Author Topic: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby  (Read 12633 times)

Offline apophenia

  • Suffered two full days of rapid-fire hallucinations and yet had not a single usuable whif concept in the lot !?!
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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #30 on: June 11, 2014, 03:05:24 AM »
Old Wombat: Late-war BPF with Aussie reco markings sounds good. Not so sure about the stinger arrestor hook, though.

RN aircraft were still mostly using A-frames until war's end -- eg: Barracuda, Firefly, Sea Hornet, etc. Even the early-production Seafire XVs had A-frame arrestor hooks.

Also, A-frame hooks were attached to the bottom longerons. Makes for pretty simple 'navalization' of an airframe with a steel-tube fuselage frame.
Under investigation by the Committee of State Sanctioned Modelling, Alternative History and Tractor Carburettor Production for decadent counterrevolutionary behaviour.

Offline apophenia

  • Suffered two full days of rapid-fire hallucinations and yet had not a single usuable whif concept in the lot !?!
  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #31 on: June 11, 2014, 03:07:56 AM »
'Super Boomer' - Part 9 - The Commonwealth Aircraft CA-19 Wirga trainer

The Commonwealth CA-19 combined features of the CA-14A and the Wirraway trainer (which the CA-19 was intended to replace). In design, the CA-19 followed the concept of the Wallaby -- adapting the Fw 190 wing and main undercarriage to the trainer's welded steel tube fuselage structure.

The projected powerplant for the CA-19 was CAC's R-1000, a fan-cooled 7-cylinder radial (which was, essentially, the 'font half' of the CAC R-2000. Thanks to its higher compression ratio,* the R-1000 was expected to deliver 650 hp on 87 octane fuel (versus 600 hp for the Wirrway's R-1340 S3H1-G). For CA-19 armaments trainers, it was proposed that the CA-14A's armoured cowling ring be retained.**

In one structural detail, the CA-19 differed from both the Wirraway series and the Wallaby. The steel-tube fuselage structure was to be covered in light alloy rather than fabric (as was the Wirraway) or plywood (as per the Wallaby). Thus, the CA-19 fuselage had more in common with the US-built AT-6 Texan than with its Australian predecessors. The CA-19 empennage was unique to the type -- although obviously based upon the CA-14A tailplane.

In the initial CA-19 concept, both front and rear cockpit canopies were similar to that of the sliding hoods of the Wallaby Mk.X. After much debate, it was decided that the CA-19 would feature a framed canopy based on that of the Wirrway. The CA-19's windscreen was also based on that of the Wirraway, albeit, reshaped to suit a revised forward upper decking design.

The CA-19 dispensed with the Wirraway's synchronized forward-firing guns. In their place, the CA-19 would retain the outboard wing gun positions of the CA-14A. It was envisioned that basic trainer versions would have one (or two) 0.303" Browning guns. Armaments trainers would have two 0.50" Brownings (with optional wing racks) or twin AC-20 cannons.

CAC dubbed the CA-19 project the 'Nulla-nulla' (the Dharuk Aboriginal word for a Fighting Stick) and proposed that the RAAF adopt that name. AFHQ in Canberra disapproved this hyphenated name. In its place was substituted Wirga, a small nulla-nulla in the Wargamay language. Thus the CA-19 was ordered into production for the RAAF as the Wirga T.Mk.I. Unfortunately for CAC, this RAAF order was cancelled in late August 1945 -- before the prototype Wirga had even flown.

[To be continued]
_________________________________

* R-1000 compression ratio was from 6.5:1 to 6.75:1. The Wirrway's R-1340 S3H1-G was 6:1.

** Presumably, the armoured cowling ring was to allow for the possibility of the CA-19 being pressed into emergency combat service as had happened to the CA-2 Wirraway.
_________________________________
Under investigation by the Committee of State Sanctioned Modelling, Alternative History and Tractor Carburettor Production for decadent counterrevolutionary behaviour.

Offline apophenia

  • Suffered two full days of rapid-fire hallucinations and yet had not a single usuable whif concept in the lot !?!
  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #32 on: June 11, 2014, 03:11:28 AM »
'Super Boomer' - Part 10 - The Commonwealth Aircraft CA-19 Wirga trainer

CAC 's prototype CA-19 Wirga T.Mk.I first flew in late Jan 1946. Compared with the CA-14A Wallaby fighter, the CA-19 had a longer span wing. The CA-14A's wing panels had joined on the centre line. But the CA-19 featured a new centre section to which the outer wing panels were joined. This gave the Wirga a wing span of 36 ft 1 in versus 34 ft 5 in for the Wallaby.

Following the pattern of the Wallaby, the Wirga was assigned 'recycled' RAAF serials. The A69 sequence up to -150 had been for the Curtiss A-25 Shrike but these orders were cancelled. Thus, the serial sequence for the CA-19 Wirga trainers began with A69-151.

A69-151 flew with a hand-built prototype CAC R-1000 7-cylinder radial. The CA-19 flew much as expected but, as previously recounted, the RAAF had already cancelled its orders for the Wirga T.Mk.I series. As a result, A69-151 was re-engined with a CAC-built Pratt & Whitney R-1340 S3H1-G Wasp 9-cylinder radial to become the prototype CA-19 Wirga T.Mk.II. Using stockpiled stocks of these Wirrway engines, Wirga T.Mk.I components already begun at Fisherman's Bend were completed as Wirga T.Mk.II armaments trainers -- T.Mk.IIAs with 0.50" guns, T.Mk.IIBs with wing racks, and T.Mk.IICs with AC-20 cannons.

In the postwar environment, surplus AT-6 Texan components were available very cheaply. To take advantage of this windfall, Canberra ordered stocks of 600 hp P&W R-1340-AN1 (S1H1) Wasp radials from the US along with AT-6 engine bearers, cowlings, and two-blade Hamilton Standard propellers. These ex-USAAF components were incorporated into the next Wirga variant, the T.Mk.IIIA. All of these aircraft were gunnery trainers fitted with twin AC-20 cannons in their wings.

CAC had made several attempts to develop an improved canopy for the Wirga. Late model T.Mk.IIs and the T.Mk.III featured Wirraway-style canopies with reduced framing. But none of CAC's 'bubble' canopies had been acceptable to the RAAF -- mostly because of projected costs. In 1949, a new option became available -- adapting the canopy from North American's new T-28 Trojan trainer to the cockpit of the CA-19 Wirga. This concept was acceptable to the RAAF and CAC began delivering Wirga T.Mk.IVs fitted with North American-supplied canopies in 1951.

The final model of Wirga was the T.Mk.V, basically T.Mk.IIIs remanufactured to T.Mk.IV standard. As these aircraft entered RAAF service, they displaced earlier model Wirgas which, in turn, eclipsed the Wirraway in the target-towing role. Beginning in 1955, the more economical CAC CA-25 Winjeel began replacing the CA-19s. The Wirga T.Mk.IVs and T.Mk.Vs continued on as armaments trainers until 1959.

[Fin]
Under investigation by the Committee of State Sanctioned Modelling, Alternative History and Tractor Carburettor Production for decadent counterrevolutionary behaviour.

Offline apophenia

  • Suffered two full days of rapid-fire hallucinations and yet had not a single usuable whif concept in the lot !?!
  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #33 on: June 17, 2014, 08:48:27 AM »
Blame this on Old Wombat ...

'Super Boomer' - Part 11 - Royal Australian Navy Air Wing in WWII

The air wing of the Royal Australian Navy was re-formed in late 1943 to operate shipboard aircraft -- both catapult observation types and potential carrier operation. Numbering of naval aircraft was addressed by adding the RAN's old ANA (Australian Naval Aeroplane) prefix on to RAAF serials.

The RAAF was responsible for basic training but RAN performed both carrier deck and catapult training using ex-RAAF Avro Cadets. Two 643 Cadets (ANA6-6 and ANA6-9) were fitted with floats for catapult training. Another pair of Cadets (ANA6-13 and ANA6-14)* were equipped with arrestor gear for simulated deck landings.

Prior to the establishment of RAN training, the Navy had taken over operation of the RAAF's Fleet Cooperation Unit, No.9 Squadron. With crews comprised of seconded RAAF personnel, No.9 Sqn operated  Supermarine Seagulls as catapult aircraft aboard surviving RAN light cruisers, HMAS Australia and (when she returned to service in 1945) HMAS Hobart. RAN Seagulls also flew land-based coastal patrols on behalf of the RAAF.

The first RAN fighter aircraft were Brewster Buffalos courtesy of the US Army Air Force. The Buffalos were ex-RAAF aircraft returned to the USAAF at Eagle Farm, QLD. The initial plan was to fit the Buffalos With arrestor hooks to act as occupational conversion trainers. But these aircraft were land-based Brewster 339Ds and naval gear for Buffalos proved difficult to find by the summer of 1943. Instead, the 'land lubber' Buffalos were assigned to what became the RAN's Fighter Opponent Training (FOT) unit.

The Navy's FOT unit was formed at Eagle Farm Airfield at Meeandah (just outside of Brisbane), sharing the field with the US Army Air Force. Inevitably, the RAN Buffalos became the main sparring partner for local USAAF fighters -- with the portly 'Billy'** simulating Japanese opponents. The FOT later developed into detachments stationed at various RAN airfields (Eagle Farm becoming FOT Det 4).

By the middle of 1944, few of the surviving RAN Buffalos could be made airworthy. In Sept 1944, the RAN began receiving ex-RAAF Boomerang Mk.Is to replace the 'Billy' fighter-trainer. The RAN's first combat fighter was the navalized CA-14A Wallaby. The first were converted Wallaby Mk.VIs with arrestor gear and catapult spools added.

[To be continued]
____________________________________

* ANA6-13 was written off in a simulated deck landing accident. Another RAAF Cadet (A6-33) was then 'hooked' as replacement, ANA6-33.

** With its obvious allusion to a warm brew, a teapot reference was probably inevitable. Former RAAF Buffalos in RAN service were A51-3, '7, '9-to-'16, and A51-16 (A51-1, '8 and '17 had all been reduced to spares to support the RAN Buffalo fleet).

NB: RAN Buffalo sideview was modified from an RAAF Buffalo profile by Pierre-Andre Tilley.
Under investigation by the Committee of State Sanctioned Modelling, Alternative History and Tractor Carburettor Production for decadent counterrevolutionary behaviour.

Offline apophenia

  • Suffered two full days of rapid-fire hallucinations and yet had not a single usuable whif concept in the lot !?!
  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #34 on: June 17, 2014, 08:51:28 AM »
'Super Boomer' - Part 12 - CA-14 Wallaby Fighters for the RAN

Navalization of Wallaby fighters was a production line modification performed before delivery at the Commonwealth Aircraft Company's Fisherman's Bend plant.

'Bounce' was a navalized Wallaby Mk.XA* of the Royal Australian Navy. This aircraft belonged to the RAN's Fighter Opponent Training unit. By 1945, FOT Det 4 was offically assigned to train American pilots of the US Seventh Fleet, so 'Bounce' had been repainted in a standard, late-war US Navy fighter scheme.

Features to accommodate operations with the USN included the use of an AN/ARC-5 radio 'command set' and Bell & Howell 16mm gun camera (replacing the outboard armament). Due to the USN connection, RAN roundels were used with added US-style 'bars' and standard RAN white recognition markings. A light insignia grey '44' on the nose shows that 'Bounce' was FOT Det 4's fourth aircraft. A local distinction was sky blue trim on the tail intended to change the rudder's outline to resemble that of the Japanese Zero fighter.**

_________________________________

* As FOT aircraft, Wallaby Mk.XAs were armed only with cowl-mounted 0.50" Browning guns for self-defence. The Wallaby wing-root gun positions were blanked off. Most FOT aircraft had their outer starboard gun ports blocked off as well (although some carried a 16mm gun camera in each wing).

** Earlier, a captured Zero had been test flown from Eagle Farm against USAAF fighters. An airworthy Ki.43 was also assembled there from the remains of three captured examples.
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Offline uncle les

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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #35 on: June 17, 2014, 01:38:03 PM »
Inspiring.
Just wonderful vision on that, I agree with Logan.. it really does look more right than it should
Time until somebody builds one.. 10...9...8...
Les.. are you out there ?

hmmm....   I appear to have missed this when it happened - but I'm across it now..  and I like it.  ( Shout louder next time Brian )  the Wallaby was in actuality the name given to a feeder liner proposal ( For which I have the great privilege of possessing an original brochure with GA drawings n'all - when I'm home I'll dig it out for academic interest - meanwhile http://www.airwaysmuseum.com/CAC%20Wallaby.htm  gives you an idea ) but the concept presented here predates that and I think I prefer this single engined fighter concept to be a "Wallaby" rather than the twin engined regional airliner.

Nevertheless, excellent background story there and I think I have enough raw materials to have a go at something like this in 1/32..  like I need an excuse !!  ;)

Nicely done Apophenia.. nicely done !  :)
« Last Edit: June 17, 2014, 08:00:36 PM by uncle les »

Offline Old Wombat

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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #36 on: June 17, 2014, 09:10:07 PM »
I feel exceptionally honoured to be blamed for this! 8)
"This is the Captain. We have a little problem with our engine sequence, so we may experience some slight turbulence and, ah, explode."

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #37 on: June 18, 2014, 03:17:11 AM »
Wow!!!  I love those last two.
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

Offline uncle les

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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #38 on: October 27, 2014, 08:32:49 PM »
Ooh look what appeared after reading this thread !
http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4856.0

Offline KiwiZac

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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #39 on: June 17, 2016, 11:07:10 AM »
I'm rather behind on seeing all this...wow, Apophenia, WOW!!! Bravo! A fantastic history and some stunning profile work.

I have previously-built Harvards and 190s going spare...those Wirgas are looking very attractive...
"He's more real-world now than whif..."

Offline apophenia

  • Suffered two full days of rapid-fire hallucinations and yet had not a single usuable whif concept in the lot !?!
  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #40 on: June 23, 2016, 04:20:54 AM »
Many thanks 'Zac! I'd love to see the Wirga in polystyrene ... especially the T.Mk.IV  :)
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Offline uncle les

  • Aussie Whiffer Extraordinaire!
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Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #41 on: June 24, 2016, 08:19:01 AM »
I see the links on my pics broke so I reloaded using pics from my own website.  More here: http://beyondthesprues.com/Forum/index.php?topic=4856.15

Offline KiwiZac

  • Who said Kiwis can't fly...though this one can organise for a kit of the Fletcher FU24 to be produced!
  • The Modeller Formerly Known As K5054NZ
Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #42 on: July 01, 2016, 05:20:48 AM »
Top job Les! What a looker!

Apo - what donor airframes and bits do you suggest for building a Wirga T.Mk.IV in 1/72?
"He's more real-world now than whif..."

Offline apophenia

  • Suffered two full days of rapid-fire hallucinations and yet had not a single usuable whif concept in the lot !?!
  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #43 on: July 01, 2016, 11:34:56 AM »

'Zac: For the Wirga T.Mk.IV, you'd need a Harvard/Texan for the fuselage + empennage + cowl/prop, a Fw 190 for the wings + main undercarriage, and a Trojan/Fennec for the cockpit framing/canopy.

Were I bold enough to try it, I think I'd try to blend the Fw 190's lower fuselage into the Harvard upper. More PSR maybe but less fuss than building up the wing fillets, I'd guess.

An alternative to a Trojan/Fennec kit would be the vacuform canopy (72003) from Rob-Taurus  http://www.rob-taurus.cz/

Looking forward to seeing the Wirga built!  :)
Under investigation by the Committee of State Sanctioned Modelling, Alternative History and Tractor Carburettor Production for decadent counterrevolutionary behaviour.

Offline KiwiZac

  • Who said Kiwis can't fly...though this one can organise for a kit of the Fletcher FU24 to be produced!
  • The Modeller Formerly Known As K5054NZ
Re: 'Super Boomer' - CAC CA-14 Wallaby
« Reply #44 on: July 02, 2016, 02:49:49 PM »
Well, as it happens I have examples of each of those three already built to use as spares sources. I'll keep you posted!
"He's more real-world now than whif..."