Author Topic: Litvyak's profiles  (Read 165134 times)

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #425 on: December 24, 2021, 01:20:57 AM »
You really need a floatplane version in this mix... ;)

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Offline Jeffry Fontaine

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #426 on: December 24, 2021, 01:23:08 AM »
From that angle in flight you can really see the familiar lines of the DHC Otter and Twin Otter. 
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Offline apophenia

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #427 on: December 25, 2021, 06:14:17 AM »
You really need a floatplane version in this mix... ;)

For sure! Hmmm ... One of the Alberni Airways pair on floats for the Port Alberni Harbour Quay to Ucluelet run? Maybe in an August 1975 centennial livery?

I got pulled down the https://dominionofbc.miraheze.org rabbit-hole yet again!

Browsing BE English, I was intrigued to see that "Yod-dropping is present in all BC dialects". Does that suggest more immigration from East Anglia and environs than in OTL? Or is it just a rationalization? (There is certainly lots of yod/yod-dropping inconsistency in OTL BC usage.)

For those curious (see what I did there?), yod-dropping refers to losing the small 'y' sound inserted between consonents and vowels.

BTW: Yod-dropping is distinct from YOD-dropping which means never having to go back to CFB Cold Lake ever again  ;)
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Offline raafif

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #428 on: January 01, 2022, 02:02:51 PM »
hey Litvyak,
The Doves are nice, can you include the D.H. 114 Heron in this set of profiles ?

I may get my hands on one in the next 12 months ....
« Last Edit: January 02, 2022, 07:05:19 AM by raafif »

Offline Litvyak

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #429 on: February 12, 2022, 02:17:59 PM »
hey Litvyak,
The Doves are nice, can you include the D.H. 114 Heron in this set of profiles ?

I may get my hands on one in the next 12 months ....

A BC-ified version of the Heron (as the DHBC-2 Heron) will be forthcoming...
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Offline Litvyak

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #430 on: February 12, 2022, 02:24:02 PM »
Browsing BE English, I was intrigued to see that "Yod-dropping is present in all BC dialects". Does that suggest more immigration from East Anglia and environs than in OTL? Or is it just a rationalization? (There is certainly lots of yod/yod-dropping inconsistency in OTL BC usage.)

That's a possibility, though mostly it's part of a generalised North American English pattern which for one reason or other took hold more than other features. I haven't really given much deep thought to immigration patterns from England in specific, but there was very significant Welsh immigration in the area around RW Revelstoke - called Blaenau *there* (which is among the top 5 in population).

Quote
BTW: Yod-dropping is distinct from YOD-dropping which means never having to go back to CFB Cold Lake ever again  ;)

Hahahaha
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Offline apophenia

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #431 on: February 16, 2022, 09:33:37 AM »
That's a possibility, though mostly it's part of a generalised North American English pattern which for one reason or other took hold more than other features. I haven't really given much deep thought to immigration patterns from England in specific, but there was very significant Welsh immigration in the area around RW Revelstoke - called Blaenau *there* (which is among the top 5 in population).


According to the University of Nottingham's Key to English Place-Names, 'stoke' comes from OE stoc (a secondary settlement) implying an "outlying farm/settlement". With early efforts to farm along the Columbia River valley, that makes perfect sense.
-- http://kepn.nottingham.ac.uk/map/place/Devon/Revelstoke

Blaenau translates as 'highlands', which makes even more sense. (Cymraeg sydd orau!)

Mind you, the root blaen apparently means stream/river source ... which doesn't fit quite so well for Revelstoke  :P
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Offline Ifor

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #432 on: February 16, 2022, 05:29:32 PM »
Is there a reason why the Welsh moved to this area?

Offline perttime

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #433 on: February 16, 2022, 06:05:43 PM »
According to Wikipedia, Revelstoke, British Columbia, was named after Edward Baring, 1st Baron Revelstoke. The town was renamed in his honour, commemorating his role in securing the financing necessary for completion of the Canadian Pacific Railway

In general, I can see people moving to America picking areas that are not too different from the original home, in terms of climate or what you can do for a living.

Offline apophenia

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #434 on: February 17, 2022, 09:05:49 AM »
Thanks perttime, that fits. When Canadians aren't complaining about bankers, they voting for them or naming stuff after them  :P

More trivia: The original town was called Farwell - there is still a Farwell Park - but was renamed Revelstoke after the CPR came through, as you said.

Is there a reason why the Welsh moved to this area?

Mining opportunities would be my guess.
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Offline Litvyak

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #435 on: March 05, 2022, 06:04:33 AM »
Is there a reason why the Welsh moved to this area?

I haven't really dug into the history of that, yet...
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Offline Litvyak

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #436 on: July 16, 2022, 05:45:51 AM »
And finally something new - another 'big story'

DHBC Breaks (Almost) Big - the Trident



Airlines in British Columbia, particularly Air BC and Inter-Dominion, closely followed the developments in the United Kingdom surrounding the British European Airways requirement for a new jet airliner. Shortly after De Havilland UK proposed the DH.121 in 1957, it was proposed that DHBC might produce the type for the North American market. Letters of intent were signed by BEA for 24 Tridents and by Inter-Dominion for 25 in 1958, which got the project underway. However, when BEA modified its requirements and persuaded DH to make a smaller aircraft, IDAL withdrew its interest.

After some negotiation, however, it was agreed that DHBC would take over development of the larger design; since the smaller DH.121 Trident - this name was announced at the Farnborough Airshow of 1960 - was to use the smaller Spey engine, Hoffar Aero Engines acquired a licence to build the Rolls-Royce RB.141 Medway engine that had been intended for the larger design. Restructuring of the British aviation industry - which led to the complete independence of De Havilland BC in 1961 - caused some delays, but in the same year the DHBC project was formally designated DHBC-7 Trident. Despite the division of effort, however, much work was undertaken jointly by DHUK and DHBC, with the result that the British Trident 1 and the British Columbian Trident 7 shared a great deal in common, to the extent that there was a high degree of parts commonality between the two types.

Although the Trident 1 undertook its first flight in January 1962, it was another four years until the Trident 7A first took to the sky.

DHBC-7 Trident 7A

The Trident was groundbreaking in many ways, being the first aircraft in the world capable of landing in below-minimum (Category II) conditions. This autoland system was operated by three independent autopiilots capable of guiding the aircraft automatically during airfield approach, flare, touchdown and even roll-out from the landing runway, which made it possible to operate the Trident when other aircraft were forced to divert. The three-person cockpit crew was also assisted by an innovative moving-map system displaying the aircraft's momentary position, and was the first aircraft to be fitted with a quick-access flight data recorder. The standard equipment fit included two VOR-ILS systems, dual ADF, HF and VHF radios (the HF radio equipped with SELCAL), three radio altimeters, a transponder, and weather radar.

The three engines were located in the aft section of the fuselage, two in nacelles mounted on either side, with the third in the centre on the same plane as the outboard engines; air was supplied to the centre engine via an intake mounted atop the fuselage at the base of the vertical stabiliser via an S-duct. Only the nacelle-mounted engines were fitted with thrust reversers. Each Rolls-Royce/Hoffar RB.141 Medway engines of the Trident 7A operated an independent hydraulic system via an engine-driven pump powering nose wheel steering, brakes, undercarriage, and all flight surfaces; two electrically driven pumps were supplied as a backup for the hydraulic system.

A Garrett AiResearch GTCP-85 APU was fitted in a fairing at the base of the vertical stabiliser above the centre engine to run the air conditioning system, start the engines, and drive generators to supply electric power on the ground; the APU could be operated in flight to drive the hydraulic backup pumps. Initially a distinctive feature of the BC Trident, the fairing-mounted APU was later added to the British Trident 2E.

Aside from the latter being ten feet longer, the greatest difference between the Trident 1 and the 7A was in the wings. Whilst the 1 had a span of 89' 10", the wing of the 7A was based on that of the Trident 1E of 1965, which had a 95 foot wingspan and surface area of 1,446 square feet; the DHBC designers took this a step further, increasing the span to 98 feet and an area of 1,462 square feet by adding Küchemann wingtips to the 1E design - this design was used by Hawker Siddeley on the Trident 2E and 3B. They were made of aluminium alloy stringers and skins of continuous wingtip-to-wingtip construction with a six-cell centre section box across the fuselage, a two-cell box from the wing root to a point at 40% of the span, and a single-cell box from there to the wingtip. The wings featured full-length leading edge slats and three-section double-slotted trailing edge flaps and ailerons of metal construction; the forward outboard flap acted as an airbrake, whilst the forward inner flap served as a spoiler or lift dumper. The leading and trailing edge devices were operated by off three independent hydraulic systems, of which only one was needed for full activation; there was no provision for manual reversion. Fuel was stored in five wing-internal tanks - two in each wing and one in the wing centre section; pressure fuelling was completed via a single point on each wing.

The tailplane of the Trident 7A was fifteen inches taller than that of the Trident 1; this was another DHBC feature adopted by Hawker Siddeley, in this case on the Trident 3B. It had an all-metal vertical surface with a rudder and an all-moving horizontal stabiliser with geared and slotted trailing edge flaps without trim tabs.

The undercarriage was arranged in a tricycle configuration. The twin-wheel nose gear, fitted with a Lockheed oleo-pneumatic shock absorber, was offset two feet from the centreline to retract sideways into its well; this arrangement freed up the extra space needed by the bulky autoland equipment positioned beneath the cockpit. The main gear had quad-wheel bogies with wheels arranged side-by-side and were fitted with Hawker Siddeley shock absorbers. They rotated 90 degrees and increased six inches in length during retraction into the under-fuselage centre section wells. Wheels were supplied by Hoffar's Automobile Division built to a Dunlop design with tyres from Dunlop, fitted with multiple disc brakes with the Dunlop Maxaret anti-skid system. An optional gravel kit was available to allow the Trident 7A to land on unprepared strips; this was made available for all subsequent DHBC Tridents.

Cabin pressurisation and air conditioning was achieved by means of two Hawker Siddeley Dynamics aircon systems, of which only one was needed for complete cabin pressurisation. The aft section, the undercarriage wells, and the wing centre section were unpressurised. A pneumatic system was installed for lavatory water and toilet flushing.

Baggage, cargo, and mail were carried in two below-decks holds fore and aft of the wing, accessed via a single hatch for each located starboard; like the main doors, they were of plug type. An optional aircon system was available to allow for the transport of live animals in the forward hold.

The first prototype Trident 7A (c/n C826/1966), registered VB-TRI, was completed in March 1966 and made its maiden flight on 11 April; two more were completed in May (VB-TRJ, c/n C835/1966) and June (VB-TRK, c/n C843/1966). TRK was written off after a landing accident following a test flight, but the other two prototypes were converted to a Combi configuration and transferred to the Royal BC Air Force in 1970, which operated them until 1992; the first prototype is preserved at RBCAF Kelowna.

Production of the Trident 7A had begun on the basis of a firm order for 25 from Inter-Dominion placed in 1965, followed a month later by an order for nine from Air BC; but a major coup came shortly afterwards, when Southern Airways of the US placed an order for fourteen. Two other American airlines placed orders for the Trident 7A, Pacific Southwest Airlines for five and Panagra Airways for eight, a total of twelve were sold to Brazil - six each to VARIG and Cruzeiro do Sul, and five went to Air Jamaica of the West Indies, but only eight were sold outside of the Americas, to All Nippon Airways of Japan. Pacific Western Airlines (twelve), Awyr Cymru Newydd (two), and the Royal BC Air Force (three) were the other three customers. Including the prototypes a total of 105 Trident 7A were built between 1966 and 1973; the last one (c/n C1322/1973) was delivered to Panagra Airways.

Five remain in service as of 2022, of which three are with Aerosucre Colombia; these had been converted to freighters in 2000. The other two - both having been converted to Combi configuration, are in Angola, one with Air Gemini and the other owned by Transafrik International and operated on behalf of TAAG Angola Airlines.

(to be continued...)
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Offline apophenia

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #437 on: July 18, 2022, 05:14:55 AM »
Very nice  :smiley:  (And good to see that Hoffar Brothers are still in the game  :D )

I'm guessing that there are Trident 7A profiles to follow?
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Offline Litvyak

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #438 on: July 18, 2022, 05:57:46 AM »
Very nice  :smiley:  (And good to see that Hoffar Brothers are still in the game  :D )

Well it's a complicated story, but yeah, Hoffar are still around. Armstrong Siddeley bought HAE in 1948, building complete engines until 1950; they planned to produce the AS Sapphire but that fell through, so AS created Hoffar Auto to make use of the huge plant at Lumby... that was eventually spun off and today is owned by BC Rover-Leyland, still building cars. Aero moved back to Dollarton to build components for DHBC and Supermarine BC and Armstrong Siddeley as well... from 1961 Bristol Siddeley, from 1966 for Rolls Royce, from 1971 for BAC, from 1977 for British Aerospace... since 1999 it's the Hoffar Division of BAE Systems... so it hasn't been an independent company in half a century but the brothers' name still lives on.

Quote
I'm guessing that there are Trident 7A profiles to follow?

Yup, here's the first batch!



The launch customer of the Trident 7A was BOAC subsidiary Inter-Dominion Air Lines, who took delivery of twenty-five between 1967 and 1973. Five were sold in 1978 - four to Libyan Arab Airlines and one to Kenya Airways, but the rest served IDAL reliably and accident-free over the next two decades. 1995 saw the sale of three to Canadian Airlines International and the retirement of a fourth, followed by one retirement in 1996. Two were retired each year over the next three years; of the remaining eight, four were retired in 2000 and four in 2001. The last flight of a Trident 7A was flown by VB-IDT (c/n C1259/1972) from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada to Kelowna on 28 August 2001. Shown here is the first production 7A (c/n C858/1967). Delivered to Inter-Dominion as VB-IDA, it was retired in 1998.



The second batch of three Trident 7As off the production line were delivered to Air BC, who received nine between 1967 and 1971. The first off the roster was VB-ABE (c/n C985/1968) sold to Air Mauritius in 1981, followed by VB-ABB (c/n C873/1967) to Air Burundi in 1991. The remaining seven were retired between 1997 and 2000; the last flight of an Air BC Trident 7A was from Meziadin to Prince George on 19 July 2000, flown by VB-ABH (C1119/1970). Shown here is VB-ABC (c/n C874/1967), the third to be delivered to Air BC; it was retired in 1998.



Southern Airways of the United States were the first foreign airline to order the DHBC Trident, receiving a total of fourteen between 1967 and 1973; the third batch of three rolled out of the factory were delivered to Southern. On 14 November 1970 N116S (c/n C1018/1969), operating as charter Flight SO932 from Kinston, North Carolina, to Huntington, West Virginia, crashed into a hill just short of the Tri-State Airport, killing all 75 passengers and crew; pilot error was determined to be the cause of the crash, with the plane descending "below Minimum Descent Altitude during a non-precision approach under adverse operating conditions, without visual contact with the runway environment". Almost exactly two years later, on 10 November 1972 N115S (C932/1968) was operating Flight SO49, a scheduled route service from Memphis, Tennessee to Miami, Florida via three stops in Alabama and Florida, when it was hijacked by three men demanding a ransom of $10 million. After flying around eastern part of North America making stops at various airports in the US and Canada, it ultimately landed in Havana, Cuba, where the three hijackers were arrested at gunpoint and the plane was released to return to the US. Aside from these incidents, Southern had an excellent safety record with the Trident 7A, and the remaining thirteen were all passed on to Republic Airlines when Southern merged with North Central Airlines. All thirteen were still in service when Republic was absorbed by Northwest Airlines, who continued to operate them into the late 1990s; the last one - N115S - lasted until 2002.


More to come later!
« Last Edit: July 20, 2022, 11:57:19 AM by Litvyak »
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Offline GTX_Admin

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #439 on: July 19, 2022, 01:10:19 AM »
 :smiley:
All hail the God of Frustration!!!

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Offline Litvyak

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #440 on: July 19, 2022, 01:59:39 PM »


In order to supplement the Canadair Calgary (CL-44) transports operated by 103 (Transport) Squadron, in 1970 the Royal BC Air Force acquired the first two prototypes of the Trident 7A (c/n C826/1966 and C835/1966). Registered BC2601 and BC2602, these were immediately converted to Combi configuration through the addition of a 10' by 6' cargo door on the port side between the two passenger entry doors. Three more were delivered new from De Havilland, one each in 1971 (BC2603, c/n C1129/1971), 1972 (BC2604, c/n C1222/1972) and 1973 (BC2605, c/n C1320/1973), each built to Combi specification by the factory; although a number were converted to Combi configuration in subsequent years, these were the only Tridents built new as such. BC2603 was retired in 1991, and the remaining four in the following year, replaced by the McDonnell Douglas Detroit VC.2 (MD-11). BC2601, as the first Trident built, was transferred to the Air Force Association's Historical Flight, which operated it as a support aircraft until 2009. Since then it has been stored at RBCAF Kelowna; there are plans for it to be eventually transferred to the BC Aviation Museum.




Panagra Airways began its long association with the Trident in 1969, when it took delivery of the first of eight Trident 7A, eventually going on to operate a total of 79 Tridents of various types - despite having inherited 41 Boeing 727s when it absorbed Braniff International in 1970 and a further 59 when National Airlines was merged into Panagra in 1980. The 727-000 and -100 models were all retired by 1986, but Panagra's original trijet, the Trident 7A, soldiered on until 1997, when the last of the eight, N504PG (c/n C1121/1971), was retired. Shown here is N907PG (c/n C1322/1973), the last Trident 7A built; it was delivered to Panagra in 1973 and sold to Shabair of Zaire in 1995.




The oldest Trident still in regular service is Trident 7A(C) S9-PST (c/n C955/1968), owned by Transafrik International of Angola, bought from First Air of Canada in 2006. First Air had converted it to Combi configuration in 2004 after purchasing it from Royal Aviation; it was originally delivered to Pacific Western. It is the third Trident 7A owned by Transafrik and, as can be seen from the TAAG herald to the left of the forward passenger door, it is operated under contract to TAAG Angola Airlines to serve a diamond mine.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2022, 06:36:42 AM by Litvyak »
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Offline apophenia

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #441 on: July 20, 2022, 04:51:36 AM »
Very nice! That down-swooping cheat line on the RBCAF and Air BC examples suggests a smiley face (current Group Build opportunity?).

You mentioned a "twin-engine Kehloke" in your Inspiration/Engineering Dept. post. Would that be a 'Bident' derivative? If so, would this twin also be RB.141-powered?
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Offline Litvyak

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #442 on: July 20, 2022, 06:32:11 AM »
Very nice! That down-swooping cheat line on the RBCAF and Air BC examples suggests a smiley face (current Group Build opportunity?).

I do have a Trident 7A in the pipeline for the GB!

Quote
You mentioned a "twin-engine Kehloke" in your Inspiration/Engineering Dept. post. Would that be a 'Bident' derivative? If so, would this twin also be RB.141-powered?

I see what you did there! The Kehloke is indeed a derivative of the Trident, but I'm not sure about the powerplant yet - all Trident 7 variants are powered by the Medway, but the Trident 8/Skookum Trident uses the JT8D-209; whether this is because further development of the Medway was unsatisfactory/abandoned or simply not yet available in time for the, I don't know for certain, but I was leaning towards the former.


Meanwhile, I did another Air BC Trident:


Trident 7A VB-ABH (c/n C1119/1970) in the livery introduced in 1984, as it appeared when it made the last flight of an Air BC Trident 7A on 19 July 2000, from Meziadin to Prince George. The Trident 7A left Air BC service before introduction of the current livery in 2010.

(you might have noticed that the previous livery was based on the RW BC Air Lines scheme; this one is based on the one Air BC used when I was a kid).
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Offline apophenia

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #443 on: July 20, 2022, 08:08:35 AM »
Lovely! I remember those schemes. Back in the early '70s, Air BC Mallards had a simple cheatline in blue with the wordmark in the same colour on the rear fuselage. (At the time, I worked across the tarmac at Pacific Avionics.)

I had a memory of their Goose being in the same scheme. But an online search shows a Goose with red cheatline, 'B.C. Air Lines' titles and a red-circled 'Thunderbird' logo on the tailfin. (Maybe they were all red and my memory here is just faulty?)
-- https://1000aircraftphotos.com/Contributions/FordCharles/6797.htm

I have a soft-spot for that 'Thunderbird' logo (which made a bit of a comeback years later on some of the 'Twotters').

Agreed on the Medway being tricky. I know it was phased out of production sometime in the early to mid '60s but have never been able to confirm a date.
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Offline Litvyak

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #444 on: July 25, 2022, 03:20:36 AM »
Awyr Cymru Newydd of BC entered the jet age with a pair of Trident 7As delivered new from DHBC in 1971 and 1972, and in 1980, the fleet was doubled through the purchase of two from All Nippon Airways. All four were passed on to Kootenay Airways when the two airlines merged in 1983.


The two Trident 7As delivered new to Awyr Cymru Newydd in 1971 and 1972 were painted in ACN's original livery dating back to the airline's establishment in 1950, based on the colours of the Welsh Cross of St David, and using the Golden Dragon (Y Ddraig Aur) of Owain Glyndŵr on the tail.


In 1979 ACN introduced a more vibrant new livery based on the colours of the Welsh flag of 1959; it was unveiled on Trident 7A VB-CYW.


The two Tridents bought from All Nippon Airways in 1980 were flown to Blaenau by ACN pilots from Tokyo to Blaenau via a stop at Unalaska (Dutch Harbor), Alaska. They entered service immediately in this hybrid ANA/ACN livery, given ACN titles and the red dragon upon arrival in BC; VB-CZA seen here was repainted into full ACN colours in April 1981; VB-CYZ didn't receive the green and red scheme until August 1982 - less than a year before ACN was merged into Kootenay Airways.
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Offline apophenia

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #445 on: July 25, 2022, 08:48:34 AM »
Very nice! I especially like the 1979 Awyr Cymru Newydd scheme  :smiley:
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Offline Litvyak

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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #446 on: July 25, 2022, 11:06:49 AM »
Thanks, I rather like it, too! I was actually pleasantly surprised by the hybrid livery, in my mind's eye I thought it would be much more unpleasant than it turned out. It's still not *nice*, though - good as ANA's Mohican scheme looks with ANA titles, the red dragon somehow clashes with the blue, but I thought it would be worse.

I'm thinking of making a minor tweak to the first one, and making the white be bare metal, too, when I get around to doing older ACN planes; I think that would fit better with the general trends in airline colour schemes of the late 40s and early 50s.

It just occurred to me that in the early 50s there would have been two airlines in BC with black and yellow, since those were QCA's colours too...
"God save our Queen and heaven bless the Maple Leaf forever!"

Dominion of BC - https://dominionofbc.miraheze.org/wiki/British_Columbia

"Bernard, this doesn't say anything!" "Why thank you, Prime Minister."

Offline Litvyak

  • Shifting between quantum realities...
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    • Dominion of British Columbia
Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #447 on: July 26, 2022, 12:47:54 AM »
Canadian Airlines International was established in 1986 through the merger of Nordair and Eastern Provincial Airlines. The aircraft are inscribed "Canadian" on the port side and "Canadien" on the starboard.


Canadian bought five Trident 7As, two from Pacific Western in 1994, and three from Inter-Dominion in 1995. They were painted in the original scheme dating back to 1986, featuring the logo on the tail that blended elements of the logos of both Nordair and EPA.



A new livery, known as "Proud Wings", was introduced in 1999; unfortunately, the striking scheme didn't cut as well on the three-engined Trident as it did on aircraft without a central engine. The 7As lasted nearly a decade with Canadian: C-GCIB was the first to be retired in 2002, C-GCID seen here was the last, in 2004.
"God save our Queen and heaven bless the Maple Leaf forever!"

Dominion of BC - https://dominionofbc.miraheze.org/wiki/British_Columbia

"Bernard, this doesn't say anything!" "Why thank you, Prime Minister."

Offline apophenia

  • Perversely enjoys removing backgrounds.
  • Patterns? What patterns?
Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #448 on: July 26, 2022, 05:34:30 AM »
Oooo, those are nice!

I especially like the 'Proud Wings' scheme with the more naturalistic goose  :smiley:
Cryin' won't help you, prayin' won't do you no good

Offline The Big Gimper

  • Any model will look better in RCAF, SEAC or FAA markings
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  • Cut. Cut. Cut. Measure. Cut. Cut. Crap. Toss.
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Re: Litvyak's profiles
« Reply #449 on: July 26, 2022, 07:06:17 AM »
I used to have this wonderful 3'x4' Proud Wings poster. I hope I still have it somewhere.

Work in progress ::

I am giving up listing them. They all end up on the shelf of procrastination anyways.

User and abuser of Bothans...