they are already quite interesting. 27 species in this galaxy with potential, and yet less than the value of pi that are sentient. Only these have developed rudimentary technology. There is risk.*

^ Risk, agreed.^

The Watchers settled to observe events. A bare 2,000 years remained before the B’aran met the youngsters. The time for the exchange of thought-states had passed. The time for observations not quiet yet started. There was a chance for millennia or two of quiet rest, basking in the energy state of the singularity chosen as a vantage point.


Offline GTX_Admin

  • Evil Administrator bent on taking over the Universe!
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Re: Klaatu
« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2014, 04:09:17 AM »
Thoroughly enjoying this.  You should perhaps enter this in the current Space GB
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

You can't outrun Death forever.
But you can make the Bastard work for it.

Offline Silver Fox

  • Talk to me Goose!
Re: Klaatu
« Reply #10 on: February 02, 2014, 06:31:45 AM »
One last piece left... and then the entry in the Space GB. :)

Offline Volkodav

  • Counts rivits with his abacus...
  • Much older now...but procrastinating about it
Re: Klaatu
« Reply #11 on: February 02, 2014, 07:16:36 AM »
Why do I get the feeling that humans / terrans are this youthful race?

Looking forward to the rest, very well imagined and told, keep up he good work.

Offline Silver Fox

  • Talk to me Goose!
Re: Klaatu
« Reply #12 on: February 02, 2014, 08:18:51 AM »
Part V: Calling

The B’aran scout emerged from stardrive just outside the orbit of a distant brown dwarf that had been gravitationally capture by the binary star it was here to scout. Binary stars were especially valuable to the B’aran as the gravitational stresses caused planetary formation to be limited, in favour of more extensive numbers of more easily mined minor bodies.

The scout examined the system and noted the high availability of resources much needed by the B’aran fleet. Fear of space-faring species, or those with telepathy, had limited the chances to provision the fleet. The fleet was now crowded. 12,000 worldships existed, but they contained a staggering 57 billion B’aran. Population density was far from optimum, but there had been no chance to supply or build new worldships.

One major technological advance had been made in the last 2,000 years that had aided the B’aran immensely. They now possessed a limited time-travel capacity. It was limited to approximately 15 years+/-, but even that allowed for expanded opportunity. Mining ships could exploit an asteroid field by jumping back in time, starting mining operations and then have the fleet harvest 15 years of refined metals and valuable organic compounds.

The scout noted that some 4 ˝ light years distant was a technological world. Evidence suggested that the inhabitants had just started to practice spaceflight, although there were some moments of severe anxiety when their visual images showed advanced spacecraft of a type that could easily crush the entire B’aran fleet. The purpose of the images was unknown, was it possible that such a race was on the verge of developing such vessels when they were so unsophisticated at spaceflight now?

The scouts report brought both happiness and concern to the B’aran. The resources were needed so very badly… but the neighbouring world was of great concern. It was determined that mining would begin, as always, as far in the past as the local conditions would allow the mining vessels to jump. Scouts would be deployed at intervals along the time stream, watching for any threat to the fleet. It was a risk, but a calculated one. The B’aran need was so great that chances must be taken. The barrier builders, and other past experience, has scared the B’aran so bad that even the plentiful resources of this spiral arm had gone untouched by the B’aran. Even this system would have gone untouched given the proximity of the technological neighbour, had not need been so great.

The fleet dispersed, scouts and mining vessels jumping in time to take up assigned stations. Time jumps tend to cause fluctuations in the timestream, meaning that the maximum time jump would get smaller and smaller the more jumps that took place from the same locale. For this reason, the scouts assigned to the furthest forward or back jumped first, followed by the mining vessels. Then the rest of the scouts followed, dispersing across local space-time.

Two of the scouts returned immediately, messages had been received from the neighbouring world!

The scout which had received the message from further forward in time started playback of the recorded and translated message. It had been broadcast in the dominant language of the strange world, in clear amongst all the strange broadcasts the world made. A female of the alien species, vocalizing “Calling Occupants of Interplanetary Craft”.

The commander of the second scout interrupted frantically, playing his recorded message. A male, vocalizing in the same dominant language, “Calling Occupants of Interplanetary Craft”.

The messages had been received a year apart. A year? Had the aliens expected a response? Their planet was 4 ˝ light years distant… how could they have expected a response and sent the female, less threatening message?

The B’aran were near panic, had they been found and even now the aliens were preparing for an attack on the weakened fleet? Preparations were made to flee the area, get away from whatever threat the aliens posed.

Then came the final terrifying message. In the same language, but telepathically across the immense distance.

“Calling Occupants of Interplanetary Craft. Calling Occupants of Interplanetary Craft”.


Racial insanity is an ugly thing, but it overtook the B’aran in an instant. Worldships fired on each other and their scoutship consorts. B’aran stalked each other in the hallways and passageways of their ships. The species had been pushed too far, and individuals had gone well past their own breaking points. The idea that the aliens had simultaneously contacted the fleet, across vast distance/time both technologically and using telepathy was intolerable. So the B’aran went mad.

In their insanity the B’aran overlooked the fact that there was no simultaneity. The time-scouts had returned as soon as they were dispatched to be sure… but they could not have come back before they had departed, could they? The telepathic message was more concerning, but random chance would allow for such coincidence. It no longer mattered, the B’aran were doomed by their own fears.

Only on the birthing ship, what the inhabitants of the nearby world would call a maternity ward, was the insanity stopped. The instinct to protect children was more powerful than the insanity gripping the remainder of the species. The B’aran survived as a species, but only the 127,836 individuals aboard the birthing ship remained. Those B’aran were numb, stunned past shock at the event gripping their race. When an infant cried they searched for hours… before finding the cry was the telepathic cry of an unborn child.

The B’aran had “heard” the various telepathic messages because the B’aran were latent telepaths themselves. No individuals had yet shown the ability to transmit… but almost every B’aran could hear. The unborn child had been in just the right point of development when exposed to the telepathic message from afar. Its “transmitter” was now turned on. Future generations would all be able to transmit and hear equally well. For now, a watershed moment in B’aran evolution had been reached.

The birthing ship jumped away, looking for a world to colonize. The B’aran would leave space and the pains it had brought. They would learn to accept the new telepathic ability, and develop a new way of life. In due course they would travel space again, even finding the barrier that had once stopped their long ago relatives. They would be welcomed as visitors, then as friends.

On the world which had sent the messages, life went on. The inhabitants were unaware of the effect they had had on another species, or the threat they had actually been under. 1500 years later they would meet the “B’ran (the language had atrophied with telepathy becoming more prevalent), and a rather timorous friendship began. There would be some confusion and even anger when B’ran scholars studied Earth’s music and discovered the messages that caused so much panic. Eventually, they accepted that there had been no intent, the humans had never even been aware of the B’ran’s ancestors.


*The young ones survived*

^Yes. And the Aggressives have learned peace.^

*You altered circumstance?*

^No. I had meant to, it was not required.^

*What change had you planned?*

^I was planning to alter the density of interstellar particles so the aggressives would arrive just in time for the message from the youths. Densities rose without my input, the aggressives arrived just as they were needed too.^

*Indeed. The aggressives arrived just as the youths were preparing to call to them. We did not do this. It bears study.*

^If it was DONE, and not by us… then who?^

*Yes… who indeed?*

*Paused, there was much to consider here.

*The aggressives arrived just in time to be terrified of the young ones. A threat to the young ones was averted. The young ones are now on the path to a larger future.*

*Who changed reality? Perhaps the answer is in that capacity only they seem to have. They imagine. Perhaps they imagined… and it came into being?*

*^We should observe.*^



The writer sat back from his computer. Had it happened that way? Were the B’aran even now settling on a new world, forever changed? Did it matter? Imagining made it real…

In some sense at least.
« Last Edit: February 02, 2014, 08:23:09 AM by Silver Fox »

Offline Alvis 3.1

  • Self acknowledged "Bad Influence"…but probably less attractive than Pink
  • The high priest of whiffing
Re: Klaatu
« Reply #13 on: February 02, 2014, 10:34:37 AM »
I was worried what was going to happen to Earth when they found us, who would have thought the Carpenters would save us?
 :D

Awesome!
Alvis 3.1

Offline Silver Fox

  • Talk to me Goose!
Re: Klaatu
« Reply #14 on: February 02, 2014, 11:19:34 AM »
Actually, the Carpenters version is a cover of the previous years version done by Klaatu. :)

The telepathic message from Earth would have been "World Contact Day". On that day large numbers of UFO believers concentrate on a single piece of text in hopes that aliens will hear the message. First held in 1953, it is now an annual event.

Text of the World Contact Day message:

"Calling occupants of interplanetary craft! Calling occupants of interplanetary craft that have been observing our planet EARTH. We of IFSB wish to make contact with you. We are your friends, and would like you to make an appearance here on EARTH. Your presence before us will be welcomed with the utmost friendship. We will do all in our power to promote mutual understanding between your people and the people of EARTH. Please come in peace and help us in our EARTHLY problems. Give us some sign that you have received our message. Be responsible for creating a miracle here on our planet to wake up the ignorant ones to reality. Let us hear from you. We are your friends."

Both the Klaatu and Carpenters versions of Calling Occupants tend to be played on that day as well. Conspiracy theorists have the opinion that this is done to add millions of voices to the message. People tend to sing along, not even knowing the story of the song.
« Last Edit: February 02, 2014, 11:35:22 AM by Silver Fox »

Offline Volkodav

  • Counts rivits with his abacus...
  • Much older now...but procrastinating about it
Re: Klaatu
« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2014, 12:36:44 PM »
Very very clever, humanity is saved by accidental genocide!  ;D

Offline mrvr6

  • Accidentally created a Tejas….
Re: Klaatu
« Reply #16 on: February 03, 2014, 03:27:09 AM »
what he said!!

Offline Alvis 3.1

  • Self acknowledged "Bad Influence"…but probably less attractive than Pink
  • The high priest of whiffing
Re: Klaatu
« Reply #17 on: February 05, 2014, 07:01:00 AM »
Duh, of course it is the Klaatu version, hene the title.   :-[

Awesome story!

Alvis 3.1

Offline Silver Fox

  • Talk to me Goose!
Re: Klaatu
« Reply #18 on: February 05, 2014, 08:17:34 AM »
Glad you like it folks!

Love this place! I don't do as much plastic modelling as I used to... here I get to explore my "whiffiness" in a different way. :)

Offline apophenia

  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: Klaatu
« Reply #19 on: February 06, 2014, 04:53:12 AM »
Great stuff! I thoroughly enjoyed this  :)

Actually, the Carpenters version is a cover of the previous years version done by Klaatu. :)

Yeah, but what effect would the Babes in Toyland cover have on interplantary relations?  :D
The doorbell's ringing, could be the elves
But it's probably the werewolf ...

Offline deathjester

  • 'Remember - Tiredness Kills Hedgehogs...!'
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    • stormfront models
Re: Klaatu
« Reply #20 on: July 04, 2014, 03:43:44 AM »
AWESOME!  Still think you should publish these!  Well done!!

Re: Klaatu
« Reply #21 on: November 15, 2021, 06:17:50 AM »
This story just popped into my head last night, but I couldn't remember where it was from. This morning, I remembered again, so I've been searching through the various forums on my like list. As I couldn't remember the proper title, it's taken me awhile to find it.

The ol' brain sure works weirdly as you age.



Chris
"What young man could possibly be bored
with a uniform to wear,
a fast aeroplane to fly,
and something to shoot at?"