Author Topic: Logan's Profiles - SdKfz 231 Halbkettenfahrzeug  (Read 175277 times)

Offline Logan Hartke

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #15 on: December 26, 2011, 11:48:12 AM »
I was finally able to finish the one I've been working on for a while.



Quote
The French use of the Vought Viking did not end in 1940.  A number of French pilots escaped to Britain after France's surrender, soon forming the core of the Free French Air Force.  The RAF equipped one squadron with the Vikings that were excess to its needs.  Having been operated by the French before the Armistice, the Viking was quite popular with the French pilots.  It wasn't long before they were assigned missions supporting Allied forces in North Africa.  The Free French Vikings gave accurate and effective close support throughout their time in the Middle East.  After suffering significant losses throughout 1941-42, GB Lorraine embarked for Britain to be re-equipped.

The main thing about this one was that I had to create the British 500 lb GP bomb for this profile, something that I intend to get more use out of later.  I also had to do most of the Lorraine Cross roundel myself to match the pictures I used as reference.  Finally, the research for the FAFL wasn't easy and I ended up not using a lot of what I intended because I found contradictory sources and there's not much else that bothers me more when doing research for these profiles.

Merry Christmas!

Logan

Offline Doom!

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #16 on: December 27, 2011, 01:38:21 AM »
Logan, these are great! Glad to see you back in action.  :)
Doom!
Jeff G.

Offline lauhof52

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #17 on: December 27, 2011, 03:55:52 PM »
Just TOP! Logan. :-*  Lauhof

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #18 on: December 28, 2011, 03:52:06 PM »


Quote
After the 1940 Armistice, most of the surviving French aircraft were incorporated into the Vichy French Air Force.  The Vikings of GB I/19 and GB II/19 were transferred to Algeria, where--due to attrition and a lack of spares--GB I/19 was disbanded.  Its remaining equipment and personnel were incorporated into GB II/19 which was then renamed...GB I/19 the next year, maintaining its original traditions.  It would remain in Algeria throughout 1941 and 1942, finally standing down on 10 November when Admiral Darlan signed a ceasefire with the Allies following Operation Torch.  This would not be the end of GB I/19 or its Vikings, both continuing to serve in the training role as the French prepared to liberate their homeland from Nazi occupation.

The profile depicts one of GB I/19's aircraft in mid-1942 in Algeria, before the Allied invasion of North Africa.  It shows an aircraft with the full extent of Vichy markings and before the French roundel was deleted from aircraft sides later in 1942.

Things to note about this profile:

This is the first profile I've had to do that is essentially 2 different aircraft.  The first was mostly done already, having been the 1940 French Viking I did two years ago.  It would just be a more heavily worn version of that same aircraft, being 2 years later.  The other aircraft was that Vichy one, covered in red and yellow stripes just a few weeks earlier.  Unfortunately...that concept does play well with paint chipping, wear, etc.  In short, it made my life pretty difficult and put layers way out of order.  I don't know if I'll ever use this Viking as a template for any others my layers are so out of whack.

The other things that sucked were the stripes on curved surfaces.  Those on the wing and ESPECIALLY those on the engine cowling.  I like the way they turned out, but those were a big pain.  They took forever and were the hardest thing about the whole profile.  Anyway, I do love how this one turned out and I hope all of you do, too!

Cheers,

Logan

Offline lauhof52

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #19 on: December 28, 2011, 05:13:50 PM »
Excelent work! Logan.  :want:  Lauhof

Offline Doom!

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #20 on: December 28, 2011, 11:57:11 PM »
Logan, I know how you feel about layers getting out of whack...can get pretty confusing to get the look your after.  :dizzy:  On the other hand it appears to have been worth it!  :)
Doom!
Jeff G.

Offline BadersBusCompany

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #21 on: December 29, 2011, 01:13:44 AM »
Hi Logan, excellent profiles as ever and its great to see you on here  :D

regards

Mark
Driving trains when I'd rather be drawing planes!!

Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #22 on: December 29, 2011, 03:17:51 AM »
Colourful!
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #23 on: December 29, 2011, 05:49:22 AM »
Thanks, guys!  I'm glad you all liked it.  I'm really happy about how the Vichy Viking turned out.

I got a question on the What-If forum and I thought some of you might be interested in my response to it, so I'll repost it below:

Each of my profiles probably takes an average of about 6+ hours, with about half of that time being research.  I'll check serial numbers, unit movement dates, unit strengths, construction numbers, etc.  It's not just important for me to get the markings right, but to know WHY the markings are a certain way, then try to verify them with actual photos.  That's why my somewhat mocking title on the forum is "rivet-counting whiffer".  I'm the closest thing the Whiffing world has to a JMN.  I'm not that critical of other people's work, but I want mine to be right.

In fact, I think that making a historically accurate Whif profile is actually HARDER than making a 100% historically accurate profile.  Given good enough photographs of the subject, all you have to do is copy what you see in the picture.  You don't have to know what any of the markings mean, heck, you don't need to even know what kind of plane it is!

When you're Whifing a profile, you have to know WHY every marking existed on the plane.  You need to put the red prop stripe in the right place.  You need to know that the white line on the tail is an LSO stripe and you need to change the angle for your plane compared to the real-world example you got it from.  You need to make up an aircraft type code if it's Finnish, make up a manufacturer code if it's Dutch, find an unused serial number series if it's British, etc.  These are all things that people figured out and did for you 70+ years ago if you're doing a REAL profile.  If you're doing a Whif, you need to step into the shoes of some underpaid clerk in a cold Finnish Ministry of Defence basement office and figure out what unused two-letter code is most logical for the aircraft in question.  This is both the fun and frustrating part of these profiles.  It takes sometimes hours of research.  For example, I bought about 2 books and joined a Yahoo group on NEI Aviation just so I could make an educated guess as to what codes the ML-KNIL and MLD would use on Vikings.  This isn't a problem for real-world profilers!



From a technical standpoint, I use Adobe Photoshop, currently CS5.  Most of my profiles are hundreds of layers (553 with the Vichy Viking), but only about a third of them (190 on the Vichy Viking) are actually visible in the profile, many of them being unused "options" (different kinds of bombs/spinners/etc) or merely stepping stones to get to the final result.

Another thing that's different about the way I do profiles is that almost nothing has multiple colors on the same layer.  With the exception of unit markings, I basically make every layer a single color.  Also, almost every layer is straight up ff0000 RED.  What I then do is apply a color overlay layer to change the color of that layer to what I want.  In my experience, it's a bit more seamless to quickly change colors that way.  Also, if I want to see the exact boundaries of any particular layer, all I have to do is take off the overlay and it pops right out.  The other thing that I like about this method is that it allows me to quickly add things like patterns, strokes, gradients, etc. with very little trouble.  If you really want to make it its own layer with the right color (sometime very helpful), just throw in another blank layer and merge them.

Cheers,

Logan

Sentinel Chicken

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #24 on: December 29, 2011, 09:49:45 AM »
I'm impressed with how you've used Photoshop for these profiles, Logan. I had started out that way but very early on vector-based software was more suited to how I work (currently using Illustrator CS2). One of the things that a lot of folks don't realize is that there are a lot of similarities to kit building in "assembling" these profiles as I have my layers based upon sections and sub-assemblies not unlike a model kit. We also have to take into consideration weathering and paint schemes and even the scale effect at times.

Thanks for the detailed explanation of your approach!

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #25 on: December 29, 2011, 02:13:59 PM »
I'm impressed with how you've used Photoshop for these profiles, Logan. I had started out that way but very early on vector-based software was more suited to how I work (currently using Illustrator CS2). One of the things that a lot of folks don't realize is that there are a lot of similarities to kit building in "assembling" these profiles as I have my layers based upon sections and sub-assemblies not unlike a model kit. We also have to take into consideration weathering and paint schemes and even the scale effect at times.

Thanks for the detailed explanation of your approach!

Thanks, Sentinel Chicken!  Your profiles always have great lines, colors, and details.  They always look so crisp and clean.

One of the advantages to me doing the profiles in Photoshop, however, is that there is a finite limit to what you can do.  This is only an advantage because of the human element making the profile.  If I used vector art, I'd be tempted to include way more detail in the profile than could ever be made out by anyone.  I'm the sort of person that would only realize this after I'd finished typing up the ingredients on the pack of Beemans gum in the pocket of the leather jacket on the pilot.  Fortunately, once I hit pixels, I can call it well and truly done in Photoshop.  That can be a real advantage when you get to the obsession stage of a profile.

Even with the limitations of Photoshop vs Illustrator, I still have a 3 foot wide giant graphic of the XB-51 profile that a professional printer friend of mine was kind enough to do for me with no loss in quality at all.  You can read the small print on the side of the plane.  Not bad for non-vector art!  I've always hated the monkeys that designed Illustrator, too.  In my use of the Adobe Creative Suite at work, Illustrator has always crashed on me far more often than Photoshop.  Illustrator's just less intuitive when I use it, too, even after about 5 years.  I've considered switching a few times, but I don't see it happening.  I'd rather just increase the resolution of the Photoshop images I do, something I've always done, anyway.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Jeremak

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #26 on: December 29, 2011, 07:02:12 PM »
I also use a non-vector software, but it's Gimp, not Photoshop. In my PZL P.11 I had layers for (from the top): wires, white background (on top to mask some things), shadow, glass, tires, 8 laiers of lighting effect on different parts of plane, weathering layer (made of about 3-4 merged), 2 layers for rivetes, one for effect of corrugated sheet on tail, one for colour difference between fuselage panels, machine guns, leather in cockpit, two for texture, unseen lines, which on profile was based, and 11 layers for three different colour schemes. It's good that I keep all that files on my computer. Also: I know what you mean Logan, when you sey, that "layers goes wrong": I've had one that incicdent, with one of my WW1 profiles.

Offline RussC

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #27 on: January 01, 2012, 05:15:11 AM »
Hello, Logan. Just met you over on WI and now over here as well.

 :D

Russ

Offline Logan Hartke

  • High priest in the black arts of profiling...
  • Rivet-counting whiffer
Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #28 on: January 01, 2012, 07:27:20 AM »
Thanks everyone!  Anyone want another profile?



Quote
In 1941, Germany turned its ire towards the Balkans, quickly rolling through Yugoslavia and Greece.  With them the whole time were the Stukas, hitting enemy bridges, tanks, strongpoints, and ships.  Nowhere would the Stuka become more feared than in the skies over the island of Crete.  The Royal Navy operated unchallenged in the Mediterranean at that time, establishing a protective steel ring around the island, thwarting Axis plans to control the Aegean Sea...or so they thought.  Junkers Ju 52s appeared in large numbers overhead on the 20th of May, dropping thousands of paratroopers on the Greek island.

While also supporting the Fallschirmjäger on the ground, the Stukas also sought out targets at sea, striking at the Royal Navy with near impunity, the Royal Air Force unable to contest the skies over Crete.  As the hard-fought battle for Crete shifted in favor of the Germans, the Royal Navy soon began a desperate rescue mission, evacuating the surviving Allied troops from the island.  The Stukas would once again make themselves known, striking at the British cruisers and destroyers fleeing the island.  Some ships were heavily damaged, limping into Alexandria many hours after the ordeal, but others were not so lucky taking their crews and soldiers to the bottom of the Mediterranean.

The profile above depicts a Ju 187 Wiking (former French V-187-F2 Viking) of Sturzkampfgeschwader 3 as it appeared during the devastating attacks on HMS Dido and HMS Orion on May 29th, 1941.

Things to note about this profile:

Nothing technically too hard about this one.  I used my previous German profile but gave it a good deal of weathering and a lot more detail.  Overall, I think it's a lot more polished than the previous German profile I did some time ago.

Cheers,

Logan

Offline Maverick

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Re: Logan's Profiles - Japanese A9He1-N "Wade" Floatplane
« Reply #29 on: January 01, 2012, 07:40:30 AM »
Nice ships Logan.  My favourite has to be the Vichy one.

Regards,

John
Regards,

John