Author Topic: 3D Printers  (Read 13768 times)

Offline nils

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Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #15 on: December 02, 2013, 04:42:00 PM »
3D printing is one thing i have concidered quite a few times.
but current printers are quite expensive (between 900 and 1500 Euro's for the pre-assembled ones).
but the concept of 3D printing is fairly new, and there are still some problems with resolution, not to mention that the printing process is still very slow (up to 3 to 6 hours, depending on the size of the part).

3D  printing could be usefull for pringing out parts that are to complex to scratchbuild.
for exsample the nose and tailsections of a Nimrod AEW.3, or engine cowlings for a C-130.

looking at the toner/ASB fibre used, it is in some cases cheaper then moulding resin.

i read earlier this week that HP is developing a household 3D printer that would be more affordable and practical.
however, you still need to learn how to use 3D CAD/CAM design software.

all i can say and do, is wait and see what comes up  8)
on the bench:
-various models

on the drawing board:
-various 1/72 TinTin aircraft
-1/72 Eurocopter Tiger (Belgian Army)
-various other 1/72 and 1/144 aircraft

Offline Volkodav

  • Counts rivits with his abacus...
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Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #16 on: January 01, 2014, 11:13:14 AM »
A very interesting comparison of some of the printers currently available
http://www.gizmag.com/2013-3d-printer-comparison-guide/30187/


All I can say is I am glad I am alive in this day and age

http://www.gizmag.com/spike-laser-measurement-smartphone/30218/

Being able to transfer this data to 3D modelling software automatically hence scaling and printing....... ;D
« Last Edit: January 01, 2014, 11:15:28 AM by Volkodav »

Offline Weaver

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Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #17 on: March 16, 2014, 04:02:26 AM »


 ;D
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Offline Morgeorge

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Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #18 on: June 05, 2014, 05:31:36 PM »
I bought my Felix printer last year; and I choose it over Makerbot because it has a bigger print bed size which is 255x205x235mm. For some odd reason, I prefer large scale print bed and high resistance filament like 3D2printís nylon filament than plastic PLA to create prototypes. Donít have yet a 3D printer? Then I guess you can ask for 3D printer services like Thingverse and Shapeways to do your favour.

Offline Jeffry Fontaine

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Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #19 on: June 05, 2014, 06:56:03 PM »
I bought my Felix printer last year; and I choose it over Makerbot because it has a bigger print bed size which is 255x205x235mm. For some odd reason, I prefer large scale print bed and high resistance filament like 3D2printís nylon filament than plastic PLA to create prototypes.
Hi George,

Does the nylon media have a rough finish?  Can you sand it to smooth out the surface of the printed object if it does have a rough finish?
"Every day we hear about new studies 'revealing' what should have been obvious to sentient beings for generations; 'Research shows wolverines don't like to be teased" -- Jonah Goldberg

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #20 on: July 12, 2014, 07:12:06 AM »
An interesting review of some click2detail products and the potential for 3D printing and our hobby:

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Offline Volkodav

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Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #21 on: July 12, 2014, 07:05:54 PM »
Very interesting model but boy does that bloke like the sound of his own voice.

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #22 on: July 13, 2014, 02:47:46 AM »
Didn't worry me.
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Offline Frank3k

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Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #23 on: July 13, 2014, 03:55:24 AM »
Very interesting model but boy does that bloke like the sound of his own voice.

I thought the same thing.

It looks like Click2Detail is using an Polyjet printer (same as Shapeways at their highest quality) although they seem to be running them closer to the design limits. Getting a smooth surface from a Polyjet is easy - as long as the areas with printing artifacts are accessible. I was cringing at the way he was handling that model. The resin used by the Polyjet printers (and most high res printers) feels very solid but it will break very easily.

If you want ultra smooth surfaces or very fine details you need a Viper, InVision or Perfactory printer... but now you're talking prices that are higher than even Click2Details inflated prices.

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #24 on: July 17, 2014, 04:16:24 AM »
folks,

Whilst not related to models per sae, the following two stories give you an insight of how this technology is moving in the real world:

GE makes additive manufacturing announcement at Farnborough airshow

Optomec Awarded $4M Project From America Makes To Implement Metal 3D Printing For U.S. Air Force Repair Applications
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Offline Jeffry Fontaine

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Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #25 on: December 09, 2014, 04:36:00 AM »
"Every day we hear about new studies 'revealing' what should have been obvious to sentient beings for generations; 'Research shows wolverines don't like to be teased" -- Jonah Goldberg

Offline kitnut617

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Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #26 on: December 09, 2014, 05:21:24 AM »
I think I'm getting confused as to how these things work.  I thought they were like a computer run milling machine, but this seems to be something a bit different. 

Offline Frank3k

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Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #27 on: December 09, 2014, 07:15:13 AM »
I think I'm getting confused as to how these things work.  I thought they were like a computer run milling machine, but this seems to be something a bit different.

They're completely different. A 3D milling machine removes material, while 3D printers add.

There are 3D printers that can print directly in metal or other non-plastic materials, but let's focus on the printers within hobbyist reach:

Most of the cheap low end printers (like the Dremel, above) are extrusion printers (FDM - fused deposition modeling) and typically use a thermoplastic material (like ABS) heated in a nozzle. The printer deposits layers of molten plastic to build up the model. The results will usually have noticeable steps that will require effort to remove or conceal.

Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) fires a laser into an easily melted powder, like nylon. The small particles stick together, layer by layer, until the model is completed. The results have a grainy finish. You cannot sand the model to eliminate the graininess, because it's grainy all the way through. The particles are just stuck together. You can soak it in paint or primer and sand that.

Color printing can be done with a plaster-like powder and special inkjet heads (Powder bed Printing). The result is grainy (like plaster) and fragile, but you can get a nice color representation.

Stereolithography fires a laser (usually UV, but not always) into a vat of photosensitive resin. The model is built up layer by layer. Stereolithography has the advantage of extremely high resolution and many models will require little if any post processing.


Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #28 on: December 18, 2014, 02:50:35 AM »
Nice summary Frank. :)

Give it a few more years and I am sure you will see the price of these come down and the resolution etc go up.

As for the industrial level, there is a lot happening, especially with metals such as titanium.  Some of the techniques are SLS.  Others use electron beams and wire fed.  Platforms such as the 787 and F-35 will have these parts.
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Offline Volkodav

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Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #29 on: December 18, 2014, 12:22:43 PM »
Nice summary Frank. :)

Give it a few more years and I am sure you will see the price of these come down and the resolution etc go up.

As for the industrial level, there is a lot happening, especially with metals such as titanium.  Some of the techniques are SLS.  Others use electron beams and wire fed.  Platforms such as the 787 and F-35 will have these parts.

Yes its very exciting, I particularly like the suggestion that large industrial 3D printers could be embarked on board the USNs carriers which could then manufacture parts, consumables, even ordinance and complete UCAVs as required.  The materials needed by the printers would take up less volume than the actual spares etc. currently carried.