Author Topic: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken  (Read 75677 times)

Sentinel Chicken

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The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« on: December 16, 2011, 05:10:43 AM »
I thought I'd start a thread here in this section where I'll put my profile art (and repost past stuff as well). But let's start off with a sneak peek at something real world I'm real proud of:



I have a love for military adaptations of commercial jets and yes, I know that the KC-135 family isn't an adaptation of a commercial jet as it has its own design lineage, but it's close enough for me and growing up near an ANG tanker base, the take offs of KC-135As and KC-135Es was the closest I was going to living the glory that was the Boeing 707 and 720.

This sneak preview is of a print that's been two and a half years in the making. And it will be showing the RC-135V/W Rivet Joint in its latest configuration in terms of antenna placement and modifications. How accurate? I've had the distinct pleasure of having the help of engineers at L-3 who are doing the actual upgrade work on the Rivet Joint fleet. With the cooperation of the USAF,  they have been an incredible resource on latest Rivet Joint configuration.

This will also be the start of a whole series of prints that focus on the KC-135 family of aircraft.

I've already done the E-6A/B Mercury as well as SAM 26000 and have plans for more aircraft in this family. Things like the E-3 Sentry, the RAAF Wedgetail, the P-8A Poseidon, the KC-10 Extender, and so on. But the Rivet Joint and the RC-135 family of aircraft like Rivet Amber, Cobra Ball, Cobra Eye, Rivet Brass, and more. All the lumps, bumps, fairings, ports and antennas, they're such unique aircraft that I've always liked for their highly specialized functions and how they're constantly being upgraded and modified to keep up with modern threats.

On each side will be the tails of the rest of the Rivet Joint fleet. The main image will be the first RC-135V/W upgraded to the latest system standard, called Baseline 9. Each successive ELINT/systems upgrade to the Rivet Joint fleet were called "Baseline". Most artwork that I've seen of the Rivet Joint depicts them in Baseline 7 or Baseline 7.5 configuration. I'll post an image of the whole print soon.

Next on the docks in this series will be the RC-135U Combat Sent which is also getting upgraded at L-3's facility at Majors Field in Greenville, Texas. There are only two in the USAF fleet.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2011, 12:18:29 PM by Sentinel Chicken »

Sentinel Chicken

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2011, 05:16:14 AM »
This was a set of three Q400s I did-








Northwest or its regional partners never operated the Q400, but it's my damn reality ;)

Sentinel Chicken

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2011, 05:17:27 AM »


Here's one I always wanted to see after reading about United Express's BAe-146s having better engine out margins out of high mountain airports like Aspen compared to their twin engined replacements. For Frontier, they called their CV-580s the "Mountain Master", suppose the 146 becomes their new "Mountain Master"?

Offline BadersBusCompany

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #3 on: December 16, 2011, 05:30:50 AM »
As ever stunning profiles :-[
Driving trains when I'd rather be drawing planes!!

Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2011, 06:08:41 AM »
As ever stunning profiles

Indeed! The Rivet Joint is spectacular!

Offline Maverick

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2011, 07:12:59 AM »
Agree wholeheartedly.

Regards,

John
Regards,

John

Sentinel Chicken

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #6 on: December 16, 2011, 07:24:41 AM »


I'd always wondered what Republic's "Herman" colors would have looked like on the BAe-146. Seeing as to how the only BAe-146 operator in Republic's early home of Wisconsin was Air Wisconsin, suppose Republic picked up some BAe-146-200s in competition with Air Wisconsin before "Air Whiskey" became a United Express affiliate?

Offline Scooterman

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2011, 10:31:11 AM »
Where's that Guardrail, JP?  ???   C'mon man, been waiting for that one ever since you spilled the beans on it.

Offline sotoolslinger

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #8 on: December 16, 2011, 01:11:12 PM »
I deny Sentinel Chicken's reality and substitute one of my ...shoot... there is no substitute  :in-love:

Offline Brian da Basher

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2011, 06:02:52 AM »
Your work never fails to impress me, Mr. Chicken.

That old Northwest scheme is rendered to perfection!

Brian da Basher

Offline jcf

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2011, 03:32:10 PM »
J.P. it is so great to once again be able to see your work on a regular basis.
Love me some civil schemes.
 :in-love:
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Offline taiidantomcat

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #11 on: December 22, 2011, 11:21:18 AM »
Great work! I love seeing all the -135s incredible amount of variations. Are you going to do or have you done any Cobra Ball Aircraft? (sorry I can't remember)
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Sentinel Chicken

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #12 on: December 24, 2011, 01:40:34 PM »


When I first saw Republic's final livery (the so-called "Mary Tyler Moore" scheme due to the font style in the titles), I had to scratch my head. But I guess it sorta makes sense, given that by 1981 with the acquisition of Hughes Airwest that Republic served more US destinations than any other US airline, even if it was for a brief time. A change into a more "sedate" livery coincided with Stephen Wolf's arrival at the helm of Republic. And those of you versed in airline history should be quite familiar with why Stephen Wolf's name is so infamous in the industry.

His tenure at Republic started on a high note and he began to transform Republic to a more business-like and national carrier, shedding (some say regrettably) its regional roots and the iconic Herman the Mallard Duck logo.

If I was going to wonder what the iconic Republic livery would look like on the 146, might as well toss up the final colors as well, maybe as bit of a swansong to a memorable airline for me personally.

Sentinel Chicken

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #13 on: December 24, 2011, 01:46:21 PM »
More reposts:

Now time for something a little different but vaguely familiar......

Suppose the A-7 Corsair soldiered on longer with the USAF beyond its real-world retirement in the early 1990s? Most of the colors that USAF A-7Ds wore were dark colors indicative of its ground attack role in a high air threat environment- the darker colors reduced the aircraft's visibility against the ground to an attacking fighter pilot....or so I'm to understand. It wasn't until the final two tone gray ANG wrap around colors did the A-7D have colors that reflected more a ground based anti-air threat. Basically the same reasoning that saw the A-10 change from its dark Euro One colors to the lighter Ghost scheme now used. So I got to thinking how that line of thinking might have been applied to the A-7D Corsair II starting with this one:



The 140th Fighter Wing of the Colorado ANG did operate the A-7D from the mid-1970s right up to when the A-7D was finally retired from USAF service in the early 1990s (around 1991 or 92, I think). Now they fly the F-16, but suppose they kept the SLUF around? This one wears the two tone Hill II scheme that was used on the F-4 Phantom in its twilight years with the Air Force. I was a bit skeptical on how the Hill II scheme might look on the SLUF, but I gotta say it's come out better than I thought it would.

Sentinel Chicken

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #14 on: December 24, 2011, 01:55:28 PM »


This A-7D wears the same scheme that the A-10s were repainted in from Euro One to the two tone Ghost scheme (using Light Ghost Gray and Dark Ghost Gray). This bird wears the markings of the 23d Fighter Group based an England AFB (in Alexandria, Louisiana)- in real world history the 23d is the successor group to the Flying Tigers and in 1972 as the 23d TFW moved from McConnell AFB (where they flew the F-105) to England AFB to start operations with the A-7D Corsair. In 1980 the 23d began the transition to the A-10. In 1997 (and now based at Pope AFB) the 23d was redesignated as a Fighter Group and since then has more recently taken up residence at Moody AFB in Georgia, still flying the A-10.

But suppose the 23d staying with the A-7 and in 1992 the A-7s got the two tone Ghost scheme as used on the A-10? This illustration basically has the markings and colors of what such an A-10 wore, only this time it's on the A-7. Note the two tone grays on the vertical fin and on the wings as well, consistent with what was done in real life on the Warthog. Note also the false canopy painted under the nose section.

This one bears a resemblance due to its colors to a Navy TPS schemed Corsair, but it wears USAF markings. An interesting look indeed!

Sentinel Chicken

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #15 on: December 24, 2011, 02:00:55 PM »


Here's something a bit different, but still USAF low-viz. This A-7D is in the same camo as is worn by most USAF F-16s now with two tone gray on the top surfaces (FS36270 and FS36118) and FS36320 undersides.

In the real world, from 1978 to 1993 the 138th operated the A-7D Corsair II. Initially designated the 138th TFW, for a while the 138th was a Fighter Group in the mid 1990s before becoming just the 138th FW as they are today as an F-16 operator based at Tulsa International Airport in Oklahoma (and with more flamboyant tail markings with an Indian Chief head on the tail).

Compare this F-16 Hill scheme as applied to the SLUF with the Hill II scheme I used on the Colorado ANG bird earlier in this thread.

Sentinel Chicken

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #16 on: December 24, 2011, 02:01:24 PM »


Here's a variation of the Ghost scheme used on the previous A-7D I posted. This time I took a general pattern and markings that would be more appropriate to the Compass Ghost scheme used on the F-15 Eagle. Compare this with the 23d FG bird I posted earlier and you'll notice the differences despite the same colors being used.

In the real world, the 111th Fighter Wing has long been based at Willow Grove in Pennsylvania since 1963. Never an A-7D operator, the 111th FW currently is an A-10 operator having previously flown the OA-37 Dragonfly and O-2 Skymaster among many varied types in its history.

Sentinel Chicken

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #17 on: December 24, 2011, 02:01:47 PM »


This one so far is my favorite of the USAF low-viz Corsairs I've done so far. This is a SC ANG bird in the Mod Eagle colors- it's dark enough to suggest the mud-mover role, but gray enough/light enough to go with the spirit of reducing the visual signature of the aircraft when seen from the ground.

In the real world, the 169th FW is the primary flying unit of the South Carolina ANG and since 1983 has flown the F-16. But in their history, the Swamp Foxes did fly the A-7D Corsair II.

Offline Bladerunner

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #18 on: December 24, 2011, 02:14:16 PM »
Very nice!  :)
Now that is so subtle, yet brilliant. Think you'll fool many if you had to build it.  :in-love:

Sentinel Chicken

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #19 on: December 24, 2011, 10:47:13 PM »
After I had posted the A-7 in Mod Eagle with the South Carolina ANG, a friend asked about a print of it and I came up with this showing a boss bird and line bird with the Swamp Foxes:



It came out to 11x14 inches in size and surprisingly he wasn't the only one who bought one. I guess the world is full of secret whiffers who just don't know they're whiffers yet. Too bad the modern precision guided munitions never made it on the SLUF.

Offline Jeffry Fontaine

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #20 on: December 25, 2011, 01:16:25 AM »
JP,

Love your SLUF's, especially the Hill scheme on the A-7D, 140th FW, CO ANG, and the A-7D, 138th FG, OK ANG.  Both schemes look excellent
« Last Edit: December 25, 2011, 01:21:43 AM by jeffryfontaine »
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Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #21 on: December 25, 2011, 08:04:41 AM »
Your profiles are always so clean and plausible.  I love the modern weapons on old birds.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline lauhof52

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #22 on: December 26, 2011, 10:46:21 PM »
Magnificent stuff!! :)

regards
Lauhof

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #23 on: December 27, 2011, 01:49:19 AM »
As always, top notch work, I've always loved the A-7 and you sure do them proud.
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Jeff G.

Sentinel Chicken

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Re: The Utter Aviation Randomness of Sentinel Chicken
« Reply #24 on: December 27, 2011, 05:47:06 AM »

This particular print depicts two Tigersharks in the colors of the Arkansas ANG's 188th Fighter Wing "Flying Razorbacks" based at Fort Smith Municipal Airport. In the real world, the 188th FW has recently transitioned from the F-16 to the A-10. Markings on both are based on tail markings used on the 188th's own F-16s before the transition to the Warthog.

Funny story on this one. At Scalefest, there was an ex-TWA pilot who had come by my tables several times to look at this print. Turns out he drove in from Little Rock and was attending an auction in the exhibition hall next door for vintage video games. He saw the crowds going into Scalefest and decided to check it out. After his third or fourth trip to the table, Scooterman (Brad) decides this guy is going to buy my prints if it's the last thing he does (I like to be next to the Whiff SIG tables, the shows are way more fun that way). Brad comes out from around the table and asks the guy his name which it turns out is also Brad. So Scoot tells him something to the effect "Look. From one Brad to another. Buy this print. You won't regret it."

Sale made, thanks to Scoot. ;-)