Author Topic: The Yak-13 Fragger - a small corner of the Korean conflict in 1/72 scale  (Read 3505 times)

Offline Brian da Basher

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The late 1940's were a time of incredible progress in aircraft development. Many nations sought to upgrade their fighters by using jet propulsion. The Soviet Union was no different and while the MiG-15 has become iconic, utterly forgotten is its also-ran competitor, the Yakovlev 13.



The Yak-13 had a large fuselage due to the Klomov VI jet engine's unquenechable thirst for fuel. As the engine could burn either kerosene or alcohol, the enormous tankange was seen as being useful for parties as well as combat.



After being rejected by the Soviet Red Air Force, the Yakovlev bureau was told to try palming their crate off on the Communist satellite countries. "Those losers will buy anything!" Stalin said, rubbing his hands together greedily in anticipation of the profits.



The tiny rump state of the Democratic Peoples' Commie Republic of Yalu was the first to purchase the large new jet to modernize their air force. The Yakovlevs arrived just in time for the small nation to join the Democratic Peoples' Republic of Korea fighting against the U.S.-led U.N. onslaught.



The miniscule Democratic Peoples' Republic of Yalu air force had a negligible effect on the conflict and U.S. F-86 pilots were far from impressed by the ungainly flight characteristics of the large Yakovlev 13s.



Typically, the Democratic Peoples' Republic of Yalu Yak-13s would flee at high speed at the mere sight of F-86 Sabres and actual air-to-air combat between the two jets was practically non-existent. Except for one pilot, this aircraft would be remain unknown today.



Pilot Corporal Kim Chee Chow was in the first class of pilots to transition to the new Yak-13 fighter. He was aggressive with a hunter's instinct and greatly appreciated the Yak-13's modified extra-wide cockpit as well as its heavy armament of one 28 mm and one 47 mm auto-cannon. Unfortunately, he aimed these weapons at the wrong targets



Kim Chee Chow became famous for achieving the incredible feat of becoming a "reverse ace" in a day when he destroyed three DPCRY air force Il-10s and two North Korean Yak-9s. He finished the mission by strafing a commie supply column. The next day, Kim continued on his path of destruction by wiping out friendly anti-aircraft positions and decimating a North Korean combat engineer battalion before shooting down a red Chinese Li-2 VIP transport.



Pilot Corporal Kim Chee Chow's "victory" rolls became a common sight in the skies above the North Korean border and the Democratic Peoples' Commie Republic of Yalu was eventually forced to call up an additional class of inductees to make up for the carnage.



Kim Chee Chow was only able to get away with this because his uncle was air force commander Comrade Air Marshal Kim Chong Chow and son-in-law of the Democratic Peoples' Commie Republic of Yalu founder, Kim Dong Hung who could rightly be said to be the father of the country.



Eventually, the fragging ended when Pilot Corporal Kim Chee Chow was promoted to Second Sergeant and kicked upstairs to the DPCRY's Catering Corps where a donut shortage was only made worse by his presence.



Still, for one brief moment, the Yak-13 Fragger was an impressive and intimidating sight in the Korean conflict, especially to those fighting under the communist banner.

Brian da Basher
« Last Edit: September 18, 2016, 12:59:55 AM by Brian da Basher »

Offline Brian da Basher

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Re: The Yak-13 Fragger - a small corner of the Korean conflict in 1/72 scale
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2016, 11:50:09 PM »
This all began with the fuselage from the venerable Minicraft 1/144 Douglas C-118 (DC-6) Independence. Doesn't that evocative box art just hit you right where you live? Few things could better convey the wonder of flight.



Of course, a few extra parts would be needed.



The wings came in a large box of miscellaneous parts Frank sent me a long time ago (thanks a million, amigo!). Those more knowledgeable told me the wings are apparently from a 1/48 F-86 which makes this project even more satisfying. Of course, some minor surgery would be required.



Not only to the nose, but to the tail as well.



The nose intake was perhaps the most challenging part of this build. I used a large, old cast-off wheel as a backing for the shock cone and splitter plate which were conveniently combined as one nameless part (possibly the tail end of a bomb).



Another large, cast-off wheel was used to top off the new intake.



Another nameless part was used for the burner can.



The tail feathers were from a 1/144 737 and the canopy is from a 1/72 Mosquito. Here's how it all looked before it went to the paint shop.











Here's one more bonus shot of that burner can.



The model was finished using the tried-and-true old hairy stick and acrylic paint, Polly Scale Undercoat Gray mostly. The canopy was tinted in Gloss Black with a top coat of Liquitex Artists Gloss Medium for extra shine.



Decals were mostly Roundels of the World Spanish markings (thanks, Jeff!) with Soviet red stars added. The fuselage codes were swiped from a Soviet Vultee V-11 and the nose markings were from a sheet of Belgian decals.



It took me a week and change to build this model, but I had to wait to post it as things have been busy for me lately.



I hope you enjoyed the Yak-13 Fragger and reading about "reverse ace" Kim Chee Chow and more forgotten aircraft history.

Brian da Basher


« Last Edit: September 17, 2016, 11:57:58 PM by Brian da Basher »

Offline Kerick

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Re: The Yak-13 Fragger - a small corner of the Korean conflict in 1/72 scale
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2016, 01:19:14 AM »
You can build anything out of anything!!
Well done and hilarious story too !!!!!

Offline Frank3k

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Re: The Yak-13 Fragger - a small corner of the Korean conflict in 1/72 scale
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2016, 01:27:59 AM »
Great job, Brian! The donor parts are unrecognizable. I think the wings are from a 1/72 Testors B-66. The shock cone looks like the intake of an Airfix Il-28.

One problem, though - I think the founder of the Democratic Peoples' Commie Republic of Yalu was Wanlong Wang, not Kim Dong Hung.

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: The Yak-13 Fragger - a small corner of the Korean conflict in 1/72 scale
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2016, 04:12:11 AM »
 :)
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

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But you can make the Bastard work for it.

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: The Yak-13 Fragger - a small corner of the Korean conflict in 1/72 scale
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2016, 04:13:16 AM »
One problem, though - I think the founder of the Democratic Peoples' Commie Republic of Yalu was Wanlong Wang, not Kim Dong Hung.

History is ...err...um...'fluid' in the Democratic Peoples' Commie Republic of Yalu.
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

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But you can make the Bastard work for it.

Offline The Big Gimper

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Re: The Yak-13 Fragger - a small corner of the Korean conflict in 1/72 scale
« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2016, 05:46:36 AM »
Now that I know from whom my favourite Korean cabbage dish Kim Chee is named after, I'm not so interested in it anymore.  ;)

Your awesome PS talent never ceases to amaze me Brian.
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Offline finsrin

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Re: The Yak-13 Fragger - a small corner of the Korean conflict in 1/72 scale
« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2016, 10:52:37 AM »
Mosquito canopy conveys the cockpit width that Kim Chee Chow was pleased with.  Excellent choice. :)
Is first time I heard of a reverse ace.
Found it most interesting to learn family line back to father of Democratic Peoples' Republic of Yalu.

Offline Tophe

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Re: The Yak-13 Fragger - a small corner of the Korean conflict in 1/72 scale
« Reply #8 on: September 18, 2016, 06:19:19 PM »
Wow! Getting a "very-possible aircraft" result from such an impossible basis is outstanding! ;)

Offline AXOR

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Re: The Yak-13 Fragger - a small corner of the Korean conflict in 1/72 scale
« Reply #9 on: September 19, 2016, 06:15:40 PM »
 :)
Alex

Offline Alvis 3.1

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Re: The Yak-13 Fragger - a small corner of the Korean conflict in 1/72 scale
« Reply #10 on: September 20, 2016, 01:13:11 AM »
 ;D :o ;)

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Offline Weaver

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Re: The Yak-13 Fragger - a small corner of the Korean conflict in 1/72 scale
« Reply #11 on: September 25, 2016, 06:17:11 AM »
Splendid stuf Brian. I utterly failed to identify any of the parts (well it is an airliner... ;)) .
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